Clips & Pix: Larkin Poe/Fly Away

As more frequent visitors of the blog know, I really dig Larkin Poe, an American blues and roots sister act of singer-songwriters and multi-instrumentalists Rebecca Lovell (lead vocals, guitar, mandolin, banjo, violin, piano; programs drums, bass and arrangements) and Megan Lovell (harmony vocals, lapsteel, dobro). Not only do I admire their instrumental skills and harmony singing, but I also find their energy and enthusiasm infectious. To me, they truly represent what music should be all about!

This version of Lenny Kravtiz tune Fly Away, released on October 9, will be included on Larkin Poe’s next studio album Kindred Spirits, a collection of acoustic cover versions scheduled for November 20. As Rebecca and Megan explain on their YouTube channel, the album was inspired by positive reactions to their cover video series they started in 2015. I could watch these two women for hours, as they strip down songs like Steppenwolf’s Born to be Wild, Kansas’ Carry On Wayward Son, Joe Walsh’s Rocky Mountain Way and ZZ Top’s Sharp Dressed Man, to name some of their more recent additions.

Kravitz, who wrote Fly Away, first recorded the tune for his fifth studio album 5 that came out in May 1998. The tune was also released separately in December that year as the record’s fourth single.

Following is the track list for Kindred Spirit, which will appear on Larkin Poe’s Tricky Woo Records imprint, as reported by JamBase:

  1. Hellhound On My Trail (Robert Johnson)
  2. Fly Away (Lenny Kravitz)
  3. Rockin’ In The Free World (Neil Young)
  4. (You’re The) Devil In Disguise (Elvis Presley)
  5. In The Air Tonight (Phil Collins)
  6. Nights In White Satin (The Moody Blues)
  7. Who Do You Love (Bo Diddley)
  8. Take What You Want (Post Malone)
  9. Ramblin’ Man (The Allman Brothers)
  10. Bell Bottom Blues (Derek & The Dominoes)
  11. Crocodile Rock (Elton John)

Sources: Wikipedia; JamBase; YouTube

Clips & Pix: John Lennon/Gimme Some Truth

I’m sick and tired of hearing things from
Uptight short sided narrow minded hypocritics
All I want is the truth, just give me some truth
I’ve had enough of reading things
By neurotic psychotic pigheaded politicians
All I want is the truth, just give me some truth

Yesterday, on what would have been John Lennon’s 80th birthday, I found myself listening to the just-released new solo collection Gimme Some Truth. After six previous box collections one might ask did we really need yet another collection and is this simply an attempt to cash in on the occasion?

While I’m sure Capitol/UMe won’t mind making a buck or two out of the release, I want to believe making money wasn’t the real motivation for Yoko Ono Lennon and Sean Ono Lennon, who picked the tunes and executive-produced the collection. Perhaps I’m a bit naive here.

All 36 tracks were completely remixed and engineered by Paul Hicks who was assisted by Sam Gannon. Both also worked together on the previous Lennon solo collection Imagine – The Ultimate Collection, which came out in October 2018.

According to a previous announcement, the songs were completely remixed from scratch, using brand new transfers of the original multi-tracks, cleaned up to the highest possible sonic quality. After weeks of painstaking preparation, the final mixes and effects were completed using only vintage analog equipment and effects at Henson Recording Studios in Los Angeles, and then mastered in analog at Abbey Road Studios by Alex Wharton in order to ensure the most beautiful and authentic sound quality possible.

Currently, I don’t have a great music setup at my house, so I cannot really verify the improvements of these remixes. Based on reviews I’ve seen, apparently, the sound quality is very good.

While I’m not going to review the new collection, I decided to call out the title track. Gimme Some Truth was written by John Lennon and first recorded for his second solo album Imagine from September 1971. It features a slide guitar solo played by George Harrison.

