Clips & Pix: The Rolling Stones/Brown Sugar

This killer version of Brown Sugar by The Rolling Stones is from Sticky Fingers Live At The Fonda Theatre 2015. In early January, I posted another clip, Can’t You Hear Me Knocking, from this album, which appeared in September 2017 as part of the band’s From The Vault series.

The Stones’ dynamic during their performance before an audience of some 1,200 people at The Fonda Theatre in Hollywood on May 20, 2015 was through the roof. You can also see how much fun they had. This was clearly not some routine gig. These guys left their hearts and souls on that stage!

Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, Brown Sugar is the opener of the 1971 Sticky Fingers album, which the above show celebrated. By the way, it remains the only gig to date, during which The Stones performed what was their ninth British and 11th U.S. studio record in its entirety.

Brown Sugar was also released in April 1971 as the album’s lead single and became the 6th Stones single to top the U.S. Billboard Hot 100. It would take until August 1973 before they scored another no. 1 in the U.S. with Angie. In the UK, Brown Sugar peaked at no. 2 on the Singles Chart. Rolling Stone ranked the tune at no. 5 on its 100 Greatest Guitar Songs Of All Time list.

Sources: Wikipedia, http://www.stonesfromthevault.com, YouTube

New Jimi Hendrix Album Exclusively Available At NPR For Streaming

Earlier this evening, I saw on Facebook that Both Sides Of The Sky, the forthcoming posthumous album by Jimi Hendrix, is now available exclusively at NPR for streaming. I’m currently listening to the collection of tracks recorded in 1968 and 1969, and definitely like what I’m hearing. The first three tunes, Mannish Boy, Lover Man and Hear My Train A Coming, already were officially released over the past six weeks. I previously wrote about them here, here and here.

Based on what I’ve heard so far, I think the lead to NPR’s accompanying review hits the nail on the head: “At this point, some 47 years after Jimi Hendrix’s death, it’s probably unrealistic to expect that a set of deep-vault studio tracks can expand the guitarist’s legacy in any meaningful way. This no doubt dismays the Hendrix obsessives, who pine for the long-whispered-about radical experiments they believe Hendrix squirreled away in some Electric Ladyland broom closet. For the rest of us, the arrival of any sort of Hendrix material, especially if it’s captured in the studio, is a chance to be awed, all over again and in surprising ways, by this human’s freakish powers of musical persuasion.”

Thus far, my favorite tunes include Mannish Boy, $20 Fine (a Stephen Stills tune with him on vocals), Things I Used To Do (nice slide guitar shredder with Johnny Winter), Georgia Blues (slow blues featuring Lonnie Youngblood on saxophone) and the Joni Mitchell classic Woodstock, another song featuring Stills. While the last track is “missing” the magic vocal harmonies of Crosby, Still, Nash & Young, I still dig this version, which features Hendrix jamming on bass and superb organ work.

Both Sides Of The Sky is set for release on March 9.

Sources: Tom Moon, NPR: First Listen: Jimi Hendrix, ‘Both Sides Of The Sky’

Clips & Pix: Buddy Guy & B.B. King/Stay Around A Little Longer

Earlier this week, I spotted this great clip on the website of the B.B. King Blues Club & Grill in New York City, where I will be in mid-April to see Buddy Guy. Sadly, his partner in the recording B.B. King passed away in May 2015 at the age of 89. While it will be my second time for Guy, unfortunately, I never saw King.

Written by Tom Hambridge and Gary Nicholson, Stay Around A Little Longer was recorded for Guy’s 15th studio album Living Proof from October 2010. In addition, the tune appeared separately as a single just prior to the release of the record, which was produced by Hambridge who also played drums and percussion.

The moving lyrics are a dialogue between King and Guy, who express their gratitude for the life each has had and mutual appreciation. Admittedly, when I watched this clip the other day, I found myself tearing up a bit, especially at King’s line, When I’m pushing up daisies, don’t forget/You’re still my buddy. The soul that comes across in this song and these words is just beautiful – this is music at its finest!

Sources: B.B. King Blues Club & Grill website, Wikipedia, YouTube

Clips & Pix: R-E-S-P-E-C-T

There is perhaps no other vocalist like Aretha Franklin. Now in her mid-70s, the Queen of Soul still sounds terrific. The above clip of Respect was captured during a show last May at NYCB Theatre at Westbury in Westbury, N.Y.

Respect was written by Otis Redding, who also first recorded and released the tune in 1965. But it was Franklin’s version from 1967, which became a major hit and her signature song when it appeared in April that year as the second single from her 11th studio album I Never Loved A Man The Way I Love You.

Franklin is still performing, though in February 2017, she announced she would retire from touring at the end of last year. In August, Franklin told the Detroit Free Press she planned to open a nightclub where she would occasionally sing. Currently, her official website lists four scheduled shows for this year.

One of the gigs is coming up on March 25 at New Jersey Performing Arts Center in Newark. That’s way too close to my house not show her some r-e-s-p-e-c-t. Apparently, it was not too early to get tickets for what may be one of the last opportunities to see Franklin in the New York-New Jersey-Connecticut tri-state are. The show is almost sold out!

Sources: Wikipedia, Setlist.fm, Detroit Free Press, YouTube