Clips & Pix: Jimi Hendrix/Lover Man

This previously unreleased version of Lover Man by Jimi Hendrix is the third track from his upcoming posthumous album Both Sides Of The Sky, scheduled for release on March 9. According to Ultimate Classic Rock, Hendrix recorded this take of the blues rock tune in December 1969 with future Band Of Gypsys members Billy Cox (bass) and Buddy Miles (drums). This was less than a month before that band recorded their eponymous debut album, the last Hendrix studio record that appeared prior his death.

Written by Hendrix, Lover Man was modeled after Rock Me Baby by BB King, per Songfacts. Other versions of the tune can be heard on Valleys Of Neptune, a 2010 posthumous Hendrix album, the second of the trilogy that is concluded with Both Sides Of The Sky, as well as Isle Of Wright, a posthumous live album from 1971.

“Jimi loved the blues,” Eddie Kramer told Ultimate Classic Rock recently. “So did Billy, so did Buddy,” added Kramer, Hendrix’s recording engineer on all of his albums recorded during his lifetime and co-producer of the upcoming record. “Billy was always this wonderful counterpart. He did these fantastic runs, these lovely loping figures. Jimi was so happy to have that bouncy feeling beneath what he was doing. And you can’t have a record like this without the famous cement mixer. That’s what Mitch Mitchell used to say about Buddy — ‘He’s a bit of a cement mixer.’ No kidding. I mean, he was just the most amazing funk/R&B drummer, and I just love the way that Jimi’s solo just rips into that far-out distortion. It just shreds. I mean, that’s the ultimate shred solo.”

Sources: Ultimate Classic Rock, Songfacts, YouTube

Advertisements

Clips & Pix: Steve Winwood/Gimme Some Lovin’

Tonight Steve Winwood kicks off his Greatest Hits Live Tour in Chicago, so I felt like posting this cool clip of Gimme Some Lovin’. It was captured at a show in Baltimore last April during his 2017 World Tour.

Co-written by Steve (vocals, organ), his older brother Muff Winwood (bass) and Spencer Davis (guitar) and performed by the Spencer Davis Group, which also included Pete York on drums, Gimme Some Lovin’ was released as a single in October 1966. The tune became one of the band’s biggest hits, reaching no. 2 on the UK Singles Chart and no. 7 in the U.S.

Winwood’s new tour includes 13 additional dates and ends in Bethlehem, Pa on March 14. One of the gigs will be on March 8 at New Jersey Performing Arts Center in Newark, not far from my house. I’ve seen the man once before a few years ago, and it was a great show. His voice and roaring Hammond continue to excite me, so I think I’m gonna get a ticket and give him some lovin’!

Sources: Wikipedia, YouTube

Clips & Pix: Sonny Landreth & Derek Trucks/Congo Square

If you’re into electric slide guitar blues, check out this clip captured during Eric Clapton’s 2013 Crossroads blues festival, showing two of the finest artists in that genre: Sonny Landreth and Derek Trucks – damn!

Trucks, part of the Tedeschi Trucks Band and former member of The Allman Brothers Band, probably needs no further introduction. I’m not sure the same can be said about Landreth, who I don’t believe is widely known beyond blues circles. Admittedly, I wasn’t aware of this ace slide guitarist either, until a good friend recommended that I check him out – BTW, the same friend who told me about this new Tom Petty live box set covered in my previous post. If you like Petty, you’re going to love this!

Congo Square was co-written by Landreth, Mel Melton and David Ranson. Melton heads a blues band with the awesome name The Wicked Mojos. Ranson is a bassist, who frequently plays with Landreth and is also in the clip. The tune appears on Landreth’s fourth studio album South Of I-10, which was released in 1995. You can bet I’m going to check out additional music from him!

Sources: Wikipedia, YouTube

Clips & Pix: Jimi Hendrix/Hear My Train A Coming

The above clip is the second tune released yesterday (February 15) in advance of Both Sides Of The Sky, a posthumous album by Jimi Hendrix, set to come out March 9. Written by Hendrix and first recorded in London in 1967, Hear My Train A Coming became a staple during Hendrix live shows but didn’t appear on any of his albums until now.

According to a USA Today story, this version of the blues shredder was recorded in New York in April 1969 and was partially inspired by Muddy Waters, one Hendrix’s influences. It is one of the last songs recorded by The Jimi Hendrix Experience, which in addition to Hendrix included bassist Noel Redding and drummer Mitch Michell.

“I love the feeling of being life in the studio ,” commented Eddie Kramer, recording engineer for every Hendrix album during the guitarist’s life, during a video interview posted on the official Hendrix Facebook page. “This is an absolutely right-on performance from Jimi,” added Kramer who co-produced the record with John McDermott and Jimi’s sister and Janie Hendrix, head of the Hendrix estate. See clip below for entire interview.

