Clips & Pix: The Cranberries/Zombie

This is kind of crazy. Yesterday, I listened to Zombie by The Cranberries and thought I should take a closer look at this Irish alternative rock band for a post. Today, I’m finding myself writing this piece after the incredible news that lead vocalist Dolores O’Riordan suddenly passed away at age 46. I think her distinct way of singing and intense delivery make this song one of the most memorable tunes of the ’90s.

According to Rolling Stone, O’Riordan had been in London for a short recording session. The cause of her death hasn’t been revealed. Apparently, she struggled with some health issues that forced the band to cancel shows last year. The Rolling Stone story also noted a diagnosis with bipolar disease in 2014.

Zombie was the lead single to The Cranberries’ second studio album No Need To Argue, which appeared in October 1994. Written by O’Riordan in 1993 to commemorate two children who were killed during an IRA bombing in England earlier that year, Zombie was the band’s biggest hit. It reached no. 1 in Australia, France, Germany and various other countries. In their native Ireland, it peaked at no. 3, while in the UK, it climbed to no. 14. In the U.S., the tune didn’t make the Billboard Hot 100, though it entered various other Billboard charts, most notably Alternative Songs, which it topped.

Sources: Wikipedia, Rolling Stone, YouTube

“Steely Don” Turns 70 And Is Feeling Great

Donald Fagen has no intention to retire anytime soon

I’m a huge Steely Dan fan. If anything, last year brought them closer to me than ever before and not just because of the untimely death of Walter Becker. I also attended a couple of shows of an excellent Steely Dan tribute band called Royal Scam. On Wednesday, Donald Fagen turned 70, so doing a post on the man felt right. Since I previously covered Steely Dan including their history here, I’d like to primarily focus on Fagen’s solo music.

But first a bit of history. Donald Jay Fagen was born in Passaic, N.J. on January 10, 1948. He grew up in South Brunswick, N.J. According to Wikipedia, he didn’t like the suburban setting, feeling it was trapping him like a prison. These sentiments and Fagen’s love of late-night radio were inspirations for his first solo album The Nightfly.

It’s fair to say Fagen’s life changed forever when he met Becker in 1967 when they were both students at Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, N.Y. Fagen was impressed with Becker’s guitar skills. They soon discovered they liked similar music and decided to write songs together. They also started playing together in various local bands.

Donald Fagan & Walter Becker

The seeds for Steely Dan were sown in the summer of 1970, when Fagen and Becker responded to a Village Voice ad by guitarist Denny Dias, looking for a bassist and keyboard player with jazz chops. Becker was playing the bass at the time and would switch to the electric guitar later.

Steely Dan’s first lineup was assembled in December 1971, after Becker, Fagen and Dias had moved to Los Angeles. The additional members included Jeff “Skunk” Baxter (guitar), Jim Hodder (drums) and David Palmer (vocals). Earlier, Gary Katz, a staff producer at ABC Records, had hired Becker and Fagen as staff song writers. It was also Katz who signed the band to the label.

Between 1972 and 1980, Steely Dan released seven studio albums: Can’t Buy A Thrill (1972), Countdown To Ecstasy (1973), Pretzel Logic (1974), Katy Lied (1975), The Royal Scam (1976), Aja (1977) and Gaucho (1980). While I dig all of these records, to me the gem is Aja, which I previously covered here.

Following Steely Dan’s breakup in June 1981, Fagen started to work on his solo debut The Nightfly. Released in October 1982, this record remains the highlight of his solo catalog to date, in my opinion. It included various production staff and musicians who had been involved in Steely Dan records, for example producer Katz, bassist Anthony Jackson and lead guitarist Larry Carlton, something Fagen would continue on his future solo efforts. The opener I.G.Y., which according to Wikipedia stands for International Geophysical Year, “an international scientific project promoting collaboration among the world’s scientists.”

While it took Fagen 12 years to release his second solo album Kamakiriad in May 1993, he kept busy on other fronts, contributing to soundtracks and writing a column for Premiere magazine. He also worked together with Becker and Katz on Zazu, the 1986 debut album by American model and singer-songwriter Rosie Vela. In the early ’90s, he toured with The New York Rock and Soul Revue, a musical project directed by Fagen’s future wife Libby Titus. In addition to Becker, it included other prominent musicians, such as Michael McDonald, Boz Scaggs and blues singer Charles Brown.