Lennon wrote the tune during a time when he was being investigated by the FBI as an inconvenient political rabble-rouser over concerns by the Nixon Administration he would disrupt the 1972 Republican National Convention. He expressed his frustration over “short sided narrow minded hypocritics”, “neurotic psychotic pigheaded politicians” and “schizophrenic egocentric paranoiac primadonnas.”

I was really struck by how well the lyrics fit our current situation where we find ourselves being lied to by Tricky Dickies on television. Every day. One wonders how John Lennon would have reacted to the current state of affairs, if he still would have been around today.

Sources: Wikipedia; Capitol/UMe press release; Songfacts; YouTube

Clips & Pix: Stevie Ray Vaughan/Pride and Joy

This must be one of my most spontaneous posts. I literally just came across this cool clip of Stevie Ray Vaughan and decided I had to put it on the blog.

Usually, there’s some of sort of angle to my posts. Not so in this case. The sole fact this footage is just so much fun to watch is good enough for me. It’s from a July 1982 show of Vaughan and his backing band Double Trouble at the Montreux Jazz Festival in Switzerland.

While the performance was dynamite, unfortunately, it was met by boos from the audience. Part of the reason for the reception was the band’s booking during an acoustic night at the prestigious event. High volume electric blues simply wasn’t a good fit. Plus, Vaughan was still an unsigned act, who was completely unknown outside of Texas.

Pride and Joy, written by Vaughan, was first recorded for his studio debut Texas Flood released in June 1983. There’s also a live album with material from the above concert and a 1985 appearance, which came out in November 2001. By the time of their second Montreux show, Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble not only were well received, but also were headliners. What a difference!

Sources: Wikipedia; YouTube

Clips & Pix: Tom Petty/Confusion Wheel

This tune should have been included in my last Best of What’s New installment from Friday, but I missed it. Confusion Wheel is a previously unreleased song by Tom Petty, which be on the forthcoming box-set Wildflowers and All the Rest slated for October 16.

According to a short announcement on Petty’s website on September 8, “Confusion Wheel,” written in 1994, eerily captures the uncertainty of 2020 as if it were written yesterday and somehow twists it with infinite hope. Yesterday, Heartbreaker Benmont Tench and Tom’s longtime engineer and co-producer Ryan Ulyate spoke to David Fricke and premiered the previously unreleased song on SiriusXM’s Tom Petty Radio. Listen/share “Confusion Wheel,” alongside a visualizer featuring artwork by Blaze Ben Brooks.

As previously reported by Variety and other media outlets, Wildflowers and All the Rest was jointly curated by Tom’s wife and daughters Dana, Adria and Annakim Petty, respectively, along with former Heartbreakers Mike Campbell and Tench. The collection was produced by Ulyate. In addition to remastered versions of the original Wildflowers tracks, the box set features home recordings/demos, live tracks and various previously unreleased songs.

I really miss Tom Petty, so looking forward to this release!

Sources: Tom Petty website; Variety; YouTube

Clips & Pix: Popa Chubby/It’s a Mighty Hard Road

Shout-out to my brother-in-law who brought Popa Chubby to my attention earlier today. Before then, I had never heard of the 60-year-old electric blues-focused guitarist and songwriter from the Bronx, New York, who was born Theodore Joseph “Ted” Horowitz.

Chubby has been playing music for more than 30 years. On his website he describes his style as “the Stooges meets Buddy Guy, Motörhead meets Muddy Waters, and Jimi Hendrix meets Robert Johnson.” These are many names to throw around, but based on YouTube clips I have seen it’s not just empty words.

The above tune is the title track of Chubby’s most recent album that came out in March this year in celebration of his 30th anniversary as a blues artist. It’s one of 13 original tracks on the record that also includes covers of Freddie King’s I’d Rather be Blind and Prince’s Kiss.

I’m pretty sure I’m going to further explore Chubby and write more about him. Until then I’ll leave you with this cool rendition of Jim Hendrix’s Hey Joe captured in 2011 on the German music TV program Rockpalast.

