Jimi Hendrix’s “Both Sides Of The Sky” Is Fully Released

Last album in trilogy of posthumous records


While I’m not a Jimi Hendrix expert, I don’t detect any no new revelations on Both Sides Of The Sky. In fact, if anything, I’d say it pretty much reflects what I’ve heard from Hendrix before. And that’s quite alright with me. After all, we’re talking about possibly the best rock guitarist who has ever walked the planet. So more of the same really means more of the same brilliance. In my book that’s not a reason to complain. Plus, I have to say, this album also provides a nice occasion to rediscover Hendrix.

The record, which was fully released yesterday (March 9), is the third in a trilogy of posthumous albums after Valleys Of Neptune (2010) and People, Hell and Angels (2013). It captures studio recordings Hendrix made between 1968 and 1970. All three albums were co-produced by Eddie Kramer, Hendrix’s go-to recording engineer for all records that appeared during his lifetime. The full release was preceded by three upfront singles: The Muddy Waters tune Mannish Boy, as well as the Hendrix compositions Hear My Train A Comin’ and Lover Man, which I covered in previous posts.

Here are clips of Mannish Boy, a nice take of the Waters classic, and Lover Man, which Hendrix modeled after B.B. King’s Rock Me Baby.

“He used the studio as a rehearsal place,” Kramer told NPR, commenting on the transitional period for Hendrix this collection from the vault captures. These recordings happened shortly after the final album by The Jimi Hendrix Experience Electric Ladyland had appeared and before he would record his last and only album with Band Of Gypsies at Fillmore East in January 1970. “Thank goodness that was happening because the tape was running, and he would bring in different musicians to try to figure out what he was gonna do with his musical direction.”

These different artists included Stephen Stills, Johnny Winter and saxophonist Lonnie Youngblood, who appear on different tracks of the album. The collaborations with Stills include his original tune $20 Fine and a great pre-Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young  recording of Joni Mitchell’s Woodstock. Winter joins Hendrix on Things I Used To Do, a great electric slide guitar blues. Youngblood provides strong vocals and a killer saxophone solo on Georgia Blues. On that tune, I also dig what sounds like a Hammond in the background – no idea who was playing it. Unfortunately, I couldn’t find YouTube clips for any of these tunes, but the entire album is still available for free streaming on NPR here. It’s also on regular streaming platforms, including Apple Music/iTunes and Spotify.

Eddie Kramer

“Sometimes, a song would take him nine months to bring to completion, and a lot of these songs are that,” Kramer explained during the above NPR interview. “They are the takes prior to it being completed, which makes them very exciting.” The NPR segment further reported that according to Kramer, the Hendrix vault has pretty much been exhausted when it comes to unreleased studio recordings but still includes plenty of additional live material. Some 47 years after Hendrix’s death, one does indeed wonder how much unreleased material could possibly be left.

Asked whether working on Hendrix music is still meaningful to him, Kramer said, “Oh my goodness, yes, I love working on this stuff. I get so excited just putting the tapes up and hearing his voice. I wanna keep doing Jimi Hendrix for the rest of time.”

Sources: Wikipedia, NPR, YouTube

New Jimi Hendrix Album Exclusively Available At NPR For Streaming

Earlier this evening, I saw on Facebook that Both Sides Of The Sky, the forthcoming posthumous album by Jimi Hendrix, is now available exclusively at NPR for streaming. I’m currently listening to the collection of tracks recorded in 1968 and 1969, and definitely like what I’m hearing. The first three tunes, Mannish Boy, Lover Man and Hear My Train A Coming, already were officially released over the past six weeks. I previously wrote about them here, here and here.

Based on what I’ve heard so far, I think the lead to NPR’s accompanying review hits the nail on the head: “At this point, some 47 years after Jimi Hendrix’s death, it’s probably unrealistic to expect that a set of deep-vault studio tracks can expand the guitarist’s legacy in any meaningful way. This no doubt dismays the Hendrix obsessives, who pine for the long-whispered-about radical experiments they believe Hendrix squirreled away in some Electric Ladyland broom closet. For the rest of us, the arrival of any sort of Hendrix material, especially if it’s captured in the studio, is a chance to be awed, all over again and in surprising ways, by this human’s freakish powers of musical persuasion.”