While this new tune is cool, I think I prefer the previous upfront release of Mannish Boy. The forthcoming record also features various collaborations that sound intriguing, including with Stephen Stills on the Joni Mitchell tune Woodstock, and Johnny Winter on Things I Used to Do, a blues track written and released by New Orleans blues guitarist Guitar Slim in 1953.

Sources: Wikipedia, USA Today, Jimi Hendrix Facebook page, Rolling Stone, YouTube

Clips & Pix: Lynyrd Skynyrd/Gimme Three Steps

The above performance of Gimme Three Steps by Lynyrd Skynyrd apparently was captured during a 2015 gig at Jacksonville’s Florida Theatre. According to Setlist.fm, the southern rockers played two shows at this venue in early April that year.

Co-written by founding members Allen Collins (guitarist) and Ronnie Van Zant (lead vocalist), Gimme Three Steps is from the band’s debut album (Pronounced ‘Lĕh-‘nérd ‘Skin-‘nérd), which was released in August 1973. The song also appeared separately as the record’s lead single in November that year. While the tune became one of Skynyrd’s staples, it didn’t chart at the time.

Today, guitarist Gary Rossington remains the only founding member. Ronnie’s brother Johnny Van Zant has been Skynyrd’s lead vocalist since 1987, when the members of the band who survived the 1977 plane crash re-formed for a reunion tour with him. Guitarist Rickey Medlocke, who first played with Skynyrd from 1971 to 1972, has been part of the current line-up since his return in 1996. Michael Cartellone (drums), Mark Matejka (guitar), Peter Keys (keyboards) and Keith Christopher (bass) joined in 1999, 2006, 2009 and 2017, respectively.

Three weeks ago, Lynyrd Skynyrd announced their final tour, which will feature  numerous special guests, such as Bad Company, Marshall Tucker Band and 38 Special. The first leg of the Last Of The Street Survivors Farewell Tour will kick off on May 4 in West Palm Beach, Fla. and conclude in Atlanta on September 1. One of the dates in-between is PNC Bank Arts Center in Holmdel, NJ on June 22, right in my backyard. Since I’ve never seen these guys, I couldn’t resist and got a ticket.

Sources: Wikipedia, Setlist.fm, Lynyrd Skynyrd website, YouTube

Clips & Pix: Cream/White Room

Posting the above clip was inspired by a documentary I watched on Showtime last night, Eric Clapton: A Life In 12 Bars, thanks to Music Enthusiast, who had flagged it in an earlier post yesterday. While overall the film primarily focused on Eric Clapton, the person and his quest for love and brutal struggle with heroin and alcohol addiction, and less on Clapton, the musician, at least the first half featured some great footage about his early musical journey with the Yardbirds, John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers, Blind Faith, Derek and the Dominos and, of course, Cream.

The above killer performance of White Room is from Cream’s 1968 farewell performance at London’s Royal Albert Hall. Composed by the band’s amazing bassist and lead vocalist Jack Bruce, with lyrics by poet Pete Brown, White Room has always been one of my favorite blues rock tunes. It appeared on Cream’s third studio album Wheels Of Fire from July 1968.

I don’t particularly care whether or not the rock power trio, which in addition to Bruce and Clapton also included drummer Ginger Baker, is “the world’s first successful supergroup.” They simply were a kick ass blues rock band, and that’s good enough for me!

Sources: Wikipedia, YouTube

Clips & Pix: The Who/Won’t Get Fooled Again

After seeing a Facebook post about Who’s Next, a very cool tribute band to The Who, I just felt like listening to the real me. Above is a killer live version of one the band’s anthems, or make that rock music in general, captured sometime during the ’70s.

The Who were truly on top of their game during that performance of Won’t Get Fooled Again. The intensity of each of these guys was just through the roof! In a weird way, they oftentimes seemed compete against each other on stage more so than playing with each other. And while this would probably spell death for most other bands, not only did it work for The Who, it made them even more compelling.

Written by Pete Townshend, Won’t Get Fooled Again was the lead single for Who’s Next, the band’s fifth studio release. The more radio-friendly 3:36-minute take appeared in June 1971, about two months ahead of the record. The full album version clocks in at a mighty 8:32 minutes.

The single peaked at no. 9 on the UK Singles Chart and reached no. 15 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100. Won’t Get Fooled Again is ranked at no. 134 on Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 Greatest Songs Of All Time. It is truely remarkable that after now 45-plus years, the tune still sounds amazing.

Sources: Wikipedia, Rolling Stone, YouTube