Clips & Pix: Southern Avenue/Savior

Savior is the second single from the upcoming sophomore album Keep On by Memphis blues, soul and R&B band Southern Avenue. The record is set to come out on May 10 via Concord Records.

Co-written by guitarist Ori Naftaly and lead vocalist Tierinii Jackson, this is quite a seductive tune by one of the few contemporary bands I really dig. It comes two weeks after the release of the lead single Whiskey Love, which I covered here.

“There was a magic that happened between the guitar and her voice,” Naftaly told culture magazine PopMatters. It wasn’t written on a computer. It was me and her in a room. It was originally intended to be a keyboard song with the Rhodes. It took me a minute to let go of my vision for it as a keyboard song. I’m a guitar player but my agenda as a bandleader and producer is to bring everybody in. But the song really seemed to need a guitar. It has that epic feeling that we wanted it to have.”

Based on the first two singles, Keep On sounds like a very promising album. I will certainly keep it on my radar screen.

Sources: Southern Avenue Facebook group; PopMatters, YouTube

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Clips & Pix: The Rolling Stones Featuring Brad Paisley/Dead Flowers

An edited take of the above recording of Dead Flowers appears on the bonus version of Honk, the new greatest hits collection released today by The Rolling Stones. It was captured in Philly in June 2013 and features country artist Brad Paisley, who shares vocals with Mick Jagger and puts on a nice guitar solo. Co-written by Jagger and Keith Richards, the tune first appeared on Sticky Fingers, my favorite Stones album from April 1971.

Based on Wikipedia, Honk is the Stones’ 26th compilation album. According to their website, it features “the biggest hits and classic cuts from every Rolling Stones studio album from 1971’s Sticky Fingers to 2016’s Blue & Lonesome” and “is the most up to date collection of essential Stones’ tracks, including 36 fan favourites and rarities, with the bonus version including 10 additional live songs, presenting collaborations with some of the biggest names in music, such as Dave Grohl, Florence Welch, Brad Paisley and more.”

Initially timed to their now postponed U.S. tour due to Mick Jagger’s heart valve surgery, folks could be forgiven to be a bit cynical about Honk. But as a long-time and probably somewhat biased listener of the Rolling Stones, the new collection doesn’t bother me. While I’m generally more fond of the Stones’ 60s and early ’70s period, apart from Dead Flowers, Honk features great other tunes like Brown Sugar, Start Me Up and It’s Only Rock ‘n’ Roll But I Like It – yes I do! The other live tracks are fun to listen to as well.

Sources: Wikipedia, Rolling Stones website, YouTube

Clips & Pix: Joe Jackson/Geraldine And John

Lately, I’ve been listening quite a bit to I’m The Man by Joe Jackson. His sophomore album from October 1979 is my favorite among his records I know. The timing is not entirely a coincidence.

One of the reasons I dig the album is because of the bass parts by Graham Maby, with whom Jackson works to this day. A few months ago, I decided to get inexpensive bass equipment for home use to see whether I could revive the moderate skills I once had close to 30 years ago.

Since I’ve always liked Maybe’s bass playing, I’ve been working to figure out some of his bass parts. I’m not gonna lie – some of this stuff ain’t easy, especially when you’re rusty, but fortunately there’s YouTube. Plus, I’m doing this to relax and have some fun, not because of any bigger ambitions. I simply don’t have the time to take things to any higher level, not to mention that my skills would certainly need to improve!

Anyway, this is where Geraldine And John came into the picture. Except for a cover of Chuck Berry’s Come On, all tracks on the album were written by Jackson. Not only do I love the laid back groove of the tune, but I also dig Maybe’s bass line. It’s not super complicated, which is why I guess I’ve been able to figure it out 95 percent. But it’s just great, both rhythmically and melodically, effectively helping propel the song forward – exactly what a bassist is supposed to do!

I also like to acknowledge the two other musicians in Jackson’s band at the time: Gary Sanford (guitar) and David Houghton (drums, backing vocals), who both do an excellent job as well. On December 15, 1980, the band played their last gig in the Netherlands in the wake of Jackson’s third studio album Beat Crazy. Jackson decided to reunite them for his 2003 album Volume 4. They also toured together leading up to the record’s release and thereafter.

Sources: Wikipedia, Rolling Stone, YouTube

Clips & Pix: Southern Avenue/No Time To Lose

I’ve written about Southern Avenue before, for example here. Together with Greta Van Fleet, this five-piece funky blues, R&B and soul band from Memphis, Tenn. is one of the very few younger contemporary music acts I’m truly excited about. I had a chance to briefly chat with guitarist Ori Naftaly and lead vocalist Tierinii Jackson at a gig in New York last August, and apart from being talented artists, they are such nice and regular people – not necessarily a given in the music world, especially for a band that appears to be received enthusiastically wherever they perform. These guys are keeping it real!

