Another Posthumous Album Highlights Some of Tom Petty’s Most Productive Years

“Angel Dream” is reconfigured and remastered 25th anniversary version of 1996 “She’s the One” soundtrack album

While I would call myself a Tom Petty fan and dearly miss him, I’m mostly familiar with his catalog until 1994. Except for his final album with the Heartbreakers, Hypnotic Eye, my knowledge gets spotty when it comes to anything Petty released after his second solo album Wildflowers, alone or together with his longtime band. Among the latter was the August 1996 soundtrack Songs and Music from the Motion Picture “She’s the One”. That changed over the past few days with Angel Dream, a reconfigured and remastered 25th anniversary edition released on July 2. Listening to the anniversary issue not only led me to check out the original, but also to discover Tom Petty music I really like.

Officially titled Angel Dream (Songs and Music from the Motion Picture “She’s the One”), the latest Tom Petty posthumous release is being characterized as a “reimagined reissue.” This 25th anniversary edition keeps eight tunes of the original album, eliminates seven and adds four previously unreleased songs. As such, I’m okay with the characterization. But I can also see how some music fans like hotfox63 view the “reimagined reissue” label as a cynical marketing gimmick. Whatever the main motives behind a reissue may be, I think there can be no doubt that money is always part of the equation. Notably, Petty was involved in working on the mixes for Angel Dream with his longtime engineer and co-producer Ryan Ulate prior to his untimely death in October 2017.

I’d like to start this review with Angel Dream (No. 2), the album’s beautiful opener, a tune that also appeared on the original edition. During a recent interview on SiriusXM’s Tom Petty Radio (channel 31), Heartbreakers co-founder and keyboarder Benmont Tench called it “one of the loveliest songs Tom ever wrote,” as transcribed in this Rock Cellar Magazine review. Essentially, Angel Dream (No. 2) bookends the album, with the second bookend being an instrumental reprise titled French Disconnection, one of the previously unreleased tracks.

Among the highlights of the original album and this reissue is Change the Locks, a tune written by Lucinda Williams, which she recorded for her 1988 eponymous third studio album under the slightly different title Changed the Locks. Petty’s cover is more straight rock than the more bluesy original. Nice!

One of Life’s Little Mysteries is among the previously unreleased tracks. The song’s jazzy groove reminds me a bit of Full Grown Body, a tune from the aforementioned Hypnotic Eye. The music certainly fits the lyrics. An excerpt: Go to work in the morning/Try to make a buck/Do everything you’re told/And you’re still outta luck/It’s one of life’s little mysteries…

Here’s another cool cover and previously unreleased track: Thirteen Days, a J.J. Cale tune included on his fifth studio album 5 that came out in August 1979. “We had a lot of fun playing that song live and it’s great to have a recording of it from the studio,” said Mike Campbell, ex-Heartbreakers guitarist, during the above SiriusXM interview. I can definitely see why!

The last song I’d like to call out is yet another previously unreleased tune: 105 Degrees, which also is the album’s lead single. I realize I already covered this song in my last Best of What’s New installment, but since it’s an early favorite, I simply couldn’t skip it. I just love how this tune is shuffling along!

“‘She’s The One’ was originally a great way to include some of the songs that didn’t make it on to Wildflowers, but it has its own thing to it, its own charm, and putting it out now in a restructured form makes for a sweet little treat,” Benmont further noted. “At the time in the studio, it was fun working as a band to improvise the scoring cues for the movie rather than playing to preset click tracks and a written score. And it was interesting to try to cut covers of others’ songs for a record, instead of learning covers just for live shows.”

Here’s another tidbit I learned about “She’s the One” when doing some research for this post. It’s only album by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers that was recorded without an official drummer. The studio sessions happened following the departure of the band’s original drummer Stan Lynch. The album featured contributions from three other drummers: Curt Bisquera, Ringo Starr and Steve Ferrone. Ferrone, who had also played on Wildflowers, became the official drummer of the Heartbreakers shortly after “She’s the One” had been recorded.

