Clips & Pix: Toto/Pamela

I realize this is the second Clips & Pix post in a row about a tune I already covered previously, but when I spotted this live rendition of Pamela by Toto on YouTube, I simply couldn’t resist publishing it. This was recorded during a one night special event on November 21, 2020, featuring Toto’s new line-up. And, boy, do they sound awesome!

After the end of Toto’s 2018-2019 40 Trips Around the Sun Tour to celebrate their 40th anniversary, it looked like they were done. Not so! The above event was the first time the band performed with their new formation. In addition to long-time members Steve Lukather (guitar, vocals), Joseph Williams (vocals) and David Paich (keyboards, vocals), Toto’s 15th incarnation includes Steve Maggiora (keyboards, backing vocals), Dominique “Xavier” Taplin (keyboards), Warren Ham (saxophone, percussion, backing vocals), John Pierce (bass) and Robert “Sput” Searight (drums).

Fifteen line-ups sounds like awfully many. And as bands go through multiple changes, things don’t necessarily get better. It can take time to become a true unit. In this case, all of the above musicians not only sound top notch but also do a nice job playing together. In my opinion, the standout is Searight. While I’m not a drummer, to me, he has great rhythmic feeling and is simply a joy to watch. Pay particular attention to him!

Pamela, co-written by Paich and Williams, first appeared on The Seventh One, Toto’s seventh studio album released in March 1988 – one of their best, in my view. Sadly, it was the last studio album with Jeff Porcaro, the band’s fantastic original drummer. It certainly can’t be easy to fill his shoes, but Searight looks like he’s the guy to do it!

Toto has already announced a major new tour. I guess there are still many fans out there, and it’s probably also lucrative for them to go on the road. The Dogz of Oz World Tour is scheduled to kick off in Germany in July 2022. If they come to my neck of the woods, I will seriously consider seeing them again.

Sources: Wikipedia; YouTube

Clips & Pix: Carole King/It’s Too Late

On Sunday, I went to a small outdoor concert, my first live music event in more than one and a half years, featuring a Carole King tribute act. On my way back home, I listened to Tapestry: Live in Hyde Park, a live and video album from September 2017, capturing King’s performance at London’s Hyde Park on July 3, 2016. The above clip of It’s Too Late is from that gig.

Admittedly, this isn’t the first time I’ve posted about It’s Too Late and the Tapestry album, on which that tune first appeared. If you’re a more frequent visitor of the blog, you know how much I dig Carole King. If I could pick only one singer-songwriter, it would probably be her.

So why do yet another post? To start, I think it’s a great tune that certainly can be highlighted more than once. More importantly, I feel this is a particularly nice rendition of one of my favorite Carole King songs.

Obviously, Carole’s voice has changed, but I think it’s aged beautifully. I love the overall soulfulness of this version, to which the great backing vocalists undoubtedly contribute. I also like Carole’s piano work and the guitar solos by who I believe is Danny Kortchmar, one of the original studio musicians from the Tapestry recording sessions.

Last but not least, the clip acknowledges how much I love live music and how much I’ve missed it during this dreadful pandemic. Sunday was a small start to what hopefully will be more concerts over the summer months and beyond.

Sources: Wikipedia; YouTube

Clips & Pix: Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band/Backstreets

Here’s a classic by Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band: Backstreets from Hammersmith Odeon, London ’75, a live album and video capturing a full-length performance by The Boss and his band at the British live entertainment venue in November 1975 during the Born to Run tour. This package was released in November 2005 as part of the 30th anniversary edition of Born to Run, my favorite Springsteen album.

While I feel there’s no need to justify this post, the reason I’m publishing this now is very simple. I was listening to a used vinyl copy of Born to Run I recently had picked up at a great local vintage record store. Backstreets, which like all other tracks on the record was written by Springsteen, is the final tune on Side one.