Thus far, my favorite tunes include Mannish Boy, $20 Fine (a Stephen Stills tune with him on vocals), Things I Used To Do (nice slide guitar shredder with Johnny Winter), Georgia Blues (slow blues featuring Lonnie Youngblood on saxophone) and the Joni Mitchell classic Woodstock, another song featuring Stills. While the last track is “missing” the magic vocal harmonies of Crosby, Still, Nash & Young, I still dig this version, which features Hendrix jamming on bass and superb organ work.

Both Sides Of The Sky is set for release on March 9.

Sources: Tom Moon, NPR: First Listen: Jimi Hendrix, ‘Both Sides Of The Sky’

Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers’ New Live Box Set Showcases Band On Top Of Their Game

“San Francisco Serenades” features hits, covers and rarities from 1997 gig at Fillmore

When chatting about music with a dear friend this morning, he asked me whether I had heard of this 3-CD box live set from Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers, which had come out recently. I had not but was immediately intrigued, especially when my friend added it features numerous great covers, including Satisfaction (The Rolling Stones), You Really Got Me (Kinks) and Louie Louie (The Kingsmen).

He had seen it on Amazon. While still on the phone with him, I searched Apple Music/iTunes and came up empty. Then I started searching the Internet for this box set called San Francisco Serenades. The first hit was the enclosed YouTube clip, which based on its length of more than three hours seems to capture the entire thing! Of course, I realize there is a high likelihood the shelf life of this link is limited, but heck, as long as it works, I’m happy to feature it on the blog.

According to the website of Spin CD, a UK music retailer, the box set captures the last show of a 20-date residency at The Fillmore in San Francisco, which the band had there from January 10 to February 7, 1997. Apparently, that gig was recorded live for FM broadcast. In addition to some Petty gems like I Won’t Back Down, American Girl and Free Fallin’, the set predominantly includes cover versions of tunes by Chuck Berry, JJ Cale, The Rolling Stones and other artists. In addition, John Lee Hooker joined the band to perform three of his tunes.

Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers Filmore West 1997

After having listened to the first two hours in a row and sampled the remainder, I have to say I’m really blown away! The fact that the Heartbreakers were a terrific band wasn’t news to me; what I didn’t fully appreciate is how many covers these guys played, and damn, do they sound great! While taking three hours to listen to the entire clip is a significant time commitment, if you are a Petty fan, you should do it!

Following are some highlights of the covers with time stamps: Around And Around (Chuck Berry; 0.00); Call Me The Breeze (JJ Cale; 17:18 – Petty credited Floridian compatriots Lynyrd Skynyrd, which also covered the tune); With John Lee Hooker: I Found My Baby, It Serves You Right To Suffer & Boogie Chillin’; 50:05 – 1:07:07); Green Onions (Booker T. & The M.G.s; 1:19:40); You Really Got Me (The Kinks; 1:53:55); Shakin’ All Over (Johnny Kidd and The Pirates; 2:09:15); Gloria (Them; 2:38:07); (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction (The Rolling Stones; 2:52:38); and It’s All Over Now (The Valentinos; 2:59:35).

Here is the full set list.

