Clips & Pix: Ringo Starr/Rock Around the Clock

Did the world need this cover of Rock Around the Clock? Probably not. Did Ringo Starr reinvent classic rock & roll with it? Nope. Do I still love it? Hell, yes!!! In fact, when I saw the clip earlier this afternoon, it put a big smile on my face and literally made my day. This is what Ringo excels at – using his positivity and making people happy. I hope you find it as much fun as I did, which is why I wanted share this as soon as I could.

Here’s what Ringo said on his website about the song, for which the official video was released today. “Yes let’s rock! This track takes me back – rock and roll memories from when I was about to turn 15. I’d been in hospital with tuberculosis for a year or so, where I’d already spent my 7th and 14th birthdays, and I didn’t want to spend another one there again. I was doing well, so my mother talked to the doctors, and they agreed to let me out.”

Ringo’s website further notes he first heard Rock Around the Clock in the film Blackboard Jungle, which his grandparents took him to see for his 15th birthday. “I’m sitting there, I’d been in the hospital, don’t know much about what’s going on lately, and they ripped up the cinema!!!,” he recalled. “They just threw the chairs and went crazy. I thought, ‘WOW this is great!!!!’ I remember that moment like it was yesterday, it was incredible. And the song just rocks. So when it came to choosing tracks for this EP I thought of doing ‘Rock Around the Clock’ for all these good reasons.”

Ringo’s cover of Rock Around the Clock was first included on his recent EP Change the World that appeared on September 22. He got a little help from some friends, who in this case most notably include guitarist Joe Walsh. Watching him rockin’ out only adds to the fun. He’s also a bit of a goofball!

Written in 1952 by Max Freedman and James Myers (credited as Jimmy De Knight), Rock Around the Clock was recorded by Bill Haley & His Comets and released as a single in May 1954. It became the best known and most successful rendition of the tune. Topping the mainstream charts in the U.S., UK and Australia, the tune also was Haley’s biggest hit.

Sources: Wikipedia; Ringo Starr website; YouTube

Clips & Pix: The Rolling Stones & Buddy Guy/Champaign & Reefer

Earlier this week, I found myself in blues heaven. More specifically, I had rented Buddy Guy: The Blues Chase the Blues Away, an excellent documentary about Guy’s life. One of the great scenes (and there are many of them!) is an excerpt from Shine a Light, the 2008 Rolling Stones concert film directed by Martin Scorsese, showing the Stones perform with Buddy Guy, which is also captured in the great clip below.

The footage shows the Stones and Guy playing Champagne & Reefer, a Muddy Waters tune. Check out the interaction between them – it’s just fascinating! Sure, part of it is show, but you can feel how excited the Stones are to play with one of their blues heroes. And the joy is mutual.

Waters included Champagne & Reefer on his final studio album King Bee from 1981. The producer was none other than Johnny Winter who had also produced Waters’ two previous studio albums.

Muddy Waters - King Bee - Amazon.com Music

The Rolling Stones, along with other British artists like Eric Clapton and Jeff Beck, have been huge fans of American blues artists like Guy, Waters and Howlin’ Wolf, to name a few, and like to play their songs. It’s hard to believe there was a time when these blues luminaries were largely unknown in America outside of Chicago, even though they had performed and recorded there for many years. The Stones, Clapton and Beck were instrumental to raise their popularity in this country, something Guy also stresses in the documentary.

Buddy Guy: The Blues Chase the Blues Away certainly deserves its own post, and I hope I’ll get to it one of these days. For now, I can refer you to Amazon where the film is available for rent. I watched it three times within the 3-day span the rental covers. If you dig Guy and the blues, I can highly recommend it.

Sources: Wikipedia; Buddy Guy: The Blues Chase the Blues Away (Devin Amar, Matt Mitchener, Charles Todd – 2021); YouTube

Clips & Pix: Sihasin/We the People

Sihasin is an indigenous music project of Clayson Benally (bass) and Jeneda Benally (drums). According to their website, the siblings are from the Diné (Navajo) Nation in Northern Arizona. Sihasin, which means hope in the Diné language, combine punk rock, folk, world music and pop with Navajo rhythm in their music and songs that aim to empower and inspire others to bring change and social justice.

