Clips & Pix: Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers/The Final Show

The above clip captures the final show of Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers at the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles on September 25. It was the third of three nights at the legendary venue. This gig was also the last concert of the band’s 40th anniversary tour. It’s still hard to believe that exactly one week thereafter, Petty passed away at only 66 years of age. Not sure how long this clip is going to stay on YouTube, so enjoy while it lasts!

Following is the set list for that final show, along with the album on which each song first appeared. Notably, half of the tracks are from Petty’s first two solo albums. But there is a connection to The Heartbreakers, since both of these records included members of the band.

Rockin’ Around (With You) [Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers, 1976]

Mary Jane’s Last Dance [Greatest Hits, 1993]

Don’t You Know How It Feels [Wildflowers, 1994; second Tom Petty solo album]

Forgotten Man [Hypnotic Eye, 2014]

I Won’t Back Down [Full Moon Fever, 1989; first Tom Petty solo album]

Free Fallin’ [Full Moon Fever, 1989; first Tom Petty solo album]

Breakdown [Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers, 1976]

Don’t Come Around Here No More [Southern Accents, 1985]

It’s Good To Be King [Wildflowers, 1994; second Tom Petty solo album]

Crawling Back To You [Wildflowers, 1994; second Tom Petty solo album]

Wildflowers [Wildflowers, 1994; second Tom Petty solo album]

Learning To Fly [Into The Great Wide Open, 1991]

Yer So Bad [Full Moon Fever, 1989; first Tom Petty solo album]

I Should Have Known About It [Mojo, 2010]

Refugee [Damn The Torpedoes, 1979]

Runnin’ Down A Dream [Full Moon Fever, 1989; first Tom Petty solo album]

Encore:

You Wreck Me [Wildflowers, 1994; second Tom Petty solo album]

American Girl [Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers, 1976]

The final word goes to the kick-ass musicians of The Heartbreakers. The line-up included Mike Campbell (guitar), Scott Thurston (guitar, harmonica), Benmont Tench (keyboards), Ron Blair (bass) and Steve Ferrone (drums). The backing singers were Charlie Webb and Hattie Webb from England, who are known as The Webb Sisters.

How fond Petty was of his musicians becomes very clear when he introduces them, which starts at approximately 52 minutes and 10 seconds into the clip. His comments also reflect a great sense of humor. If you don’t feel like watching the entire 2 hours and 4 minutes, make sure you catch Petty’s introduction of the musicians.

Sources: Wikipedia, Setlist, YouTube

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Clips And Pix: The Church/Under The Milky Way Tonight

After raving about Under The Milky Way Tonight in my previous post, I thought I might as well put up a clip of the tune. Apparently, this live performance was captured during the induction of The Church into the Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) Hall of Fame in 2010.

Steve Kilbey, the band’s songwriter and bassist co-wrote the tune with his then domestic partner Karin Jansson, guitarist of the Swedish punk band Champagne. It was included on The Church’s fifth studio album Starfish, released in February 1988. The song also appeared separately as the record’s lead single.

Under The Milky Way Tonight brought The Church significant mainstream success in Australia and beyond. In the U.S., the track peaked at no. 24 on the Billboard Hot 100 and climbed all the way up to no. 2 on the Mainstream Rock chart. It also charted in New Zealand, Canada, the U.K. and The Netherlands. While I don’t know about the German charts, I definitely recall the song got significant radio play at the time. That’s where I first heard it.

Sources: Wikipedia, YouTube

Clips & Pix: The Breakers/Soulfire

I think it’s fair to say that soul-oriented rock isn’t the first thing that comes to mind when thinking about Denmark. But this band called The Breakers did exactly that. And they sounded pretty darn well, in my opinion.

Steven Van Zandt produced some of their music on his garage rock label Wicked Cool Records and co-wrote this cool tune with the band’s guitarist Anders Bruus. On the label’s website, Van Zandt described their music as follows: “A Stax-like rhythm section, Stones-y guitars, and some of the most soulful singing I’ve ever heard, delivering songs both Smokey Robinson and Van Morrison would be proud of.” BTW, that’s the same Soulfire Van Zandt recorded as the title song of his most recent album with The Disciples of Soul.

