Clips & Pix: Huey Lewis and The News/Workin’ for a Livin’

This great bluesy pop rocker by Huey Lewis and the News has been on my mind lately, as I’ve found myself in a nerve-wracking uncertain job situation for the past seven months, which fortunately just turned to the better. To me this tune perfectly describes the reality of the American Dream and rings as true today as it did when it first came out in 1982. Unless you’re a senator’s son or another fortunate one, to borrow from John Fogerty, you’re taking what they’re givin’, coz, baby, you’re workin’ for a livin’.

Don’t get me wrong. I realize how many folks have lost their jobs due to the pandemic and the science deniers who have played it down from day one and continue to do so, even as new cases and now death rates are spiking in many U.S. states. So, yes, I’m grateful I can work from home and still have a job, even though it’s workin’ for a livin’. That being said, the income inequality in one of the richest nations on earth remains a disgrace!

Co-written by Huey Lewis and News guitarist Chris Hayes, Workin’ for a Livin’ appeared on the band’s second studio album Picture This from January 1982. The song was also released separately in July 1982 as the fourth and last single from the record. The above clip is the official video.

Sources: Wikipedia; YouTube

Clips & Pix: Emmylou Harris & the Hot Band/Ooh Las Vegas

I rarely post clips twice but felt the above warranted an exception. I previously included this amazing footage in a July 2017 post about the British TV music show The Old Grey Whistle¬†Test. It captures Emmylou Harris, who appeared on the program in 1977 with The Hot Band, her backing group from 1974 until 1991. That band couldn’t have selected a better name – I mean, holy smoke!

Ooh Las Vegas was co-written by Gram Parsons and Ric Grech. Harris included her rendition of the tune on her third studio album Elite Hotel released in December 1975. She also sang on Parsons’ original from his January 1974 studio record Grievous Angel. I think both versions are fantastic and represent county rock at its finest. Call it hillbilly music, if you want – I don’t care, this just rocks!

The Hot Band featured Albert Lee (lead guitar, vocals), Rodney Crowell (guitar, vocals), Emory Gordy Jr. (bass, vocals), Glen D. Hardin (piano), Hank DeVito (steel guitar) and John Ware (drums). Harris provided lead vocals and guitar.

I really need to further explore Emmylou Harris. The more of her music I hear, the more I like her. It’s already clear to me she absolutely deserves more than just one clip. Look for a post on her in the near future.

Sources: Wikipedia; YouTube

Clips & Pix: Elvis Presley/Suspicious Minds

Elvis Presley was my childhood idol. I was nuts about the man. I would try to imitate his hairdo and impersonate him in front of the mirror. Okay, to my defense, I was like 10 years old or so. ūüôā

Then came The Beatles. They clearly crowded out Elvis, though he never faded away altogether. While I’m no longer obsessed with Elvis, I continue to believe he was a great vocalist and an amazing performer, especially during his early years. His moves were just crazy.

While Suspicious Minds isn’t from his early career, it’s always been one of my favorite Elvis tunes. The song was co-written by Francis Zambon and Mark James. It was also James who recorded and released it first in 1968. But after his version failed commercially, the song was recorded by Elvis with producer Chips Moman who had also produced James’ take.

Appearing in August 1969, Suspicious Minds became one of the most notable hits for Elvis that helped revive his chart success in the wake of his NBC televised concert ’68 Comeback Special. The tune hit no. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100, marking Elvis’ 18th and final chart-topping single in the U.S., a success that had eluded him for seven years since his 1962 hit Good Luck Charm.

Sources: Wikipedia; YouTube

Clips & Pix: Niedeckens BAP/Halv Su Wild

These days, the U.S. is going through so much pain and despair. It truly feels like unprecedented times, at least to me. While it’s important to acknowledge the two epidemics of COVID-19 and systemic racism and hold those who call themselves leaders responsible, I also believe it’s critical never to lose hope. Never to give up.

One of the many beautiful things music can do is to help lift our spirits. Here’s a great picker upper from my favorite German rock band BAP or Niedeckens BAP, as they have been known since September 2014: Halv su wild (things aren’t as bad). The title track from their 16th studio album released in March 2011 has cheered me up more than once when I felt down.

Like all of the band’s lyrics, the words were written by founder Wolfgang Niedecken. The music of this particular tune was composed by him and his main songwriting partner at the time, former lead guitarist Helmut Krumminga.