Angel Dream (Songs and Music from the Motion Picture She's the One) CD – Tom  Petty
CD softpak with 12-page booklet.

“These songs are extremely special,” added Petty’s widow Dana Petty, who together with their two daughters Adria and Annakim manages the Tom Petty estate. “I am grateful this record is getting the recognition it deserves. The remix Ryan Ulyate did sounds amazing, and the unreleased gems are a lovely bonus. Annakim, Adria, and I took a lot of time finding artwork that reflects the mood of the album. I think we finally achieved that with Alia Penner’s work. It is surreal and beautiful, just like life during that time.”

Angel Dream, which appears on Warner Records and is available in CD and vinyl formats, as well as in digital music platforms, is the fifth posthumous Tom Petty album. It is also the third album with a connection to Wildflowers, widely considered to be one of Petty’s best records. October 2020 saw the release of Wildflowers & All the Rest. The super deluxe edition of that reissue, titled Finding Wildflowers, included a disc featuring alternate versions of Wildflowers’ 15 tracks, plus You Saw Me Comin’, a previously unreleased original song. That CD was released as a standalone under the title Finding Wildflowers (Alternate Versions) in April this year.

I will admit the standalone release does smack a bit like a money grab, since they could have offered it as a separate option when Wildflowers & All the Rest came out. Instead, they waited for six months. In the meantime, if fans wanted to own the alternate versions and that new song, they needed to buy the whole enchilada. I wonder how Tom Petty would have felt about that. After all, he once successfully battled his label MCA when they wanted to sell his then-latest record Damn the Torpedoes at a premium price of $9.98 instead of the usual list price of $8.98.

Sources: Wikipedia; Tom Petty website; Rock Cellar Magazine; YouTube

9 thoughts on “Another Posthumous Album Highlights Some of Tom Petty’s Most Productive Years”

  1. I try not to think of the money part…yea it probably is but as long as they don’t hold a gun to us and make us buy it…I’m ok with it. It’s nice to hear new songs by Petty that we never heard. I like the JJ Cale song a lot.

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  2. I can feel hotfox63, but maybe I would do the same should Bruce Springsteen go to Heaven and jam with the Rock’n’Roll Big Band.

    There are only few tunes of Tom Petty I like but “Walls (Circus)” is one of my favorites.

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  3. Wow, Petty died four years ago and already five money gra – er, albums. Well, they’ve been releasing Hendrix shit since 1970. That aside, I like what I heard. In some of these I say, does Petty sound like Dylan or does Dylan sound like Petty?

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    1. Agree, Jim, they certainly have been busy issuing Tom Petty posthumous albums. Ultimately, it’s up to people whether they want to buy these albums.

      I’m just happy to listen to Tom Petty’s music, especially the previously unreleased tracks. Since I already have access via my streaming music provider, that’s how I’m continuing to do it.

      As for the similarity to Dylan, I think you’re on to something. In fact, I read the same observation in one of the album reviews. Sadly, I can’t remember where!

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      1. Those first couple tunes sounded Dylanesque. Recall they were fellow Wilburys. Sadly, only Jeff Lynne and Dylan remain from that unit.

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  4. I listened through everything last year – I thought Echo from 1999 was very good. He kind of faded a little in the mid 1980s but roared right back with Full Moon Fever and kept up that second wave of career momentum for a decade. The original She’s The One artwork was amusing – a photo of Jennifer Aniston at the height of her fame next to a gnarled Petty.

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    1. It seems you’re really good about listening to entire music catalogs. Oftentimes, I just don’t have the patience or time – or a combination of the two! As such, I’m mostly familiar with the first half of Tom Perry’s catalog (up until 1994/Wildflowers).

      When it comes to Jennifer Aniston and romantic comedies, I can’t imagine Tom Petty was into any of them. Which kind of makes it peculiar that he agreed to write a score for a comedy!

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