To me singer Toke Nisted’s raspy voice sounds a bit like the early Rod Stewart. No wonder Wikipedia notes that The Faces were among the band’s influences. Sadly, it appears the band broke up in late 2012 after a 10-year run.

Sources: Wikipedia, Wicked Cool Records website, YouTube

Clips & Pix: Paul McCartney & Bruce Springsteen/I Saw Her Standing Here

This great clip was captured Friday night at Madison Square Garden in New York, where Bruce Springsteen and Steven Van Zandt joined Paul McCartney on stage during the encore of McCartney’s sold out show there. These guys had so much fun that they literally did the song twice – priceless!

It doesn’t even matter that McCartney’s voice sounds a bit strained. According to setlist.fm, the back-to-back performances of I Saw Her Standing There were tracks 36 and 37, so it must have been well over two and a half hours into the show. Plus, the song that immediately preceded this was Helter Skelter. To me it is just amazing how strongly Sir Paul is still going at age 75. I saw it myself last July and posted about it here. This clip with The Boss makes me want to see him again – and while we’re at it, Springsteen as well!

Penned by McCartney and John Lennon, I Saw Her Standing There was the opener to Please Please Me, the studio debut by The Beatles, which appeared in March 1963. The tune was also released separately in the U.S. as the B-side to I Want To Hold Your Hand, the Fab Four’s first U.S. single that came out in December that year.

Sources: Wikipedia, Billboard, Setlist.fm, YouTube

Clips & Pix: Scorpions/Rock You Like a Hurricane

Do these look like guys who are ready to retire? Sure, lead singer Klaus Meine and guitarist Rudolf Schenker are 69 (the remaining members of the Scorpions are a good deal younger, ranging from bassist Pawel Mąciwoda [50] to guitarist Matthias Jabs [61]). Still, I didn’t quite believe it when the band announced retirement plans a few years ago. And while rock & roll undoubtedly doesn’t get any easier with increasing age, it seems to me this band continues to have lots of gas left in the tank.

Rock You Like a Hurricane, one of my favorite Scorpions tunes, is from their ninth studio album Love At First Sting, which was released in March 1984. While much of heavy metal is not my cup of tea, the Scorpions have demonstrated time and again that combining heavy rock with catchy melodies can make for terrific music. Of course, the band is just as much known for their softer ballads, but when they rock they truly do.

Sources: Wikipedia, YouTube

Clips & Pix: Johnny Winter/Rock and Roll, Hoochie Koo

A killer blues rock, Rock and Roll, Hoochie Koo was written by Rick Derringer and first recorded by Johnny Winter for his fourth studio album And from September 1970. At the time, And was also the name of Winter’s band, which included Derringer.

In 1973, Derringer recorded a solo version of Rock and Roll, Hoochie Koo. It was the lead track for his studio debut All American Boy, which appeared in October that year. This version became Derringer’s biggest hit, peaking at no. 23 on the Billboard Hot 100.

The above clip was captured from a Winter show at Palace Theatre in Waterbury, Conn. on April 20, 1973. He was backed by Richard Hughes (drums) and Randy Jo Hobbs (bass).

Sources: Wikipedia, Setlist.fm, YouTube

Clips & Pix: Alice Cooper/School’s Out

One of Mr. Shock Rock’s defining tunes

To say it right upfront, I know very little about Alice Cooper, so cannot claim to be a fan. Yet, I’m seeing him tomorrow night as part of a double feature with Deep Purple, my favorite hard rock band since I was 14 or so, when I got the Machine Head album on vinyl – still own it to this day! Cooper’s School’s Out is one of a handful of his tunes I know and kind of think is cool. The following clip was captured back in May during a show in Ohio.

Credited to all members of the Alice Cooper Band, who in addition to Cooper included Michael Bruce (rhythm guitar, keyboards, backing vocals), Glen Buxton (lead guitar), Dennis Dunaway (bass, backing vocals) and Neal Smith (drums backing vocals), School’s Out was first released as a single in April 1972. It’s the title track of the band’s fifth studio album, which appeared in June that year.

The tune became Cooper’s first big hit, peaking at no. 7 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 pop singles chart and catapulting the album to climb to no. 2 on the Billboard 200. In the U.K., the song did even better, hitting no. 1 on the U.K. Singles Chart. In 2011, School’s Out was also ranked at 326 in Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

Sources: Wikipedia, Rolling Stone, YouTube