Kamakiriad was produced by Becker. Revolving around the concept of a journey in a high-tech car, the album illustrates Fagen’s attraction to futuristic themes, similar to I.G.Y. Though oftentimes, one cannot be sure whether he means things seriously or is being ironic. Following the release, he reunited with Becker for a tour to support the album. While the record received a Grammy nomination and peaked at no. 10 on the U.S. Billboard 200 and at no. 3 on the UK Albums Chart, its commercial performance was poor. That’s a pity, since it’s actually a pretty good album. Here’s the opener Trans-Island Skyway – just love the groove of this tune!

Following his reunification with Becker, Fagen co-produced Becker’s 1994 solo debut 11 Tracks Of Whack. He also played keyboards on the album. In 2000, Fagen and Becker released Two Against Nature, their first studio album as Steely Dan in two decades. The follow-up Everything Must Go appeared in June 2003. It was Steely Dan’s last studio album.

In March 2006, Fagen released his third solo record Morph The Cat, in which Becker had no involvement. The record was generally well received and won a Grammy Award For Best Surround Sound Album. Here’s a clip of H Gang. The guitar work and the tenor sax solo by Steely Dan’s Jon Herrington and Walt Weiskopf, respectively absolutely shine.

Following the appearance of Morph The Cat, Steely Dan resumed regular touring. In June 2008, Becker’s second studio album Circus Money came out. Sunken Condos, Fagen’s fourth and most recent studio record, was released in October 2012. Another well-received album, Sunken Condos peaked at no. 12 on the Billboard 200. Here’s what’s probably my favorite tune from that album, Weather In My Head. Love the blues groove of that tune!

During an in-depth interview with Rolling Stone’s podcast Music Now last month, Fagen confirmed he wants to continue touring as long as possible. He added, “It keeps you young, for sure, touring. I noticed when I’m off, I don’t feel as good as when I’m on. I got to be either recording or touring. I especially enjoy live performing more than I used to. We have a fantastic band. I got a couple of fantastic bands. It’s just so much fun to be with these guys and to play.”

One of these bands is called The Nightflyers, four young musicians Fagen has worked with over the past few years. They are Connor Kennedy (guitar, vocals), Lee Falco (drums, vocals), Brandon Morrison (bass, vocals) and Will Bryant (keyboards, vocals). Here’s a clip of them performing the title track of The Nightfly album, captured during a concert in Cincinnati last year.

Last Saturday, Steely Dan and The Doobie Brothers announced a co-headlining 37-gig North American 2018 summer tour. It’s scheduled to kick off in Charlotte, N.C. on May 10 and conclude on July 14 in Bethel, N.Y. One of the shows (July 6) is right in my backyard at PNC Bank Arts Center in Holmdel, N.J. Unfortunately, I haven’t seen Steely Dan and imaging them without Becker is still hard. The Doobies, which I also really dig, have had many changes in their lineup since their heyday in the ’70s. Still, I’m very tempted!

Sources: Wikipedia, Rolling Stone, Steely Dan website, YouTube

Clips & Pix: Billy Idol/Rebel Yell (Unplugged)

Even you don’t like Billy Idol or don’t think Rebel Yell is a particularly compelling tune, if you’re into rock music, how can you not dig the above unplugged version?

The clip was captured during Idol’s performance on the VH1 Storytellers series in April 2001. Regardless of whether you play guitar or not, it’s not difficult to figure out that Idol’s longtime ace guitarist Steve Stevens is absolutely killing it with just an acoustic guitar. Frankly, it doesn’t feel like anything is missing – no drums, no bass and no keyboards needed, not mention a second guitar!

Co-written by Idol and Stevens, Rebel Yell is the title track of Idol’s November 1983 studio album, his second. The song also appeared separately as the record’s lead single in October that year. Upon its initial release, it was only moderately successful, reaching no. 62 on the UK Singles Chart, while peaking at no. 46 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100. However, a 1985 re-issue made it all the way to no. 6 on the UK chart.

Sources: Wikipedia, YouTube

What I’ve Been Listening To: Neil Young & Promise Of The Real/ The Visitor

Not ready to fade away, Young is still feisty after more than five decades

Oftentimes, I enjoy blogging about music the most when it’s spontaneous! This morning, I had no idea I would end up writing about Neil Young’s latest studio album. While if anything I now dig the man more than ever, it’s probably fair to assume we’ve seen his finest work. I mean how can you possibly trump gems like Harvest, Live Rust and Harvest Moon, to name three of his albums that come to my mind right away?