The above clip captures their most recent single We the People, which premiered digitally on July 4, 2021 in each American embassy. Previously, Sihasin had been selected by American Music Abroad, a cultural diplomacy program that shares American music internationally and that is sponsored by the U.S. State Department.

Clayson and Jeneda got their start in music as teenagers in 1989 when they formed punk rock group Blackfire, together with their brother Klee Benally (guitar, vocals). Sihasin was founded in 2012 after Blackfire stopped being active. The band remains on hiatus.

Happy Indigenous Peoples’ Day!

Sources: Wikipedia; Sihasin website; YouTube

Clips & Pix: Tom Petty/You Wreck Me

A tweet from Rolling Stone I saw earlier this morning reminded me it’s been four years since we’ve lost Tom Petty, who passed away on October 2, 2017 at the age of 66. If you’re a more frequent visitor of the blog, you probably know how much I dig Tom and how much I miss him, both as a great songwriter and as a no BS artist.

How many other music artists can you name who battled their record company over an attempted price increase for their album (Hard Promises, 1981) because the label thought music fans would simply absorb it? Tom resented the “superstar pricing”, which would have raised the price by one dollar – admittedly, a small amount, especially from today’s perspective. But it rubbed Tom the wrong way and he pushed back, literally practicing what he would sing eight years later: I Won’t Back Down. Eventually, the label abandoned the plan!

Tom has penned so many great songs that it’s hard to pick one. Here’s You Wreck Me, co-written by him and Heartbreakers guitarist Mike Campbell. It’s from Tom’s second solo album Wildflowers released in November 1994. He was backed by all members of the Heartbreakers except for drummer Stan Lynch. Instead it was Steve Ferrone on the skins, who would become the band’s official drummer in 1995.

Sources: Wikipedia; Rolling Stone; YouTube

Clips & Pix: Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band/You Never Can Tell

I have to credit fellow blogger Music Enthusiast and his latest post about the forthcoming release of Bruce Springsteen’s The Legendary 1979 No Nukes Concerts film, and I suppose serendipity. When I looked up the film trailer on YouTube, I kept it running and the next clip was the above – simply too great not to post it!

Apparently, this footage was captured during a concert Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band played in Leipzig, Germany in July 2013. I just love the improvised feel of this performance. And that piano and these horns truly rock – and so does everybody else on that stage!

Also known as C’est La Vie or Teenage Wedding, You Never Can Tell was written by Chuck Berry in the early ’60s while he was serving a federal prison sentence for alleged sex with a 14-old girl whom he had transported across state lines to work as a hatcheck girl at his club – a pretty dark looking chapter in Berry’s life.

First released in August 1964 as a single, the tune became Berry’s final top 40 hit in the U.S. until the embarrassing My Ding-a-Ling from October 1972, his only mainstream no. 1 hit on the Billboard Hot 100. You Never Can Tell was also included on Berry’s seventh studio album St. Louis to Liverpool that appeared in November 1964.

Sources: Wikipedia; YouTube

Clips & Pix: The Rolling Stones/Get Off Of My Cloud

I’m still in shock about the news from earlier today that Charlie Watts has passed away at the age of 80. No cause of death was provided.

I hate to admit I didn’t have a good feeling when The Rolling Stones’ Twitter feed posted a note on August 5 that Watts would miss their upcoming U.S. No Filter Tour this fall since he “had a procedure, which was completely successful, but…his doctors this week concluded that he now needs proper rest and recuperation.” After all, Watts underwent treatment for throat cancer in 2004. While he apparently beat the cancer, I always felt he looked very frail, especially during the past five years or so.

As I’m writing this, countless obituaries have already been published, so I’m not adding yet another write-up about the unassuming drummer who in many regards was the complete opposite of his flashy bandmates, especially Mick Jagger and Keith Richard – a man who loved jazz and didn’t care about rock & roll stardom and screaming fans. Instead, as I typically do when a beloved artist passes way, I’d like to celebrate their music.