Disc: 1
  1. Around And Around 2:48
  2. Jammin’ Me 4:41
  3. Runnin’ Down A Dream 5:05
  4. Time Is On My Side 4:28
  5. Call Me The Breeze 5:54
  6. Cabin Down Below 2:48
  7. Diddy Wah Diddy 3:51
  8. Slaughter On 10th Ave 3:46
  9. Listen To Her Heart 4:10
  10. I Won’t Back Down 3:56
  11. The Date I Had With That Ugly Homecoming Queen 8:10
  12. Find My Baby (featuring John Lee Hooker) 5:03
  13. It Serve You Right To Suffer (featuring John Lee Hooker) 4:21
  14. Boogie Chillun’ (featuring John Lee Hooker) 8:39
Disc: 2
  1. It’s Good To Be King 12:05
  2. Green Onions 4:54
  3. You Are My Sunshine 2:07
  4. Ain’t No Sunshine 3:32
  5. On The Street 3:28
  6. I Want You Back Again 3:37
  7. Little Maggie 3:38
  8. Walls (Circus) 3:45
  9. Angel Dream 2:53
  10. Guitar Boogie Shuffle 3:44
  11. Even The Losers 3:12
  12. American Girl 2:33
  13. You Really Got Me 2:51
  14. County Farm 8:38
  15. You Wreck Me 4:18
Disc: 3
  1. Shakin’ All Over 2:44
  2. Mary Jane’s Last Dance 10:21
  3. You Don’t Know How It Feels 7:08
  4. I Got A Woman 3:00
  5. Free Fallin’ 5:20
  6. Gloria 10:46
  7. Bye Bye Johnny 4:06
  8. Satisfaction 3:02
  9. Louie Louie 3:51
  10. It’s All Over Now 4:54
  11. Alright For Now 3:17


What’s a bit of a mystery is when exactly the box set appeared. Leeway’s Homegrown Music Network, which describes itself as “independent bands, representatives, venues, stores, fans and people like you all working together to improve our world through good music,” indicates February 9, 2018 as the release date. AllMusic notes the box set is available on Amazon with a date of December 1, 2017. Amazon simply indicates 2018 as the release time. I suppose, it matters less when the bloody box set came out than the fact that it is outstanding.

Sources: Spin CD, Leeway’s Homegrown Music Network, AllMusic, YouTube

Clips & Pix: Jimi Hendrix/Hear My Train A Coming

The above clip is the second tune released yesterday (February 15) in advance of Both Sides Of The Sky, a posthumous album by Jimi Hendrix, set to come out March 9. Written by Hendrix and first recorded in London in 1967, Hear My Train A Coming became a staple during Hendrix live shows but didn’t appear on any of his albums until now.

According to a USA Today story, this version of the blues shredder was recorded in New York in April 1969 and was partially inspired by Muddy Waters, one Hendrix’s influences. It is one of the last songs recorded by The Jimi Hendrix Experience, which in addition to Hendrix included bassist Noel Redding and drummer Mitch Michell.

“I love the feeling of being life in the studio ,” commented Eddie Kramer, recording engineer for every Hendrix album during the guitarist’s life, during a video interview posted on the official Hendrix Facebook page. “This is an absolutely right-on performance from Jimi,” added Kramer who co-produced the record with John McDermott and Jimi’s sister and Janie Hendrix, head of the Hendrix estate. See clip below for entire interview.

While this new tune is cool, I think I prefer the previous upfront release of Mannish Boy. The forthcoming record also features various collaborations that sound intriguing, including with Stephen Stills on the Joni Mitchell tune Woodstock, and Johnny Winter on Things I Used to Do, a blues track written and released by New Orleans blues guitarist Guitar Slim in 1953.

Sources: Wikipedia, USA Today, Jimi Hendrix Facebook page, Rolling Stone, YouTube

Simple Minds Release New Studio Album

Scottish band still alive and kicking after 40 years

While I never was a huge fan of Simple Minds, I listened to them in my late teens and early 20s. Waterfront, Alive And Kicking, Belfast Child and Stand By Love are some of the tunes I liked at the time – and do to this day, though it’s fair to say my taste has evolved since then. Still, when saw in Apple Music the Scottish band just released a new studio album, I was intrigued – frankly, I didn’t even know they were still around!

In various ways, Simple Minds have always reminded me a bit of U2. Both bands started out around the same time, i.e., the second half of the ’70s. Both are led by charismatic vocalists. I saw them once in Stuttgart, Germany in the early ’90s; similar to Bono, Jim Kerr was a pretty strong front man. And guitarist Charlie Burchill’s work at times is a bit reminiscent of The Edge. Kerr and Burchill are the only remaining original members of Simple Minds, which were formed in Glasgow, Scotland in 1977.

