Clips And Pix: Paul McCartney/Mother Nature’s Son

This clip felt right to post on Earth Day. Usually, I try to keep this a “happy” blog and stay away from social issues. No matter where one stands politically, preserving our planet shouldn’t be about politics in the first place. But sadly this country continues to be more divided than ever. And, as mind-boggling as it is in the 21st Century, there are still folks out there who believe climate change is a hoax or that mankind can somehow beat the laws of chemistry, physics and biology – and most of it for selfish short-term gain!

Anyway, to get back to music, according to Songfacts, Paul McCartney wrote Mother Nature’s Son after listening to a speech from Maharishi Mahesh Yogi in India, where The Beatles were attending a camp to learn transcendental meditation. McCartney recorded the tune by himself in two sessions on August 9 and 20, 1968. It was included on the “White Album,” The Beatles’ ninth studio record that appeared in November 1968.

In October 2008, McCartney told Mojo magazine the song was influenced by Nature Boy, a Nat King Cole standard from 1948. “At that time I considered myself a guy leaning towards the countryside,” he reportedly said. “But I would have to tip a wink to Nature Boy. Though, when you think about it, the only thing they have in common is the word ‘nature’- the rest of the link is pretty tenuous.”

Sources: Wikipedia, Songfacts, YouTube

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Clips & Pix: Bob Dylan & The Band/I Shall Be Released

Yesterday (April 7) was the 40th anniversary of the release of The Last Waltz, the triple LP album by The Band and soundtrack to the 1978 concert film directed by Martin Scorsese. The album and picture document the group’s official farewell concert at the Winterland Ballroom in San Francisco on Thanksgiving Day in 1976.

The Bob Dylan tune I Shall Be Released was the closing number of the official show. In addition to Dylan and The Band, it featured other high caliber guests, who had performed earlier during the show, including Van Morrison, Neil Young, Joni Mitchell, Eric Clapton, Ringo Starr, Ronnie Wood, Ronnie Hawkins and Neil Diamond.

Many critics have called the film one of the best rock concert movies; however, not everybody agreed. Notably, The Band’s Levon Helm charged the film portrays The Band as sidemen of Robbie Robertson. He also called it “the biggest fuckin’ rip-off that ever happened to the Band,” adding he and the other group members Rick Danko, Garth Hudson and Richard Manuel didn’t earn a dime from the film and the soundtrack album.

Sources: Wikipedia, YouTube

Clips & Pix: Dr. Feelgood/Down At The Doctors

Earlier today, I came across Down At The Doctors, a tune by British pub rockers Dr. Feelgood I’ve always liked. The song, which was written by Mickey Jupp, is the opener of Private Practice, the band’s sixth studio album from October 1978.

The first time I heard Down At The Doctors was the great version from Dr. Feelgood’s live album As It Happens, released in June 1979. The clip looks like it could be from around that time. It features the band’s co-founder and original lead vocalist and harmonica player Lee Brilleaux. He passed away from cancer in April 1994.

Dr. Feelgood is still around and has a busy touring schedule, though the current line-up includes none of the original members.

Sources: Wikipedia, YouTube

Clips & Pix: John Fogerty/Have You Ever Seen The Rain

Given I just got a ticket for the 2018 John Fogerty/ZZ Top Blues and Bayous Tour, Fogerty is very much on my mind. If I could only choose one song by Creedence Clearwater Revival, which admittedly would almost be impossible, I’d go with Have You Ever Seen The Rain? I just love this tune – plain and simple!

One of the many hits Fogerty wrote for the band, Have You Ever Seen The Rain? became a single backed with Hey Tonight, another ace tune, released in January 1971. Both songs were included on CCR’s sixth studio album Pendulum, which appeared in December 1970.

The song is a perfect illustration of Fogerty’s great ability to write simple tunes with great melodies. Most of the time, that’s when rock tends to be best, in my opinion.

