Clips & Pix: Neil Young with Crazy Horse/Milky Way

Today, Neil Young released Milky Way, the lead single from his upcoming album Colorado, the first with his long-time backing band Crazy Horse in seven years. The shaky voice, the ragged guitar sound and the overall style very much sound like classic Neil to me!

Based on Apple Music/iTunes, the album is slated for October 25 via Reprise Records and includes 10 tracks.¬†In late April, a post on the Neil Young Archives website noted, “We believe we have a great Crazy Horse album, one to stand alongside ‘Everybody Know’s this is nowhere’, ‘Rust Never Sleeps’, Sleeps With Angels’, ‘Psychedelic Pill’ and all the others” (quote includes typos! ūüôā )

The current line-up of Crazy Horse¬†features¬†Neil Young (guitars, vocals, piano, vibes, harmonica), Nils Lofgren (guitars, vocals, pump organ), Ralph Molina (drums, vocals) and Billy Talbot (bass, vocals). Talbot and Molina are original members of the band. Lofgren replaced Frank “Poncho” Sampedro who joined Crazy Horse in 1975 and retired last year.

Sources: Neil Young Archives, Apple Music, Pitchfork, YouTube

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Clips & Pix: Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band/Tenth Avenue Freeze-Out

Last night, I saw a tribute to Bruce Springsteen, so perhaps it’s not surprising The Boss is on my mind. One of my all-time favorite tunes from him and The E Street Band is Tenth Avenue Freeze-Out. The above extended version not only illustrates it’s a great song but also shows the compelling¬†power Springsteen and his band deliver live. I think he truly plays in a league of his own!

The Springsteen song is from his breakthrough album Born To Run. The soulful tune is one of the reasons this is my favorite Springsteen record.¬† The footage, by the way, is from a film that captures the two final dates in New York City from the band’s 1999-2000 reunion tour, which had been their first in eleven years. What a triumphant performance!

The mighty E Street Band that night featured Roy Bittan (piano, backing vocals), Steven Van Zandt (guitar, backing vocals), Garry Tallent (bass, backing vocals), Max Weinberg (drums), Nils Lofgren (guitar, backing vocals), Danny Federici (organ, accordion), Patti Scialfa (acoustic guitar, backing vocals) and, of course, the big man Clarence Clemons (saxophones). Except for Federici and Clemons, who passed away in 2008 and 2011, respectively, all of these amazing musicians remain members of the band to this day. Boy, this footage wants to see them again so badly!

Sources: Wikipedia, YouTube

Woodstock 50 Clips & Pix: Paul Butterfield Blues Band/Everything’s Gonna Be Alright (Part 4 of 4)

This is the final part of a 4-part mini series of clips to complement my previous post about Woodstock. The above incredible footage of the Paul Butterfield Blues Band is from Monday, August 19, 1969, the final day of the festival. According to Wikipedia, they performed from 6:00 to 6:45 am ET that day and were the third to last act.

Everything’s Gonna Be Alright was written by Walter¬†Jacobs, known as Little Walter, and first appeared on his 1969 album Hate To See You Go. The band’s powerful performance of the tune closed out their set.

In addition to Butterfield on lead vocals and harmonica, the band included Buzzy Feiten (guitar), Rod Hicks Р(bass, backing vocals), Philip Wilson (drums), Ted Harris (keyboards), Keith Johnson (trumpet), Steve Madaio (trumpet, backing vocals),  Gene Dinwiddie (soprano & tenor saxophones, backing vocals) and Trevor Lawrence (bariton saxophone, backing vocals).

Sources: Wikipedia, YouTube

Woodstock 50 Clips & Pix: Sly And The Family Stone/I Want To Take You Higher (Part 3 of 4)

Here is part 3 of a 4-part mini series of Woodstock clips to supplement my recent post about the festival. The above footage of Sly And The Family Stone is from Woodstock’s third day, Sunday, August 17, 1969. The band’s gig fell into the early morning hours (3:30 to 4:20 am ET, according to Wikipedia).

I Want To Take You Higher was written by front man Sly Stone. The tune is from their fourth studio album Stand!, which appeared in May 1969. It also became the b-side to the record’s single of the record’s title track released during the same year. The song is a great example of the band’s mixture of social messages with high-energy rock, soul, R&B, soul and psychedelia. It is simply impossible to watch this clip without starting to groove.

Formed in late 1966, the band’s members included¬†singer-songwriter, producer and multi-instrumentalist¬†Sly Stone, Sly’s brother Freddie Stone (guitar, vocals), his sister Rose Stone (keyboards, vocals) and his cousin¬†Larry Graham (bass), as well as¬†Cynthia Robinson (trumpet), Greg Errico (drums) and¬†Jerry Martini (saxophone). The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, into which Sly And The Family Stone were inducted in 1993, called them rock’s first integrated, multi-gender band and Woodstock their greatest triumph.