So how the heck did I end up with The Visitor? While listening to The Rolling Stones’ Exit On Main Street during breakfast, which BTW is great music for waking up, I was looking at Facebook pictures from Decade, a Neil Young tribute band I really like. Readers of the blog will probably remember the name, since I’ve covered them on various previous occasions.

Decade had their first gig of the year last night, which I unfortunately missed. So I gave a thumbs-up to the nice photos and lead guitarist Joey Herr’s red SG, one of the coolest looking Gibson models, in my opinion. I also told them their Facebook post made me feel like putting on some Neil. And so I did. Blame Apple Music for showing me The Visitor first as the “Latest Release!”

Neil Young & Promise Of The Real

Leading up to the appearance of Young’s 39th studio album on December 1, 2017, I had casually listened to Already Great, one of two singles that came out prior to the record. While I didn’t think it was a bad tune, frankly, I wasn’t very impressed either. So when queuing up The Visitor after I was done with Exile this morning, I didn’t have particularly high expectations. To say it right upfront, the record isn’t on par with the above named albums. Yet, I was still pleasantly surprised that after 50-plus years in the music business, it’s obvious that Young has fire left in the belly!

The Visitor kicks off with the grungy sounding Already Great. When Young sings, Woke up this morning/Thinking ’bout you/And your new deal/(My American friend), there is no doubt who he is referring to. The song’s chorus also leaves no ambiguity how Young feels about the U.S.: Already great/You’re already great/You’re the promise land/You’re the helping hand. Credited to him and producer John Hanlon, it’s safe to assume the lyrics won’t endear him to all Americans, which is also true for the remainder of the record. But Young has always been outspoken (think Southern Man, for example), so I doubt he’ll get sleepless nights over it.

As I started listening to the acoustic Almost Always, I was like, ‘wait a minute, I know this melody.’ It didn’t take me long to figure it out: From Hank To Hendrix, one of my favorite tracks from the Harvest Moon album. And before I knew it, another piece from that record popped up: part of the guitar theme from Unknown Legend – kind of clever how Young mixed the two! Again, when it comes to the lyrics, it’s pretty clear what he is talking about: And I’m living with a gameshow host/Who has to brag and has to boast/’Bout tearing down/The things I hold dear.

Stand Tall is another grungy rocker. The lyrics take on the science deniers and the sad fact that their ignorance is now endorsed at the highest levels of power: Boy king don’t believe in science/It goes against the big money truth/This playpen is full of deniers/To flush our future down the tubes.

Perhaps the most peculiar track on the album is Carnival. It starts with Young laughing like he’s lost his mind. Then he describes what sounds like memories of a past visit to a carnival. Bongos and background vocalists singing carnival, carnival give the tune a Latin feel. Young also throws in elements of carnival music. It’s a somewhat weird and catchy tune at the same time. Listen for yourself!

And just when you think you’ve basically figured out the record, Young throws in a blues called Diggin’ A Hole.

The last track I’d like to call out is Children Of Destiny, the record’s lead single that was released on July 4, 2017. The timing certainly wasn’t a coincidence. It feels like a companion to Already Great and that Young essentially is saying it’s up to the young generation to keep the country that way: Stand up for what you believe/Resist the powers that be/Preserve the land and save the seas/For the children of destiny/The children of you and me.

Unlike the Shocking Pinks, a band made up for Young’s 1983 studio album Everybody’s Rockin’, Promise Of The Real is, well, a real band. Its members are Lukas Nelson (vocals/guitar), Anthony Logerfo (drums), Corey McCormick (bass) and Tato Melgar (percussion). Lukas is a son of Willie Nelson, the country music legend. Also playing on the album is Willie’s second son from his current marriage, Micah Nelson. Promise Of The Real also backed Young on his 36th studio album The Monsanto Years, which came out in 2015, and the tour that supported the record.

Is The Visitor likely to get Young new listeners? I doubt it – in fact, given how divided the country is, it may actually piss off some of the folks who have enjoyed listening to him in the past. While this album certainly feels more political than most of Young’s previous records, his true fans have always known that he doesn’t shy away from expressing his opinions. I’m definitely a part of that group. And I love the fact that Young still embraces these lines he composed many moons ago: My my, hey hey/Rock and roll is here to stay/It’s better to burn out/Than to fade away/My my, hey hey.

