Keb’ Mo’ Releases Roots-Oriented Album Oklahoma

Keb’ Mo’ fully entered my radar screen only two years ago with TajMo, a collaboration album with Taj Mahal and one of my favorite new records from 2017. My fondness for Mo’ grew further when I saw him together with Mahal during the TajMo supporting tour, one of the greatest shows I’ve been to in recent years. Perhaps not surprisingly, I was full of anticipation about Mo’s new album Oklahoma, which appeared yesterday. Let me say this right upfront: It’s very different from TajMo, but after having listened to the 10 tracks for a few times, I like it and with every additional run-through, I like it even better.

Typically, the Nashville-based guitarist and singer-songwriter whose real name is Kevin Roosevelt Moore, is characterized as a blues artist. But based on my understanding, Mo’ has frequently ventured beyond the blues into other styles like R&B, Americana and roots music. While Oklahoma has some bluesy moments, it primarily falls into the Americana/roots genre.

Keb' Mo' & Dara Tucker
Dara Tucker & Keb’ Mo’

According to Mo’s website, the inspiration for the album’s title track came to Mo’ after he had visited the state for a benefit show in the aftermath of a tornado and seen all the destruction. But it wasn’t until he met American vocalist and Oklahoma native Dara Tucker that the idea of making an album focused on The Sooner State was born. As Mo’s website puts its, Together, they set about to portray the complicated depth of American history played out in her home state. Native American connection and tragedy, natural and man made disasters, incredible musicians and the Tulsa Sound, and western ruggedness and fortitude are all themes.

Initially, Mo’ had set out to make an acoustic solo album, and it wasn’t supposed to be called Oklahoma. “I just wanted some good songs, like I always do—I wanted 10 really good, authentic songs,” Mo told Blues Rock Review. “I had this idea about Oklahoma, and I was like, ‘Oh god, Oklahoma—that’s just crazy. That has nothing to do with me.’ I had a writing session with a writer I’d never written with, Dara Tucker. I said, ‘Where are you from?’ She says, “Oklahoma.” I go, ‘Okay—there might be something with this Oklahoma idea. Let’s just write this idea; I don’t know what’s going to come of it.'”

Well, let’s find out! Here’s the title track co-written by Mo’ and Tucker. The tune features great lap steel guitar playing by Robert Randolph.

Put A Woman In Charge features singer-songwriter Rosanne Cash, the eldest daughter of Johnny Cash and his first wife Vivian Liberto Cash. The track was co-written by Mo’, John Lewis Parker and Beth Nielsen Chapman. “That was supposed to be a stand-alone single, but I loved the way it turned out, so I had to put it on the album,” Mo’ noted on his website. “I’d never worked with Rosanne before, but somebody suggested that she might like it. She said yes, and she put down her part, and it was just so badass.” The message of the groovy tune is pretty clear. Here’s an excerpt of the lyrics.

Way back when/In the beginning of time/Man made the fire then the wheel/Went from a horse to an automobile

He said “the world is mine”/He took the oceans and the sky/He set the borders – build the walls/He won’t stop till he owns it all

And here we are/Standing on the brink of disaster/Enough is enough is enough is enough/I know the answer

Put a woman in charge/Put a woman in charge/Put a woman in charge/Put a woman in charge…

Since I previously wrote about This Is My Home, one of my favorite tunes on Oklahoma, I’m skipping it here and jump right to Don’t Throw It Away. Co-written by Mo, Charles Esten and Colin Linden, Mo’s friend and the album’s primary producer, with Mo’ co-producing, the bluesy tune about the virtues of recycling features Taj Mahal and is the closest it gets to TajMo.

The last track I’d like to highlight is Ridin’ On A Train, another bluesy tune co-written by Mo’ and Jenny Yates. The song only features Mo’ on vocals and resonator guitar and drummer Marcus Finnie.

Commenting on the album overall on his website, Mo’ said, “I’m more interested in pleasing myself, and making records that make me feel proud and make me feel like I’ve done my best. And if other people like it, that’s gravy.” He further pointed out, “When you are in a certain part of your life, the concept of an album is woven into the process. All of these songs stemmed from important issues and topics worldwide that really resonated with me during the time we were recording the project.”

Oklahoma appears on Concord Records. Mo’ dedicated the album to his late mother, Lauvella Cole, who passed away in September 2018 at the age of 91. Mo’ is currently on the road to support the record. After finishing a U.S. leg, he is headed overseas at the end of the month for a series of dates in Europe, lasting well into the second half July, before returning to the U.S. in late August after taking a break. The full schedule is on his website.

Sources: Wikipedia, Keb’ Mo’ website, Blues Rock Review, Glide Magazine, YouTube

 

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Pix and Clips: Keb’ Mo’/This Is My Home

I just spotted this beautiful tune and clip by Keb’ Mo’. Since his fantastic collaboration album with Taj Mahal TajMo and seeing the two artists in August 2017 during the tour that supported the record, I’ve come to dig Mo’.

Co-written by Mo’ and John Lewis Parker, This Is My Home is from Mo’s upcoming new album Oklahoma, which is set for release on June 14. “This Is My Home is a love story about people making their way in a changing world,” Mo’ commented. “Immigrant, enslaved or native, we all have a story and a history.”

To me, the lyrics go to the heart and soul of what America has traditionally stood for. Nowadays, unfortunately, this philosophy seems to be in danger. But in countries that have free elections, it’s up to the people to decide what kind of leaders and country they want to have.