According to Songfacts, Backstreets is an intense story about a broken relationship; a tale of losing a lover where the narrator seems more concerned about losing her as a friend. The girl in the song, Terry, is a character Springsteen created based on girls he knew...Asked where this song came from in a 2016 interview with Rolling Stone, Springsteen replied: “Just youth, the beach, the night, friendships, the feeling of being an outcast and kind of living far away from things in this little outpost in New Jersey. It’s also about a place of personal refuge. It wasn’t a specific relationship or anything that brought the song into being.”

Songfacts also notes Backstreets is one of E Street Band drummer Max Weinberg’s favorite Springsteen tunes. They include the following quote from an ABC Radio interview: “I guess what hit me most about it was the emotionalism of the lyrics. I felt particularly proud to play on that record [Born to Run – CMM], because it was a kind of an involved drum part, it involved not playing a lot, just getting into that tom-tom figure – ba-ba-ba-ba-boom bom-boom, ba-ba-ba-ba-boom bom-boom. And if anyone’s every heard ‘Running Sacred’ by Roy Orbison, that was the kind of tension we were trying to create. And I like to think we did.”

In addition to Springsteen (electric guitar, vocals) and Weinberg, the tune’s original studio recording also featured Garry Tallent (bass) and Roy Bittan (piano, Hammond organ). Last but not least, there’s a magazine for Springsteen fans titled after the song. It’s been published quarterly since 1980.

Sources: Wikipedia; Songfacts; Backstreets website; YouTube

Clips & Pix: Neil Young & Graham Nash/Birds (Demo)

This nice demo of Neil Young and Graham Nash performing Young’s Birds appears on the massive Déjà Vu 50th Anniversary Reissue that appeared last Friday, May 14. In addition to remastered edits of the original tunes, the reissue features 38 previously unreleased tacks, including session recordings, outtakes and demos.

Déjà Vu, the sophomore studio album by Crosby, Stills & Nash, and their first as a quartet with Neil Young, originally was released on March 11, 1970. Due to the pandemic and some bad blood between the former band mates, the reissue was delayed by more than a year. Plus, as Rolling Stone sarcastically reported, these guys always broke the rules, starting with the use of their names as a band.

While I’ve only heard bits and pieces so far, the reissue looks like something fans of Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young are going to enjoy. More casual listeners of CSNY will probably get less out of it. The box set is available in five-vinyl-LP and four-CD/ one vinyl-LP formats. Both boxes come with a 12×12 hardback book.

While David Crosby, Stephen Stills, Graham Nash and Neil Young at least each gave their blessing to the reissue, it mostly appears to have been Nash and Stills who were committed to it. Among the additional tracks, Young is only represented with two: The above Birds and an alternate take of Helpless.

According to Ultimate Classic Rock, Crosby told Rolling Stone, “I am very proud of the record, [but] this is like a repackaging. It’s probably a good thing, but it’s not that big a deal to me. The guy who looks backwards and does this kind of stuff is Nash. He always has been. I don’t really give much of a shit about that.” If anybody was harboring any hope of a Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young reunion, insensitive commentary like this certainly doesn’t help!

Let’s end it on a more positive note. Here’s what Nash had to say to Rolling Stone about the demo of Birds with Young. “I know it’s just me and Neil doing it with his acoustic guitar, but that’s a beautiful piece of music. It’s me trying to be the best harmony singer I can be with somebody of the stature of Neil Young. I don’t want to stick out singing extra words that he’s not singing. I have to be on my game. And ‘Birds’ is a perfect example of that.” Young included a piano version of Birds on his third solo album After the Gold Rush from September 1970.

Sources: Wikipedia; Rolling Stone; Ultimate Classic Rock; YouTube

Clips & Pix: Mick Jagger & Dave Grohl/Eazy Sleazy

On Tuesday, Mick Jagger and Dave Grohl dropped this surprise collaboration rocker about life during Covid-19 and coming out of the pandemic. Jagger handled vocals and rhythm guitar, while Grohl played lead guitar, bass and drums – all socially distanced, of course. The tune was produced by Matt Clifford, a longtime collaborator who had the same role for Jagger’s previous double A-sided single Gotta Get a Grip/England Lost from July 2017.