Sources: Wikipedia, YouTube

What I’ve Been Listening To: Little River Band/Little River Band

A compelling yet underappreciated debut by Australian rock band

From the very first time I heard It’s A Long Way There, I thought the combination of smooth harmonizing vocals, a catchy melody and crunchy rock guitars made for a terrific song. The tune by the Little River Band is from their eponymous debut album.

Not only do they often remind me of the Eagles and the Doobie Brothers on their records released between the mid-70s and early 80s, but I also feel many tracks from that period are on par with music by those two American bands. Yet while the Little River Band (later also called LRB) enjoyed success in their native Australia from the get-go, it took them longer to get attention internationally.

LRB emerged from folk rock group Mississippi and was formed in Melbourne, Australia in March 1975. The band’s initial lineup, which after the first two albums underwent numerous changes over the years, included Glenn Shorrock (lead vocals), Graham Davidge (lead guitar), Beeb Birtles (guitar, vocals), Graham Goble (vocals, guitar), Dave Orams (bass) and Derek Pellicci (drums). LRB’s debut was released in November 1975.

The album opens with the gem It’s A Long Way There. Written By Goble, it clocks in at 8:44 minutes. While this certainly didn’t make it radio-friendly, I think this tune is pretty much as close to rock perfection as its gets for the above mentioned reasons. A shortened version appeared separately as the record’s third single.

Next up is Curiosity Killed The Cat. Funny title. It’s also how I sometimes feel about my cats! The tune, which was written by Birtles, has a nice soft and funky groove. Like the opener, LRB also released in separately in September 1975 as the album’s lead single.

Meanwhile is another nice rocker. The tune was written by Shorrock. I particularly dig the electric guitar harmony parts, especially the extended solo that starts at 1:45 min. Almost reminds me a bit of Thin Lizzy.

I’ll Always Call Your Name is a lovely ballad written by Birtles. One thing that stands out to me is a nice slide guitar solo starting at about 2:00 min. The other thing is the part that immediately follows thereafter, which is more rock-oriented – it’s almost a little song within the song.

The last track I’d like to call out is Emma, another tune written by Shorrock. It has an upbeat, joyous feel to it and also features nice electric guitar harmonies.

Little River Band reached no. 12 on the Australian Kent Music Report Albums chart in 1975, a pretty impressive showing for a debut album. In the U.S., the record fared more moderately, peaking at no. 60 on the Billboard 200 in 1976. Curiosity Killed The Cat was the most successful single in Australia, climbing to no. 15 on the Kent Music Report Singles chart. Interestingly, It’s A Long Way There only reached no. 35 there. In the U.S., on the other hand, the tune climbed to no. 28 on the Billboard Hot 100. Another charting single there was I’ll Always Call Your Name, which reached no. 62.

LRB went on to become one of Australia’s most significant bands that has sold more than 30 million records. A version that doesn’t include any of the founding members continues to perform to this day. Current lead singer and bassist Wayne Nelson first joined LRB in 1980, when original members Shorrock, Birtles, Goble and Pellicci were still part of the lineup. Nelson also sang lead on The Night Owls, which became one of the band’s hit singles. But due to the lack of original members some people regard LRB’s current lineup essentially as a cover band.

Sources: Wikipedia, YouTube

 

Clips & Pix: Joe Jackson/Is She Really Going Out With Him? (A Capella)

Inspired by Music Enthusiast’s previous post about Joe Jackson, a great artist I had not listened to in a while, I revisited some of his albums. While doing that, I came across Live 1980/86, a compilation of tracks from four tours spanning the early to mid-80s. Among many terrific tracks, it features three different versions of Is She Really Going Out With Him?, including the above killer a capella take.

As is typically the case with Jackson’s original music, he wrote the music and lyrics to Is She Really Going Out With Him? The tune was the lead single to his debut studio album Look Sharp, which appeared in March 1979. When it initially came out in September 1978, the single didn’t chart in the UK or the U.S. That changed when it was reissued in the wake of the album and peaked at no. 13 and no. 21 on the UK Singles Chart and the U.S. Billboard Hot 100, respectively.