The above clip is from a concert that was part of a tour to celebrate BAP’s 40th anniversary, which I was fortunate to attend during a visit to Germany in June 2016. The line-up featured Krumminga’s excellent successor Ulrich Rode.

Of course, I realize most readers don’t understand German – not to speak of K√∂lsch, the regional dialect in which Niedeckens performs the songs, and that is spoken in the area of Cologne. Following is a rough translation. Admittedly, it sounds much better in K√∂lsch, but I hope you get the point!

Hey what’s going on, don’t tell me you’ve given up.You’re right things are tough, but no matter what happens, the sun is rising, even though the night seems to be endless. Trust in what the new day brings before you’re consumed by self-doubt.

Things aren’t as bad, just wait and you will see. Definitely, things aren’t as bad, it’s gonna work out. Believe me, things aren’t as bad, no matter how much you despair. The world won’t come to an end. Things aren’t as bad.

Hey man, stop now, you will see land again. Don’t have doubts, you know what you can do. Don’t hide behind a wall, no, you have to get out. Sure, it’s a shitty situation, but, hey, shit happens!

Things aren’t as bad, just wait and you will see. Definitely, things aren’t as bad, it’s gonna work out. Believe me things aren’t as bad, no matter how much you despair. The world won’t come to an end. Things aren’t as bad.

The person who manages to take away our joy to live still needs to be born. It’s not a problem…no, it’s really not.

Sources: Wikipedia; YouTube

Clips & Pix: John Mayer/Waiting on the World to Change

I still remember initially I was in complete disbelief that this fantastic tune was written John Mayer. Don’t get me wrong: I’ve always thought of Mayer as a decent songwriter and a great guitarist. I just didn’t believe he had so much soul in him! You could easily imagine somebody like Marvin Gaye or Curtis Mayfield having performed this song.

Waiting on the World to Change, released in July 2006, became the lead single to Mayer’s third studio album Continuum that appeared in September of the same year. According to Songfacts, the reflective tune describes how most people deal with problems in the world. When Mayer sings, “Me and all my friends, we are all misunderstood, say we stand for nothing but there’s no way we ever could,” he’s talking about his generation and their lack of faith in the government – all we can do is wait, and it seems like everyone is waiting for the world to become a better place.

Songfacts further notes, In an interview with the¬†Daily Mail¬†December 21, 2007 Mayer explained why he wrote this song that makes a point without laboring matters: “I wanted to start a debate. Most of us are happy to wait for things to change.”

Waiting on the World to Change became one of Mayer’s most successful singles. In the U.S., it peaked at no. 14 on the Billboard Hot 100 and topped the Adult Contemporary chart. It also charted in Canada, New Zealand and a few European countries. Additionally, the tune won the Grammy for Best Male Pop Vocal Performance in February 2007.

Sources: Wikipedia; Songfacts; YouTube

Clips & Pix: Southern Avenue/80 Miles From Memphis

Prompted by a clip of Southern Avenue on Facebook, I spontaneously decided to do another post on 80 Miles From Memphis. I’ve dug this band and this song since I listened to their eponymous debut album about three years ago, which was released on the re-activated Stax Records label.

Southern Avenue from Memphis, Tenn. blend elements of traditional blues and Stax-style soul with contemporary R&B. The band’s first album and this tune have a more traditional sound, while their sophomore release Keep On from May 2019 is more funk and R&B-oriented. I can highly recommend both records!

80 Miles From Memphis was written by the band’s guitarist Ori Naftaly, who originally is a blues guitarist from Israel. In 2015, he decided to relocate to Memphis where he formed Southern Avenue with vocalist¬†Tierini Jackson¬†and her sister¬†Tikyra Jackson (drums, backing vocals). You can read more about the band’s remarkable background story and a great concert I saw in New York in August 2018 here.

I saw the band a second time in Asbury Park, N.J. in July 2019 and posted about it here. Both gigs proved the band is a strong live act. I’m definitely planning to see them again when the opportunity arises and the time is right.

Sources: Wikipedia; YouTube

Clips & Pix: Larkin Poe/Back Down South

Back Down South is the fourth and latest single from Larkin Poe’s upcoming new album Self Made Man slated to come out on June 12. They announced the release on Friday via their Twitter handle.

If you’ve visited my blog before, chances are you’ve seen previous posts I did on sisters Rebecca Lovell¬†(guitar) and¬†Megan Lovell¬†(lap steel guitar).¬†For this tune, they teamed up with Tyler Bryant, a 29-year-old blues rock guitarist from Texas, who based on Wikipedia seems to be some kind of wunderkind I should probably check out.