“Wanted to share this song that I wrote about eventually coming out of lockdown, with some much needed optimism,” Jagger wrote in a short statement on his website. “- thank you to Dave Grohl from Foofighters for jumping on drums, bass and guitar, it was a lot of fun working with you on this – hope you all enjoy Eazy Sleazy !”

The song’s lyrics mix frustration (We took it on the chin/The numbers were so grim…), poking fun at crazy conspiracy theories (Shooting the vaccine/Bill Gates is in my bloodstream/It’s mind control…) and some sarcasm (That’s a pretty mask/ But never take a chance TikTok stupid dance…) with a dose of optimism (Now we’re out of these prison walls/You gotta pay Peter if you’re robbing Paul/But it’s easy easy/Everything’s gonna be really freaky…).

“It’s hard to put into words what recording this song with Sir Mick means to me,” Grohl told Rolling Stone. “It’s beyond a dream come true. Just when I thought life couldn’t get any crazier……and it’s the song of the summer, without a doubt!!” While that’s perhaps a bit of a bold statement, it’s a fun tune!

Rolling Stone also recalled this isn’t the first Jagger-Grohl collaboration. In 2012, Foo Fighters were one of Jagger’s backing bands when he hosted and performed on Saturday Night Live. And in 2013, Grohl joined The Rolling Stones during a gig in Anaheim, Calif. to play guitar and sing on Bitch.

Here are the full lyrics:

We took it on the chin
The numbers were so grim
Bossed around by pricks
Stiffen upper lips
Pacing in the yard
You’re trying to take the mick
You must think I’m really thick

Looking at the graphs with a magnifying glass
Cancel all the tours, football’s fake applause
No more travel brochures
Virtual premieres, I’ve got nothing left to wear

Looking out from these prison walls
You got to rob Peter if you’re paying Paul
But it’s easy easy
Everything’s gonna get really freaky
Alright on the night
Soon it’ll be be a memory you’re trying to remember to forget

That’s a pretty mask
But never take a chance TikTok stupid dance
Took a samba class yeah I landed on my ass
Trying to write a tune you better hook me up to Zoom
See my poncey books teach myself to cook
Way too much TV, its lobotomizing me, yeah
Think I’ve put on weight
I’ll have another drink then I’ll clean the kitchen sink

We escaped from the prison walls
Open the windows and open the doors
But it’s easy easy
Everything’s gonna get really freaky
Alright on the night
It’s gonna be a garden of earthly delights
Yeah it’s easy sleazy
Everything’s smooth and greasy
Yeah easy, believe me
It’ll only be a memory you’re trying to remember to forget

Shooting the vaccine
Bill Gates is in my bloodstream
It’s mind control
The earth is flat and cold
It’s never warming up
The Arctic’s turned to slush
The second coming’s late
And there’s aliens in the deep state

Now we’re out of these prison walls
You gotta pay Peter if you’re robbing Paul
But it’s easy easy
Everything’s gonna be really freaky
Alright on the night
We’re all headed back to paradise
Yeah easy. believe me
It’ll be a memory you’re trying to remember to forget

Easy cheesy
Everybody sing please please me
Yeah
It’ll be a memory you’re trying to remember to forget

Sources: Wikipedia; Rolling Stone; Mick Jagger website; YouTube

John Hiatt with The Jerry Douglas Band/Mississippi Phone Booth

I just love this clip of heartland rocker John Hiatt teaming up with Dobro resonator guitar master Jerry Douglas. Mississippi Phone Booth, written by Hiatt, is from Leftover Feelings, an upcoming collaboration album by the two artists scheduled for May 21.

As reported by Paste, while Hiatt and Douglas have known each other for years, the album marks the first time they have recorded music together. Initially, Leftover Feelings was supposed to come out in April of last year. But like in so many other cases, COVID-19 threw a monkey wrench into everything.

On the upside, Hiatt and Douglas ended up having four days at Nashville’s historic RCA Studio B during the shutdown, which otherwise would have been used by the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum for public tours. One can only imagine what it must have felt like to work in the same space where the likes of Elvis Presley, The Everly Brothers and Waylon Jennings once recorded.