Co-written by Jackson and Naftaly, No Time To Lose is included on Southern Southern’s eponymous debut album that appeared in February 2017 on Stax Records – yep, that Stax where the likes of Otis Redding, Wilson Pickett and Sam & Dave released their music. That in and of itself is pretty cool in my book. I also think this tune rocks: great guitar riff and superb singing. The sound of the keys played by Jeremy Powell is right up my alley as well. Tierinii’s sister Tikyra Jackson on drums completes the band’s core lineup. Bassist Gage Markey is a touring member.

Speaking of touring, Southern Avenue seems to be on the road most of the time. They’re playing in many parts of the U.S. and occasionally even oversees. You can check out their current schedule on their Facebook page here. They are also scheduled to release their sophomore album later this year.

Sources: Southern Avenue website and Facebook page, YouTube

Clips & Pix: The Commitments/Mustang Sally

Friday night, I watched The Commitments in a charming little theater close to Princeton, N.J.,  where they featured the Irish musical comedy in celebration of St. Patrick’s Day. It must have been the third or fourth time I saw the picture about a lad putting together a soul band of working class youngsters on the northside of Dublin. Apart from being pretty hilarious, the movie features great Stax-like soul music. One of my favorites is Mustang Sally.

While the tune is most closely associated with Wilson Pickett, who released it in 1966 and scored a hit, it was actually first recorded the previous year by Stax fellow artist Bonny “Mack” Rice, who also penned the song. Apart from Mustang Sally, Rice is best known for co-writing Respect Yourself with Luther Ingram. I like both the original and Pickett’s cover of Mustang Sally but have to say the added pep in the version by The Commitments kicks it up a notch for me.

Andrew Strong, who plays the band’s obnoxious lead vocalist Deco Cuffe, just has a fantastic raspy soulful voice. According to Wikipedia, all other band members acting in the movie were actually performing as well and selected because of their musical talents. The only exception was saxophonist Joey ‘The Lips’ Fagan (gotta love that name) played by Johnny Murphy.

At the end of the day, whoever was playing what you hear in the picture or on the soundtrack did a phenomenal job. Apparently, there is a still-active touring version of the band called Stars From The Commitments featuring various members from the movie’s cast.

Sources: Wikipedia, YouTube

Happy St. Paddy’s Day Weekend!

With S. Paddy’s Day weekend being underway, it felt right to post this clip of Fisherman’s Blues by British-Irish folk rockers The Waterboys. Apparently, the footage was captured during a 2007 gig in Germany as part of the long-running TV music show Rockpalast.

Co-written by founding member Mike Scott (vocals, guitar, piano) and Steve Wickham (fiddle, mandolin), who joined The Waterboys in 1985, Fisherman’s Blues is the title track of the band’s fourth studio album released in October 1988. Scott and Wickham continue to be part of the present line-up, which has seen many changes since the band was formed in 1983.

Sources: Wikipedia, YouTube

Clips & Pix: Booker T. Jones Demonstrates Hammond B3

When one of the coolest Hammond B3 players on the planet demonstrates the legendary organ and chats about how he got into playing this beautiful instrument, you know you’re in for a treat! To me the above NPR footage of Booker T. Jones hands-down is one of the most mesmerizing music clips I’ve ever watched on YouTube. Observing the man explain how you “crawl” on the Hammond and seeing the joy he still gets out of playing the organ is just priceless. His voice isn’t shabby either! If you’re into soulful music craftsmanship and haven’t seen this yet, I would strongly encourage you to invest the 18 minutes it takes to watch this clip in its entirety.

In fact, if you’ve visited the blog in the past, you may have seen a previous feature I did on the Hammond B3 back in June 2017. That piece included the above clip as well, but it was kind of buried all the way at the end. I was reminded of this great footage last night when I talked to a keyboarder of a jam band. I told him Green Onions would be a cool addition to their set list and in this context mentioned Jones’ great demo and that he had to watch it. Did I mention I can have strong opinions about music? In any case, I felt featuring this clip again and this time doing it more prominently was warranted.

Apart from Jones sharing nice anecdotes from the past, including how his piano teacher changed his life, he plays three tunes: Green Onions, Born Under A Bad Sign and Down In MemphisGreen Onions became a signature tune for Booker T. & The M.G.s in 1962 and launched their career as a standalone act. Of course, they were primarily known as the house band of Stax Records where they backed such amazing artists like Wilson Pickett, Otis ReddingCarla Thomas and Albert King on hundreds of recordings.

Born Under A Bad Sign was co-written by Jones and Stax longtime recording artist William Bell for Albert King, who recorded it in 1967. The tune became the title track of King’s second studio album that appeared in August of the same year. Jones closes out his presentation with Down In Memphis, a new song at the time this footage was recorded. The track was included on Jones’ ninth studio album The Road From Memphis released in May 2011. I don’t recall having ever listened to that record, so I should go and check it out!

Sources: Wikipedia, YouTube