The tune is a nice illustration of Larkin Poe’s approach to blend traditional blues and rock with contemporary sounds like synth claps. Admittedly, I prefer real hand clapping or drums for that matter but also respect what I assume is an attempt to create a more updated sound.

Self Made Man definitely is on my radar screen.

Sources: Larkin Poe Twitter feed; YouTube

Clips & Pix: John Fogerty/Born On the Bayou

Today, John Fogerty turned 75 years old – holy cow! I feel like most of my music heroes are well into their ’70s. To celebrate the occasion, here’s one of my favorite tunes Fogerty has written: Born On the Bayou. It first appeared on Creedence Clearwater Revival’s sophomore album Bayou Country released in January 1969.

As Songfacts explains, Fogerty who grew up in Northern California had never actually been to a bayou when he wrote the song – he researched it in encyclopedias and imagined a bayou childhood for the song’s narrative. Songfacts also notes: Fogerty says the song was inspired by gospel music and popular movies. He explained in¬†Bad Moon Rising: The Unofficial History of Creedence Clearwater Revivial, “‘Born on the Bayou’ was… about a mythical childhood and a heat-filled time, the Fourth of July. I put it in the swamp where, of course, I had never lived. I was trying to be a pure writer, no guitar in hand, visualizing and looking at the bare walls of my apartment.” Whatever inspired Fogerty, it’s a great song!

Apparently, the above footage was taken on June 8, 2018 at Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Catoosa, Okla., which is in the Tulsa vicinity. At that time, Fogerty had already embarked on the Blues and Bayous Tour with ZZ Top. I was fortunate to catch one of the shows and reviewed it here. Per Setlist.fm, the Catoosa date wasn’t part of the joint tour. While ZZ Top were performing in Oklahoma as well that night, they were about 220 miles to the south in Thackerville.

Sources: Wikipedia; Songfacts; Setlist.fm; YouTube

Clips & Pix: Stevie Nicks/Landslide

Stevie Nicks, one of the distinct voices in pop rock and a great songwriter, turned 72 years old today. To celebrate the happy occasion, here’s one of my favorite tunes written by her: Landslide. According to Songfacts, Nicks wrote that song about a father-daughter relationship on the guitar in about five minutes in Aspen, Colo.

“My dad did have something to do with it, but he absolutely thinks that he was the whole complete reason it was ever written,” Nicks stated. “I guess it was about September 1974, I was home at my dad and Mom’s house in Phoenix, and my father said, ‘You know, you really put a lot of time into this [her singing career], maybe you should give this six more months, and if you want to go back to school, we’ll pay for it. Basically you can do whatever you want and we’ll pay for it – I have wonderful parents, and I went, ‘cool, I can do that.'”

She went on, “Lindsey and I went up to Aspen, and we went to somebody’s incredible house, and they had a piano, and I had my guitar with me, and I went into their living room, looking out over the incredible Aspen skyway, and I wrote ‘Landslide.’ Three months later, Mick Fleetwood called. On New Year’s Eve, 1974, called and asked us to join Fleetwood Mac. So it was three months, I still had three more months to go to beat my six month goal that my dad gave me.”

Landslide was first recorded for Fleetwood Mac’s self-titled 10th studio album released in July 1975. Nicks also included a live version performed with the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra on her compilations Crystal Visions – The Very Best of Stevie Nicks and Stand Back from March 2007 and March 2019, respectively.

The above live version appears to have been captured in Chicago in 2008. I believe the musician backing Nicks is well known session guitarist Waddy Wachtel.

Sources: Wikipedia; Songfacts; YouTube

Clips & Pix: Larkin Poe/Keep Diggin’

Keep Diggin’ is the third tune from Larkin Poe’s upcoming fifth studio album Self Made Man scheduled to come out on June 12th. Yesterday, they announced the premiere of the song’s official video on their YouTube channel.

This isn’t the first time I’ve written and raved about sister act Rebecca Lovell (guitar) and Megan Lovell (lap steel guitar). For example, you can read about their previous album Venom & Faith here.

I just find the energy and enthusiasm these two young ladies bring to their music infectious. Their harmony vocals sound amazing as well. Based on the clips on their YouTube channel, Larkin Poe must be great live, and I hope to get a chance to see them at some point. Meanwhile, I’m looking forward to the new album.

Sources: Wikipedia; Lakin Poe Facebook page; Larkin Poe Twitter handle; YouTube