John Hiatt and Jerry Douglas

“The whole time you’re there, when you’re not playing, you’re thinking about who has been in that room and played, Douglas told Paste. “All these great music producers and musicians walked in and out through that room, and it was their playhouse.”

“The room’s just got a feel to it,” added Hiatt. “My mind started pedaling back to when I was a little boy hearing ‘Blue Christmas’ every Christmas and ‘Love Me Tender,’ and all of the great songs recorded there just kinda blew my mind.”

As for Mississippi Phone Booth, Hiatt commented, “I maintain that I write fiction, but my stories are based on life experiences, or the experiences of people I know, or things I’ve read about and so on. And this one in particular chronicles my last sort of run with trying to make alcohol and drugs work successfully in my life, I’ll just put it that way!”

“I have a mental picture of exactly where he was standing in that phone booth, calling and just begging somebody, at least for the operator to stay on the line long enough for him to talk to somebody,” added Douglas. “It sounded like a miserable situation. But I try to bring…real life to what was there, to do what I could do to swamp it out a little bit.”

Last but not least, here’s how John Hiatt’s website describes the upcoming album: Leftover Feelings is neither a bluegrass album nor a return to Hiatt’s 1980s days with slide guitar greats Ry Cooder and Sonny Landreth, though Douglas’s opening riff on “Long, Black Electric Cadillac” nods to Landreth’s charged intro to “Tennessee Plates,” Hiatt’s epic tale of heisting Elvis Presley’s Cadillac, a car that was surely purchased with proceeds from some of the 250-plus songs the King recorded at Studio B.

There’s no drummer, yet these grooves are deep and true. And while the up-tempo songs are, as ever, filled with delightful internal rhyme and sly aggression, The Jerry Douglas Band’s empathetic musicianship nudges Hiatt to performances that are startlingly vulnerable. Built when Hiatt was five years old, Studio B was designed for music to be made in real time by musicians listening to each other and reacting in the emotional moment. That’s what happened here: Five players on the studio floor, making decisions on instinct rather than calculation.

Mississippi Phone Booth follows All the Lilacs in Ohio, another Hiatt song from Leftover Feelings, which was released upfront in early March. I certainly look forward to hearing the entire album.

Sources: Paste; John Hiatt website; YouTube

Clips & Pix: Neil Young/Tell Me Why

Neil Young has been on a roll releasing material from his archives. The above clip is from an upcoming album and concert film titled Young Shakespeare. Scheduled for March 26, it captures an acoustic gig at the Shakespeare Theater in Stratford, Conn. on January 22, 1971. As reported by Ultimate Classic Rock, this is the earliest known footage of Young in concert.

Recorded three days after the famous show at Toronto’s Massey Hall (released as Live at Massey Hall 1971 in March 2007), the footage was taken for German TV. Apparently, it never aired and wasn’t released otherwise until now.

Neil Young Announces 'Young Shakespeare' Live LP and Concert Film

Tell Me Why, written by Young, is the opener of the album and film. It also is the first track of his third studio album After the Gold Rush, which came out in September 1970, only four months prior to the Shakespeare and Massey Hall shows.

While I like many of Neil Young’s electric tunes with Crazy Horse, I think oftentimes he’s even better solo with just his acoustic guitar and harmonica or piano. Notably, Young Shakespeare features various tunes from Harvest, the follow-on to After the Gold Rush, which had not been released at the time. These songs include classics A Man Needs a Maid, Heart of Gold and The Needle and the Damage Done. Following is the official film trailer.

Here’s the track list:

1. Tell Me Why
2. Old Man
3. The Needle and the Damage Done
4. Ohio
5. Dance Dance Dance
6. Cowgirl in the Sand
7. A Man Needs a Maid/Heart of Gold
8. Journey Through the Past
9. Don’t Let It Bring You Down
10. Helpless
11. Down by the River
12. Sugar Mountain


Young Shakespeare will be available on vinyl, CD, DVD and streaming platforms. It comes on the heels of Way Down in the Rust Bucket, another excellent live album Young released on February 26, which I previously covered here.