Simple Minds
Current line-up of Simple Minds (from left to right): Sarah Brown (backing vocals), Cherisse Osei (drums, percussion), Ged Grimes (bass), Jim Kerr (lead vocals), Charlie Burchill (guitar), Gordy Goudie (multi-instrumentalist) and Catherine AD (backing vocals), 

So how about the new album? Titled Walk Between Worlds, it’s the band’s 17th studio record, which was released yesterday (Feb 2). I’ve now listened to it a few times. Not to overdo the comparisons with U2, but there is indeed another similarity I find between this album and the Irish band’s last studio release Songs Of Experience. In an apparent attempt to stay contemporary, both bands combined old and new elements.

While part of me sometimes wishes bands wouldn’t chase the latest trends and stick to their old sound, I respect artists who don’t just want to keep repeating what they’ve done before. After all, had The Beatles used that approach and stuck to their early sound, there never would have been gems like Revolver and Sgt. Pepper.

Commenting on the band’s new (younger) members and change more broadly, Kerr said this to Billboard: “It’s been a bit controversial with some of the social network sites, because people, fans — and where would we be without them — they don’t like it when you change around things too much. But we do change things around and we feel that it’s good to open the door. It’s great to say ’40 years!’ and all that; There’s a lot of strength in that. But there’s a lot of dangers as well — autopilot being one of them, doing the same old same old. You’ve got to open the door and let new opportunities walk in.”

Alright, time to get to some music. First up: Magic, the album’s opener and lead single first released online on January 4, 2018. Co-written by Kerr and Burchill like the majority of songs, the tune is an example of Burchill’s Edge-esque guitar work. It kind of got a catchy chorus. Here’s the tune’s official video clip:

In The Signal And The Noise, another Kerr/Burchill co-write, I can clearly hear some vintage Simple Minds. The sound reminds me of the band’s synthesizer and guitar-driven power pop from the early ’80s. The groove isn’t much different from Don’t You (Forget About Me), though the latter song has a more catchy melody. Like the opener, the track also appeared ahead of the album as its second single.

A sonic standout is Barrowland Star, another Kerr/Burchill co-write. I love Burchill’s fairly aggressive guitar work in a song that is otherwise synth-driven with strings layered on top. Simple Minds’ website calls it “one of the album’s key tracks.” It further points out that the song’s title refers to a popular ballroom in Glasgow, where the band has performed many times. This tune has something!

The last track I’d like to highlight is Sense Of Discovery. The track is credited to Kerr, Burchill and Owen Parker, a London-based composer, multi-instrumentalist and producer. At around 2:40 minutes into the song comes the ultimate throwback to Simple Minds’ ’80s heydays: a melodic fraction borrowed from Alive And Kicking from 1985’s Once Upon A Time, the band’s most successful album. Sense Of Discovery is also the album’s third single, released January 25.

Walk Between Worlds was co-produced by Simple Minds and two experienced producers: Andy Wright and Gavin Goldberg. In addition to working together with Goldberg on Simple Minds’ two previous albums Acoustic (2016) and Big Music (2014), Wright’s previous credits include Simply Red, Jeff Beck and Eurythmics, among others. Goldberg has worked with artists, such as Chrissie Hynde, Neil Young and The Faces (2010 reunion and live album) – cool stuff!

“Records take their own direction and possibilities, and that’s what this was,” Kerr also told Billboard. “We were on such a high after the last one (2014’s Big Music) that we almost went straight into this as soon as the tour ended. With the idea the band was now officially 40 years old, we were praying and hoping that whatever we came out with would sound like it had vitality and energy, a commitment that perhaps belies the 40 years. Really, that’s what it was about, a continuation of the story of music and who we are.”

Simple Minds will go on the road later this month to promote the new album, playing it in its entirety, together with their old hits. The seven-date European tour gets underway on February 13, appropriately at the Barrowland Ballroom in Glasgow, and concludes in Copenhagen, Denmark on February 20. Their website lists plenty of other gigs throughout the UK and many other European countries, starting in May through the first half of September.

Sources: Wikipedia, Billboard, Simple Minds website, Andy Wright website, Gavin Goldberg website, YouTube

Clips & Pix: Jimi Hendrix/Mannish Boy

The above version of Mannish Boy is from an upcoming Jimi Hendrix album called Both Sides Of The Sky, which will appear on March 9. I love the uptempo and funky take of the blues classic credited to Muddy Waters, Mel London and Bo Diddley.