Sources: Wikipedia; Popa Chubby website; YouTube

Clips & Pix: Nick Mason’s Saucerful of Secrets/See Emily Play

I just came across the above clip of See Emily Play performed by Nick Mason’s Saucerful of Secrets. It’s from an upcoming album titled Live at the Roundhouse, which is scheduled for September 18 and will be available as a double-CD/DVD package, double-vinyl and on Blu-ray. The material was taken from concerts the band played at the famous London venue in May 2019.

Nick Mason, of course, is the former co-founder and drummer of Pink Floyd and the band’s only member who played on all of their studio albums. In 2018, he formed Nick Mason’s Saucerful of Secrets together with guitarist Lee Harris. Other members of the band, which takes their name from Floyd’s 1968 sophomore album, include Gary Kemp (guitar, vocals), formerly with Spandau Ballet; Guy Pratt (bass, vocals) and Dom Beken (keyboards).

The idea behind Saucerful is to perform Pink Floyd’s early music prior to the The Dark Side of the Moon album. “We’re not a tribute band,” Mason told Uncut in May 2018. “It’s not important to play the songs exactly as they were, but to capture the spirit.”

Whatever you want to call them, I think it’s great fans of Floyd’s early years including the Syd Barrett era have an opportunity to hear tracks that haven’t been played live for decades like Interstellar Overdrive, Astronomy Domine, If, The Nile Song and, of course, See Emily Play. Written by Barrett, the tune appeared on Floyd’s debut album The Piper at the Gates of Dawn.

Now that I’ve watched the clip and other footage that’s on YouTube, I’m starting to regret I didn’t catch the band in April 2019 when they played the Beacon Theatre in New York City. A few weeks earlier, I had seen outstanding tribute band Brit Floyd, so I didn’t feel like going to another show of Pink Floyd music. Due to COVID-19, Nick Mason’s Saucerful of Secrets had to reschedule many gigs in England and elsewhere in Europe until next year. Their currently planned schedule is here.

Sources: Wikipedia; Uncut; Nick Mason’s Saucerful of Secrets website; YouTube

Clips & Pix: Procol Harum/A Whiter Shade of Pale

We skipped the light fandango/Turned cartwheels ‘cross the floor/I was feeling kinda seasick/But the crowd called out for more/The room was humming harder/As the ceiling flew away/When we called out for another drink/The waiter brought a tray…

I had not listened to this Procul Harum classic for several years and caught it by chance on the radio in the car earlier this evening- damn, what a truly magnificent tune! A Whiter Shade of Pale was the British rock band’s debut single that appeared in May 1967. And what an impact it made! Within just a month, the tune climbed to the top of the U.K. Singles Chart where it stayed for six weeks. In the U.S., it reached no. 5 on the Billboard Hot 100. And apparently all of it without much promotion.

A Whiter Shade of Pale was co-written by Procul Harum’s pianist and lead vocalist Gary Brooker, together with lyricist Keith Reid and Matthew Fisher, a singer-songwriter who played the beautiful Hammond on the recording. “It’s sort of a film, really, trying to conjure up mood and tell a story,” Reid told Songfacts. “It’s about a relationship. There’s characters and there’s a location, and there’s a journey. You get the sound of the room and the feel of the room and the smell of the room. But certainly there’s a journey going on, it’s not a collection of lines just stuck together. It’s got a thread running through it.”

Songfacts also notes the title came to Reid at a party, which gave him a starting point for the lyrics. Brooker and Reid formed Procul Harum in April 1967, together with Fisher, Ray Royer (guitar) and David Knights (bass). The band’s original manager Guy Stevens came up with the name, inspired by a Burmese cat, Procul Harun.

Between the amazing Hammond organ line that’s derived from a classical piece by German Baroque period composer Johann Sebastian Bach and Brooker’s soulful singing, I loved this tune from the very first time I heard it many moons ago. I still get goosebumps. Interestingly, A Whiter Shade of Pale became Procul Harum’s biggest hit by far. The band broke up in 1977, reformed in 1991 and exists to this day, with 75-year-old Brooker remaining as the only original member.