Sources: Wikipedia; Ultimate Classic Rock; YouTube

Clips & Pix: S.T.S./Da Kummt Die Sunn

For this one, I have to give a shoutout to my fellow German blogger sori1982, who currently resides in Austria and recently brought to my attention this amazing cover of Here Comes the Sun, performed in German Austrian style.

I’m sure many of Sori’s visitors have heard this already, but at least in my case, I can say the clip she called out at the time didn’t work on my end – likely due to silly YouTube legal restrictions. So for the benefit of North American and perhaps other ex-European audiences, I hope this will do the trick!

S.T.S., which stands for Steinbäcker, Timischl & Schiffkowitz, were an Austrian trio from Graz, the second largest city in Austria. They were founded in 1975 by Gert Steinbäcker, Günter Timischl and Schiffkowitz (Helmut Röhrling). Between 1981 and 2007, S.T.S. released 11 albums. At first, half of their lyrics were written in English before they settled on the Austrian dialect spoken in the southeast region of Styria. In July 2014, the trio officially called it quits, citing health issues for Timischl.

Da kummt die Sunn appeared as a single in 1981. Apart from beautiful harmony singing, I love how S.T.S. ingeniously translated George Harrison’s original lyrics to the Styrian dialect. This gives it a unique charm. Tell me this doesn’t sound amazing!

Sources: Wikipedia; YouTube

Clips & Pix: Neil Young & Crazy Horse/Mansion on the Hill

Here’s a great goodie for all Neil Young fans, but before getting to it, I must give credit where credit is due: Earlier this week, Music Enthusiast pointed me to this Rolling Stone interview with Frank “Poncho” Sampedro, ex-guitarist of Neil’s longtime backing band Crazy Horse, who sadly was forced to retire several years ago due to severe arthritis in his hands and feet – yikes!

The interview was conducted in the wake of Neil’s latest release from his archives: Way Down in the Rust Bucket from last Friday, February 26, which I had completely missed! It captures the band live on November 13, 1990 at The Catalyst in Santa Cruz, Calif. The nightclub holds about 800 people and is located close to Neil’s Broken Arrow ranch.

Mansion on the Hill, written by Neil Young, is from the Ragged Glory album he released with Crazy Horse in September of the same year. The above gig was scheduled as a “warm-up” to the band’s tour in support of the album.

Here’s an excerpt from Neil’s Archives site: Poncho and the boys are all excited to bring you what we feel is the definitive chapter in our story!…We were in the pocket as soon as the lights went down that night at the Catalyst…Now this record and film brings that night to everybody!

Said Poncho to Rolling Stone: “Let me go on record as saying that I think this Way Down in the Rust Bucket is the best Crazy Horse record we ever recorded. I love it! I love this record. Neil plays great, unbelievably great. He’s just electrified…He’s just playing so good and the band played really good.”

Indeed. And based on what I’ve heard thus far, it sounds awesome!

Sources: Wikipedia; Rolling Stone; Neil Young Archives website; YouTube

Clips and Pix: The Faces/Maybe I’m Amazed

Holy cow, until I just came across a YouTube clip, I had not known The Faces covered Maybe I’m Amazed. I really dig their version. Musically, it’s similar to the original, but what stands out to me is Rod Stewart’s voice, which sounds perfect for this tune.

Maybe I’m Amazed was written by Paul McCartney and first appeared on his debut solo album McCartney from April 1970. I know I’ve said this before, the live version that appeared in December 1967 on Wings Over America is much better.

The Faces included their cover, which is also a live recording, on their second studio album Long Player that was released in February. The performance had been captured at Fillmore East in November 1970.

BTW, the guy who starts on lead vocals before Stewart takes over is Ronnie Lane, the band’s bassist. He later comes back to sing harmony. In addition to him and Stewart, The Faces included Ronnie Wood (guitar, vocals), Ian McLagan (keyboards) and Kenny Jones (drums). Man, what a fantastic band – I guess I have to listen to some more!

Sources: Wikipedia; YouTube