The cool thing is Both Sides Of The Sky is not some ordinary sampler but a compilation of previously unreleased material from Hendrix’s vaults. According to a Rolling Stone story, since the mid-nineties, Hendrix’s key recording engineer Eddie Kramer has worked with the guitar wizard’s estate to unearth previously unreleased tracks.

In addition to Mannish Boy, the 13 studio tracks Hendrix recorded between 1968 and 1970 include intriguing collaborations with Johnny Winter, Stephen Stills and Lonnie Youngblood. This album is the third and last in a trilogy of such unearthed gems. The previous two are Valleys Of Neptune (2010) and People, Hell and Angeles (2013).

Based on how great Mannish Boy sounds, it appears Kramer who was a recording engineer for every Jimi Hendrix album during the guitarist’s lifetime did an outstanding job. He co-produced the new record with John McDermott and Janie Hendrix, Jimi’s sister who also heads Experience Hendrix, the company that manages the estate. Looking forward to that one!

Sources: Rolling Stone, Jimi Hendrix website, YouTube

Bad Company Live At Red Rocks

English rock supergroup’s 2016 live album becomes more broadly available

Paul Rodgers is one of my favorite male rock vocalists. So I was intrigued when a live album from Bad Company popped up under “New Releases” in my Apple Music last week. It turns out that while Live At Red Rocks appeared on iTunes and I assume other online/streaming platforms on January 12, it first went on sale exclusively at Wal-Mart last September.

According to Ultimate Classic Rock, the CD/DVD set captures a May 15 show during the band’s 2016 U.S. tour with Joe Walsh at the breathtaking Red Rocks Amphitheatre close to Denver. A concert review in the Denver Post noted that Walsh opened the night backed by a 10-piece band, telling the audience, “We’ll get you sweaty and Bad Company will finish you off.” This must have been one hell of a show!

Red Rocks Amphitheatre
Red Rocks Amphitheatre, Morrison, Col.

Rochester, N.Y. classic rock radio station WCMF 96.5 FM noted that while co-founder and ex-Mott The Hoople guitarist Mick Ralphs is credited on the recording, he was no longer part of the band’s lineup due to health issues. Rich Robinson of The Black Crows stood in for him. Also on guitar was touring musician Howard Leese, formerly with Heart, who has played with the Paul Rodgers Band and Bad Company since 2008. According to Wikipedia, the band’s current lineup also includes Simon Kirke (drums), another co-founding member who played with Rodgers in Free; and Todd Ronning (bass).

Time to get to some music. Feel Like Makin’ Love is one of Bad Company’s best known songs. Co-written by Rodgers and Ralphs, the tune is included on the band’s second studio album Straight Shooter, which appeared in April 1975. It was also released separately as a single in August that year. Here’s a fairly decent video clip.

Burnin’ Sky is the title track from the band’s fourth studio record from March 1977. It was written by Rodgers and also came out separately as the album’s second single.

Seagull is one of the acoustic tracks of the set. Another Rodgers/Ralphs co-write, it is the closer to Bad Company’s eponymous studio album, which appeared in June 1974. During this live performance, Kirke joined Rodgers, Leese and Robinson on acoustic guitar and threw in a nice solo. Here’s a great video clip.

Rock ‘n’ Roll Fantasy, another Bad Company classic, is from Desolation Angels, the band’s fifth studio album released in March 1979. The tune, which was written by Rodgers, also was the record’s lead single.

The last track I’d like to highlight is Bad Company, the title track of the band’s eponymous debut record. Co-written by Rodgers and Kirke, the song also became the album’s third single. Here’s a great video clip.

Rodgers’ website currently lists four dates for 2018. One solo show is coming up this Saturday, January 20 in Bensalem, Pa. The remaining dates are Bad Company gigs: two in Florida in mid-February, and one in Punta Cana, Dominican Republic at the end of April. The last show sounds like an attractive proposition to me, especially with an outside temperature of 19F as I’m writing this!

Sources: Ultimate Classic Rock, Denver Post, WCMF 96.5 FM, Paul Rodgers website, Wikipedia, YouTube