Charlie Watts: Rolling Stones drummer dies aged 80 | Ents & Arts News | Sky  News

My song selection for this short post was inspired by this piece in USA Today written by national correspondent Marco della Cava who apparently knows how to play the drums. Get Off Of My Cloud, one of five Stones songs he highlighted, is my favorite from a drumming perspective. I find Watts’ fill-ins pretty creative and not very common – almost something Ringo Starr could have played.

Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, Get Off Of My Cloud was first released as a single in the U.S. in September 1965, followed by the UK one month later. It topped the mainstream charts in both countries. The tune was also included on the Rolling Stones’ U.S. album December’s Children (And Everybody’s) that came out in December that year.

While I have no doubts The Rolling Stones will go on, Charlie Watts, who had been the band’s drummer for more than 58 years and not missed one concert since he joined in January 1963, will be dearly missed.

Sources: Wikipedia; Rolling Stones Twitter; USA Today; YouTube

Clips & Pix: ZZ Top/Tush

I’m still somewhat in disbelief about the sudden death of Dusty Hill at age 72, which was announced earlier today on ZZ Top’s website. According to the statement, Hill who had been the band’s bassist for more than 50 years died in his sleep. No cause of death was given.

Not surprisingly, word has spread quickly, and multiple media outlets like The Associated Press, USA Today, CNN and Rolling Stone, have already reported the sad news. I received a push notification on my phone to the aforementioned CCN story late this afternoon while being at work.

Referring to another statement on ZZ Top’s website from last week, CNN reported that Hill recently had been sidelined due a hip issue and that at Hill’s request, the band’s longtime guitar technician Elwood Francis had stepped in, as this apparently all happened while the band was touring.

Instead of writing yet another obituary, I’d like to pay tribute to Hill with the above live clip of one of ZZ Top’s best known tunes: Tush. Not only is it one of my all-time favorite songs by the Texan rockers, but it also happens to feature Hill as lead vocalist, a role typically taken by guitarist Billy Gibbons.

Tush, credited to Gibbons, Hill and drummer Frank Beard, is the final track of ZZ Top’s fourth studio album Fandango! from April 1975. It’s one of the tightest blues rockers I know and, as such, a perfect closer.

The final words of this post shall belong to ZZ Top. Here’s the statement from their website:

We are saddened by the news today that our Compadre, Dusty Hill, has passed away in his sleep at home in Houston, TX. We, along with legions of ZZ Top fans around the world, will miss your steadfast presence, your good nature, and enduring commitment to providing that monumental bottom to the ‘Top’. We will forever be connected to that “Blues Shuffle in C.”

You will be missed greatly, amigo.

Frank & Billy

Sources: Wikipedia; ZZ Top website; CNN; YouTube

Clips & Pix: Toto/Pamela

I realize this is the second Clips & Pix post in a row about a tune I already covered previously, but when I spotted this live rendition of Pamela by Toto on YouTube, I simply couldn’t resist publishing it. This was recorded during a one night special event on November 21, 2020, featuring Toto’s new line-up. And, boy, do they sound awesome!

After the end of Toto’s 2018-2019 40 Trips Around the Sun Tour to celebrate their 40th anniversary, it looked like they were done. Not so! The above event was the first time the band performed with their new formation. In addition to long-time members Steve Lukather (guitar, vocals), Joseph Williams (vocals) and David Paich (keyboards, vocals), Toto’s 15th incarnation includes Steve Maggiora (keyboards, backing vocals), Dominique “Xavier” Taplin (keyboards), Warren Ham (saxophone, percussion, backing vocals), John Pierce (bass) and Robert “Sput” Searight (drums).

Fifteen line-ups sounds like awfully many. And as bands go through multiple changes, things don’t necessarily get better. It can take time to become a true unit. In this case, all of the above musicians not only sound top notch but also do a nice job playing together. In my opinion, the standout is Searight. While I’m not a drummer, to me, he has great rhythmic feeling and is simply a joy to watch. Pay particular attention to him!