Sources: Wikipedia, YouTube

What I’ve Been Listening To: Kat Wright/By My Side

Vermont soul singer has been called “frighteningly good”

Chances are you haven’t heard of Kat Wright. I certainly had not until I spotted her name in the lineup of artists for an upcoming show at City Winery in New York City I’m considering to attend. After listening to By My Side, I’m very impressed about the 31-year-old vocalist from Vermont. While Boston Public Radio’s declaration that she’s “frighteningly good” is pretty bold, it may not be exaggerated.

Backed by a great-sounding seven-piece band that used to be called The Indomitable Soul Band, Wright’s music is reminiscent of Stax and Motown style soul, my kind of music! I think it’s very cool and courageous when a relatively new and young artist embraces what essentially is old-fashioned music recorded during an era that required true craftsmanship, including real singing and real instruments – such a refreshing contrast to the largely soulless, computer-generated stuff that sadly dominates much of today’s charts.

Kat Wright & The Indomitable Soul Band

Wright and the band got together in December 2010. They released their debut in 2013, a six-track EP appropriately titled Introducing. According to a Burlington Free Press story, the band then proceeded to record a full-length follow-up record. But they didn’t release it, feeling it didn’t represent the artistic leap they were looking for. Fast-forward to November 2016, when that feat became reality with the appearance of By My Side. Time to get to some music!

The album opens with the title track that immediately sets the tone for the record. The way the horns and the keyboard are played gives it a sound that is retro yet doesn’t come across as dusty – very cool!

Come Dance has a Four Tops Can’t Help Myself type of groove that just makes you want to get up and dance. Again, I dig the horns and the keyboards on that tune.

The Light is an example of a song that sounds less like Stax and Motown and more psychedelic. It’s an illustration of how Wright described the band’s artistic aspirations to the Burlington Free Press. “I don’t want to be stuck in soul-band land,” she said. “For us, soul is the starting place, it’s not the ending place.”

On Who’s Your Fool the sound is back to retro style soul. The singing, the horns, the groove – I just love everything about this tune!

The last track I’d like to highlight is The River, which blends soul and blues elements and features some nice slide guitar playing.

By My Side was recorded in just one week by Joel Hamilton, a co-owner of Studio G in Brooklyn, New York. According to the studio’s website, Hamilton is a four-time Grammy nominated producer and engineer, who has worked with Tom Waits, Iggy Pop and Elvis Costello, among other artists. Wright largely credits him for the record. “They let Joel be the boss, they let him be the producer,” Wright stated in the above Burlington Free Press article. “The band really rallied around trust and respect for the producer and making a really beautiful album.”

In addition to Wright, the members of the band include Bob Wagner (guitar), Josh Weinstein (bass), Ezra Oklan (drums), Shane Hardiman (keyboards), Luke LaPlant (baritone saxophone), Jake Whitesell (tenor saxophone) and Dave Purcell (trumpet). Prior to the album’s release, Wright and the band decided to drop “The Indomitable Soul Band” from their name – probably a smart decision, given they apparently don’t want to get boxed into the soul label.

Initially becoming a staple on the Burlington music scene, the band has since branched out and also performed in other Eastern U.S. states. Currently, their website lists three upcoming gigs, which in addition to City Winery (Jan 13) include Jam Cruise (Miami, Fla., Jan 17) and Quai Des Brumes (Montreal, Canada, Feb 17). BTW, another relatively new soul band that excites me, Southern Avenue, will also play City Winery on Jan 13, along with various other artists. That’s how I found out about Wright.

Sources: Wikipedia, Kat Wright Facebook page and website, Burlington Free Press, Studio G Brooklyn website, YouTube

The Softer Side Of Led Zeppelin

A list of some of my favorite softer Zep tunes

Apart from crunchy rockers like Good Times Bad Times, Whole Lotta Love and Black Dog, Led Zeppelin has recorded a number of softer, oftentimes more acoustically-focused tracks. I was reminded of this earlier today when listening to Thank You and thought it would be fun to put together a list of such tunes I like in particular.

Your Time Is Gonna Come (Led Zeppelin, 1969)

Written by John Paul Jones, Jimmy Page and Robert Plant, Your Time Is Gonna Come appeared on Zep’s eponymous debut album. According to Wikipedia, on this ballad about an unfaithful girl, Page used an out-of-tune Fender 10-string steel guitar. The amazing church-like-sounding organ was played by Jones, who used a pedal for the bass line. Rarely has a combination of a Hammond and out-of-tune steel guitar sounded so beautiful to me!