Sources: Wikipedia, Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, YouTube

Woodstock 50 Clips & Pix: Mountain/Southbound Train (Part 2 of 4)

This is part 2 of a 4-part mini series of Woodstock clips, which supplements my recent longer¬†post¬†to celebrate the music of the festival’s 50th anniversary. The footage shows American hard rock band¬†Mountain performing Southbound Train, a nice blues rocker. They were part of the line-up for Saturday evening, August 16, 1969, Woodstock’s second day. According to Wikipedia, they played from 9:00 to 10:00 pm ET.

Co-written by Mountain guitarist and lead vocalist¬†Leslie West and John Ventura, Southbound Train was included on West’s solo debut album Mountain¬†that came out in July 1969. The title ended up becoming the name of the band, which West co-founded shortly thereafter with bassist and album producer¬†Felix Pappalardi.

Previously, Pappalardi had collaborated with Cream and produced their second studio album Disraeli Gears from November 1967. Mountain’s other original members included Norman “N.D.” Smart (drums) and Steve Knight (keyboards). One of West’s influences was¬†Eric Clapton, and one can definitely hear some Cream in the above tune.

Sources: Wikipedia, YouTube

Woodstock 50 Clips & Pix: Tim Hardin/If I Were A Carpenter (Part 1 of 4)

Today 50 years ago, Woodstock kicked off in Bethel, N.Y. To celebrate one of the most pivotal moments in music history, I decided to feature a different clip for each of the four anniversary dates. While my recent Woodstock post was fairly long, I still felt I had to leave out lots of great music. This four-part mini series will feature additional songs.

August 15, 1969 was a Friday. The above clip shows one of the performers on the festival’s opening day, Tim Hardin, who played¬†in the evening (from 9:20 to 9:45 pm ET, according to Wikipedia). Written by him, If I Were A Carpenter became the American folk singer’s best known song, which first appeared on his second studio album,¬†Tim Hardin 2,¬†released in April 1967.

The tune was covered by many other artists, including Bobby Darin, Joan Baez, The Four Tops, Johnny Cash and June Carter, Bob Seger and Robert Plant. Darin’s cover turned out to be the highest charting, peaking at no. 8 on the Billboard Hot 100. Hardin’s original was a top 40 hit.

Sources: Wikipedia, YouTube

Clips & Pix: David Bowie/Space Oddity

While I wouldn’t call myself an all-out science enthusiast, I just can’t help but feeling a sense of excitement about the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11. Since the moon landing happened on July 20 five decades ago, which is kind of mind-boggling, it felt appropriate to post a clip that is related to space and space exploration. The first music artist coming to mind in this context is David Bowie, who clearly seemed to be fascinated by space.

Written by Bowie, Space Oddity was first released as a single on July 11, 1969, i.e., nine days prior to the moon landing. It also became the opening track of Bowie’s eponymous sophomore album that appeared in November of the same year. In 1972, it was reissued by RCA Records as Space Oddity – presumably after some clever marketing person there decided the new title would fuel sales, given the success of the song. Reissues in 2009 and 2015 reverted to the original title David Bowie.

Based on the chiron in the beginning of the clip, the above footage was taken from a live appearance of Bowie and his band on the American late-night TV music variety show The Midnight Special. The show premiered in August 1972 as a special on NBC and ran as a regular series from February 1973 until May 1981. Given Bowie’s looks, it’s safe to assume he was an early guest on the program.

Space Oddity, by the way, had nothing to do with the moon landing but instead was inspired by the 1968 Stanley Kubrick picture 2001: A Space Odyssey. Songfacts quotes Bowie from a 2003 interview with Performing Songwriter magazine: “In England, it was always presumed that it was written about the space landing, because it kind of came to prominence around the same time. But it actually wasn’t. It was written because of going to see the film¬†2001, which I found amazing. I was out of my gourd anyway, I was very stoned when I went to see it, several times, and it was really a revelation to me. It got the song flowing. ”

Bowie added, “It was picked up by the British television, and used as the background music for the landing itself. I’m sure they really weren’t listening to the lyric at all (laughs). It wasn’t a pleasant thing to juxtapose against a moon landing. Of course, I was overjoyed that they did. Obviously, some BBC official said, ‘Oh, right then, that space song, Major Tom, blah blah blah, that’ll be great.’ ‘Um, but he gets stranded in space, sir.’ Nobody had the heart to tell the producer that.” You just gotta love Bowie’s wit.

Well, I suppose most folks tend to pay more attention to the music than the lyrics. Perhaps the best example I can think of is Bruce Springsteen’s Born In The U.S.A., which was widely misunderstood as being an anthem and shamelessly misused by a politician.¬†In reality, of course, it was highly critical of the treatment of veterans returning home from war, which sadly remains a serious issue to this day.

Sources: Wikipedia, Songfacts, YouTube