Pamela, co-written by Paich and Williams, first appeared on The Seventh One, Toto’s seventh studio album released in March 1988 – one of their best, in my view. Sadly, it was the last studio album with Jeff Porcaro, the band’s fantastic original drummer. It certainly can’t be easy to fill his shoes, but Searight looks like he’s the guy to do it!

Toto has already announced a major new tour. I guess there are still many fans out there, and it’s probably also lucrative for them to go on the road. The Dogz of Oz World Tour is scheduled to kick off in Germany in July 2022. If they come to my neck of the woods, I will seriously consider seeing them again.

Sources: Wikipedia; YouTube

Clips & Pix: Carole King/It’s Too Late

On Sunday, I went to a small outdoor concert, my first live music event in more than one and a half years, featuring a Carole King tribute act. On my way back home, I listened to Tapestry: Live in Hyde Park, a live and video album from September 2017, capturing King’s performance at London’s Hyde Park on July 3, 2016. The above clip of It’s Too Late is from that gig.

Admittedly, this isn’t the first time I’ve posted about It’s Too Late and the Tapestry album, on which that tune first appeared. If you’re a more frequent visitor of the blog, you know how much I dig Carole King. If I could pick only one singer-songwriter, it would probably be her.

So why do yet another post? To start, I think it’s a great tune that certainly can be highlighted more than once. More importantly, I feel this is a particularly nice rendition of one of my favorite Carole King songs.

Obviously, Carole’s voice has changed, but I think it’s aged beautifully. I love the overall soulfulness of this version, to which the great backing vocalists undoubtedly contribute. I also like Carole’s piano work and the guitar solos by who I believe is Danny Kortchmar, one of the original studio musicians from the Tapestry recording sessions.

Last but not least, the clip acknowledges how much I love live music and how much I’ve missed it during this dreadful pandemic. Sunday was a small start to what hopefully will be more concerts over the summer months and beyond.

Sources: Wikipedia; YouTube

Clips & Pix: Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band/Backstreets

Here’s a classic by Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band: Backstreets from Hammersmith Odeon, London ’75, a live album and video capturing a full-length performance by The Boss and his band at the British live entertainment venue in November 1975 during the Born to Run tour. This package was released in November 2005 as part of the 30th anniversary edition of Born to Run, my favorite Springsteen album.

While I feel there’s no need to justify this post, the reason I’m publishing this now is very simple. I was listening to a used vinyl copy of Born to Run I recently had picked up at a great local vintage record store. Backstreets, which like all other tracks on the record was written by Springsteen, is the final tune on Side one.

According to Songfacts, Backstreets is an intense story about a broken relationship; a tale of losing a lover where the narrator seems more concerned about losing her as a friend. The girl in the song, Terry, is a character Springsteen created based on girls he knew...Asked where this song came from in a 2016 interview with Rolling Stone, Springsteen replied: “Just youth, the beach, the night, friendships, the feeling of being an outcast and kind of living far away from things in this little outpost in New Jersey. It’s also about a place of personal refuge. It wasn’t a specific relationship or anything that brought the song into being.”

Songfacts also notes Backstreets is one of E Street Band drummer Max Weinberg’s favorite Springsteen tunes. They include the following quote from an ABC Radio interview: “I guess what hit me most about it was the emotionalism of the lyrics. I felt particularly proud to play on that record [Born to Run – CMM], because it was a kind of an involved drum part, it involved not playing a lot, just getting into that tom-tom figure – ba-ba-ba-ba-boom bom-boom, ba-ba-ba-ba-boom bom-boom. And if anyone’s every heard ‘Running Sacred’ by Roy Orbison, that was the kind of tension we were trying to create. And I like to think we did.”

In addition to Springsteen (electric guitar, vocals) and Weinberg, the tune’s original studio recording also featured Garry Tallent (bass) and Roy Bittan (piano, Hammond organ). Last but not least, there’s a magazine for Springsteen fans titled after the song. It’s been published quarterly since 1980.

Sources: Wikipedia; Songfacts; Backstreets website; YouTube