Thank You (Led Zeppelin II, 1969)

This gem is from the band’s second studio album and is credited to Plant and Page. The sound of Jones’ Hammond organ is similar to Your Time Is Gonna Come. The song is a tribute to Plant’s then-wife Maureen Wilson and was the first Zep tune, for which he wrote the entire lyrics.

Tangerine (Led Zeppelin III, 1970)

Composed by Page, this folk-rock ballad was included on Led Zeppelin’s third studio album. According to Wikipedia, the song’s origins date back to Page’s time with the Yardbirds when that band recorded a demo of a tune called Knowing That I’m Losing You in April 1968, which sounds very similar to Tangerine.

The Battle Of Evermore (Led Zeppelin IV, 1971)

This beautiful folk duet sung by Plant and English singer-songwriter Alexandra Elene MacLean Denny (Sandy Denny) is one of the highlights of Zeppelin’s catalog, in my opinion. Credited to Page and Plant, The Battle Of Evermore features Page on mandolin and Jones on acoustic guitar. During a 1977 interview with Dave Schulps, senior editor of Trouser Press, Page explained the tune “was made up on the spot by Robert and myself. I just picked up John Paul Jones’s mandolin, never having played a mandolin before, and just wrote up the chords and the whole thing in one sitting.” It appears Page was a quick learner!

The Rain Song (Houses Of The Holy, 1973)

This more than seven-and-a-half-minute ballad, which was written by Page and Plant, is from Zep’s fourth studio album. One of the tune’s characteristic features is a Mellotron keyboard played by Jones, which helps create the soft orchestral sound.

All My Love (In Through The Out Door, 1979)

As previously noted here, I think All My Love is the highlight of In Through The Out Door, Led Zeppelin’s eighth and final album prior to the death of drummer John Bonham. Written by Jones and Plant, the tune prominently features a Yamaha GX-1, which Jones had just bought from Keith Emerson. I totally dig the sound of this polyphonic synthesizer.

Sources: Wikipedia, Trouser Press, YouTube

Clips & Pix: Johnny Cash/I’ve Been Everywhere

Can you sing 20-plus North American cities and other locations at break-neck speed in one song verse? Some artists did. Johnny Cash was one of them. I was reminded of The Man In Black, when I saw a post earlier today from fellow music blogger hotfox63 about the tune Jackson.

Written by Australian county singer Geoff Mack in 1959, I’ve Been Everywhere was made popular in 1962 by Leslie Morrison, professionally known as Lucky Star, another artist from Down Under. The original version included Australian towns and was later adapted by Canadian country artist Hank Snow for North America.

Cash recorded his version of the tune for the 1996 album Unchained, the 86th record in his catalog! Although country music generally is not my first preference, I think there was something special about Cash with his deep bass-baritone voice. I also dig this particular song, which is a nice country-rockabilly cross-over.

Sources: Wikipedia, YouTube

Clips & Pix: The Rolling Stones/Can’t You Hear Me Knocking

The above clip of Can’t You Hear Me Knocking is from Sticky Fingers Live At The Fonda Theatre 2015, which a close friend mentioned earlier today when we chatted about music. Somehow I had missed this latest addition to the From The Vault series by The Rolling Stones, when it was released in September 2017.

It captures the Stones before a relatively tiny audience of 1,200 people at The Fonda Theatre in Hollywood on May 20, 2015, where they played the entire Sticky Fingers album live. The show celebrated the reissue of the 1971 record, which is widely considered as one of the Stones’ best albums, and also marked the opening night of their two-month Zip Code Tour.

While the Stones have played shows at small venues to warm up for stadium tours in the past, oftentimes only announced at the very last minute, this was the first and so far the only time they performed Sticky Fingers live in its entirety. They also threw in some additional tunes.

Like most tracks on the original studio album, Can’t You Hear Me Knocking was co-written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards. In the above clip, Ronnie Wood and saxophonist Karl Denson do a fantastic job playing the parts of Mick Taylor and Bobby Keys, respectively. In fact, the entire band truly rocks!

Sources: Wikipedia, http://www.stonesfromthevault.com, YouTube