I could have selected a more recent performance (in fact as recent as from 2017), but this is all concert footage captured by fans on smartphones, and as such the quality isn’t particularly great. Therefore, I went with this clip that apparently is from The Long Road Home – In Concert, a DVD and double-live album Fogerty put out in June 2006.

Sources: Wikipedia, YouTube

Clips & Pix: John Fogerty & Billy Gibbons/ Sharp Dressed Man

This clip is just too much fun to watch and not to post – John Fogerty and ZZ Top’s Billy Gibbons rocking out to Sharp Dressed Man! Apparently, this was captured during a gig Fogerty played last year in Tulsa, Okla. as part of his 2016 tour. Gibbons was a guest. Seeing the mutual respect these guys have for each other and the fun playing together, I suppose it’s not a big surprise they’re teaming up for a John Fogerty/ZZ Top double headliner this year, the Blues and Bayous Tour. That’s one I don’t wanna miss, so I already got a ticket!

Credited to Gibbons and his longtime band mates Dusty Hill and Frank Beard, Sharp Dressed Man, of course, is one of ZZ Top’s best known tunes. It became the third single from their eighth studio album Eliminator that was released in March 1983. Fueled by that tune, as well as Gimme All Your Lovin, Got Me Under Pressure and Legs, the album became ZZ Top’s most successful commercial release, selling more than 10 million copies in the U.S. alone.

Personally, I prefer the band’s edgier 70s albums, but even during their most commercial phase, the three Texans were just cool dudes! Plus, they always seemed to have a good sense of humor. Who can forget these hilarious videos they made during the 80s – rotating guitars anybody? Priceless!

Sources: Wikipedia, YouTube

 

Clips & Pix: The Rolling Stones/Brown Sugar

This killer version of Brown Sugar by The Rolling Stones is from Sticky Fingers Live At The Fonda Theatre 2015. In early January, I posted another clip, Can’t You Hear Me Knocking, from this album, which appeared in September 2017 as part of the band’s From The Vault series.

The Stones’ dynamic during their performance before an audience of some 1,200 people at The Fonda Theatre in Hollywood on May 20, 2015 was through the roof. You can also see how much fun they had. This was clearly not some routine gig. These guys left their hearts and souls on that stage!

Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, Brown Sugar is the opener of the 1971 Sticky Fingers album, which the above show celebrated. By the way, it remains the only gig to date, during which The Stones performed what was their ninth British and 11th U.S. studio record in its entirety.

Brown Sugar was also released in April 1971 as the album’s lead single and became the 6th Stones single to top the U.S. Billboard Hot 100. It would take until August 1973 before they scored another no. 1 in the U.S. with Angie. In the UK, Brown Sugar peaked at no. 2 on the Singles Chart. Rolling Stone ranked the tune at no. 5 on its 100 Greatest Guitar Songs Of All Time list.

Sources: Wikipedia, http://www.stonesfromthevault.com, YouTube

Clips & Pix: Buddy Guy & B.B. King/Stay Around A Little Longer

Earlier this week, I spotted this great clip on the website of the B.B. King Blues Club & Grill in New York City, where I will be in mid-April to see Buddy Guy. Sadly, his partner in the recording B.B. King passed away in May 2015 at the age of 89. While it will be my second time for Guy, unfortunately, I never saw King.

Written by Tom Hambridge and Gary Nicholson, Stay Around A Little Longer was recorded for Guy’s 15th studio album Living Proof from October 2010. In addition, the tune appeared separately as a single just prior to the release of the record, which was produced by Hambridge who also played drums and percussion.

The moving lyrics are a dialogue between King and Guy, who express their gratitude for the life each has had and mutual appreciation. Admittedly, when I watched this clip the other day, I found myself tearing up a bit, especially at King’s line, When I’m pushing up daisies, don’t forget/You’re still my buddy. The soul that comes across in this song and these words is just beautiful – this is music at its finest!

Sources: B.B. King Blues Club & Grill website, Wikipedia, YouTube