Sources: Wikipedia; Songfacts; YouTube

Clips & Pix: Paul McCartney/A Day in the Life/Give Peace a Chance and Let It Be

I literally just came across this beautiful clip and simply couldn’t resist posting it. Apparently, this footage was captured at Paul McCartney’s inaugural concerts at New York’s Citi Field, where he played three dates – July 17, 18 and 21 – during his summer 2009 tour. These gigs also resulted in the live album Good Evening New York City, which appeared in November of the same the year.

Yes, Sir Paul plays Let It Be during all his solo shows, but it remains a timeless classic. Plus, I don’t think the same can be said about A Day in the Life. And how about that snippet from Give Peace a Chance? This almost looks like he was doing a memorial medley, for John Lennon, who mostly wrote A Day in the Life and of course also penned Give Peace a Chance.

To me, Macca is the born live artist. It’s remarkable how after all these decades he still seems to get so much joy from performing. I just love it! Yes, nowadays, his voice is showing some signs of wear. But let’s not forget the man is 78 years old. And, honestly, I feel his enthusiasm makes up for it! I’ve seen him twice and hope I can see him again at least one more time!

Sources: Wikipedia; Setlist.fm; YouTube

Clips & Pix: The Doors/Riders on the Storm

My area of Central New Jersey was hit by tropical storm Isaias this afternoon. We got a good deal of fallen tree branches around my property and had a few near misses, but fortunately, nobody got hurt and we didn’t encounter significant damage either. We’re also not among the two million folks in the area who lost electricity, so it’s a happy outcome.

After being exposed to howling wind for a few hours, perhaps it’s not surprising that storm was on my mind. So I cleverly thought I feature one of my favorite storm songs: Riders on the Storm by The Doors.

Credited to all four members of the band, John Densmore (drums), Robby Krieger (guitar), Ray Manzarek (keyboards) and Jim Morrison (vocals), the tune first appeared on their sixth studio album L.A. Woman from April 1971. A shortened version was also released separately as the record’s second single in June of the same year.

Riders on the Storm charted in many countries – hard to imagine from today’s dismal chart perspective! In the U.S. and the UK, the song reached no. 14 and no. 22, respectively. It topped the charts in France. The tune also did well in Canada and the Netherlands where it climbed to no. 7.

Not even a month after the single had come out, Jim Morrison passed away on July 3, 1971 in Paris, France at the age of 27. While the official cause of death was listed as heart failure, there were reports he actually died from an overdose of heroin.

Sources: Wikipedia; YouTube

Clips & Pix: Fleetwood Mac/Albatross

As some of my fellow bloggers noted, distinguished British blues rock guitarist and singer-songwriter Peter Green passed away today at the age of 73. I had been all immersed in working on my previous post and entirely missed the sad news.

Green certainly deserves better than a measly clip, and I’m planning to do more on him in the future. For now, I’d like to acknowledge the death of this outstanding musician with what I believe is one of the most beautiful instrumental tracks I know: Albatross, which Green wrote in 1968 for Fleetwood Mac, the band he founded in 1967 after his departure from John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers.

The band’s very first incarnation was called Peter Green’s Fleetwood Mac featuring Jeremy Spencer. By the time their debut album was released in February 1968, they had become Peter Green’s Fleetwood Mac and simply Fleetwood Mac when their sophomore Mr. Wonderful appeared in August 1968.

Albatross first came out as a non-album single in November 1968. The dreamy track was also included on The Pious Bird of Good Omen, Mac’s second compilation album from August 1969. I think Albatross has comparable beauty to Carlos Santana’s Samba Pa Ti and Europa (Earth’s Cry Heaven’s Smile), two of my all-time favorite electric guitar-driven instrumentals.

Sources: Wikipedia; YouTube