Lupe came here from Mexico
About 3 or 4 years go
And the journey, the journey, the journey was long
She got a job at a local factory
Sent money back home to her family
She said, “This is where I belong
This is my home
This is where I belong”

A man arrives from Pakistan
A stranger in the promised land
Mohammed, Mohammed was finally free
He drove day and night in a taxi cab
When people got mean
He didn’t get mad
He knew, this is where I belong
This is my home
This is where I belong

La la la la la la…

Lupe had school on Monday night
When a man walked in who looked just right
Mohammed and Lupe were falling in love
Well they raised a beautiful family
Taught them all their history
They know, this is where they belong
This is their home
This is where they belong

My people came over from Africa
To North and South America
And the journey, the journey, the journey was long
They sacrificed and they paid the price
So I could live this wonderful life
And I know, this is where I belong
This is my home
This is where I belong

La la la la la la…

This is where I belong
This is my home
This is where I belong

Sources: Facebook, YouTube

What I’ve Been Listening To: Bonnie Raitt/Slipstream

I think Slipstream is one of the gems in Bonnie Raitt’s close to 40-year recording career. I hadn’t heard the album in a while until this morning. Afterwards, I spontaneously decided to cover it.

Raitt is one of my favorite music artists, and I’ve written about her before. If you’re curious about her background, you can read more here. In this post, I’d like to focus on the music from Slipstream, Raitt’s 16th studio album released in April 2012. It came seven years after the predecessor Souls Alike, the last album for her longtime record company Capitol Records. The album is the first issued on her independent label Redwing Records, which she launched in 2011.

Slipstream kicks off strongly with the groovy Used To Rule A World. The tune also became one of two tracks that appeared separately as a single. It was written by singer-songwriter and session multi-instrumentalist Randall Bramblett. In addition to Raitt, he has played with the likes of Gregg Allman, Robbie Robertson and Steve Winwood. Apart from Raitt’s funky guitar, I particularly dig the Hammond B3 part performed by Mike Finnegan. He’s another session musician with an impressive resume, including Jimi Hendrix, Joe Cocker, Buddy Guy, Etta James and Crosby, Stills and Nash, to name some.

Right Down The Line, the second single off the album, is a nice cover of a tune by Gerry Rafferty. The Scottish singer-songwriter included it on his sophomore album City To City from January 1978. That record is best known for the mega hit Baker Street, which makes me want to listen to the song and other music from Rafferty. I haven’t done that in a long time either – could become a separate blog topic in the future!

Down To You is another tune for which Bramblett got a credit. The other co-writers are George Marinelli, who also plays guitar, as well as Raitt who wrote the lyrics – her only credit on the album. But if you interpret songs, sing and play slide guitar like Raitt, I think it becomes a minor detail whether or not you actually write the songs. Marinelli, a founding member of Bruce Hornsby and The Range, has been part of Raitt’s band since 1993.

Raitt slows things down on Not Cause I Wanted To, a ballad about the breakup of a relationship. I wonder whether the tune, which was co-written by Al Anderson and Bonnie Bishop, has some autobiographic connection. According to Wikipedia, Raitt’s marriage to actor Michael O’Keefe ended in divorce in late 1999, apparently because their careers caused them to spend much time apart.

The last tune I’d like to call out is Standing In The Doorway, another track on the quieter side. It was written by Bob Dylan, who included it on this 30th studio album Time Out Of Mind from September 1997. Interestingly, Slipstream also features another Dylan cover from the same record, Million Miles. When covering songs, Raitt oftentimes makes them her own, but in this case, she chose to stay closely to the original – in any case, a beautiful take!

Slipstream entered the Billboard 200 at no. 6, making it Raitt’s highest-charting album in the U.S. in 18 years since 1994’s chart-topper Longing In Their Hearts. She also won Best Americana Album for Slipstream at the 2013 Grammy Awards.

Sources: Wikipedia, Bonnie Raitt website, YouTube

John Mellencamp Announces New Studio Album And Releases First Track

“Other People’s Stuff” features covers mostly drawing from Great American Songbook

This is exciting news, at least from my perspective – John Mellencamp, one of my favorite artists for more than 30 years, has announced his 24th studio album, Other People’s Stuff, which is scheduled for release on December 7th. The collection features ten covers “culled from seminal albums, compilations, unearthed sessions and documentaries.” The announcement coincided with the release of the first track from the album, Eyes On The Prize.

Mellencamp originally performed Eyes On The Prize, a traditional, during a 2010 Celebration of Music from the Civil Rights Movement event at The White House. The nice bluesy tune is delivered with Mellencamp’s rough voice he has developed over the decades – undoubtedly in good part a result of his chain-smoking habit. BTW, that hot slide guitar is played by roots and country blues artist The Reverend J. Peyton. Check it out!

Here’s a clip of Mellencamp’s original performance at the above The White House event. Looking at the current situation of the country, it’s hard to believe how different times were back then.

“Most, if not all, of the songs on Other People’s Stuff come from The Great American Songbook,” Mellencamp commented. “These are songs that have been recorded over the last 40 years of my career, but had never been put together as one piece of work. Now, they have.”

Here is the track list of the album, which appears on Public Records:

1. “To The River” (originally from 1993’s Human Wheels)
2. “Gambling Bar Room Blues” (originally from 1997’s The Songs of Jimmie Rodgers – A Tribute)
3. “Teardrops Will Fall” (originally from 2003’s Trouble No More)
4. “In My Time of Dying” (originally from 1997’s Rough Harvest)
5. “Mobile Blue” (originally from 2017’s Sad Clowns & Hillbillies)
6. “Eyes on the Prize” (originally performed at The White House in 2010)
7. “Dark As A Dungeon (originally from the 2017 National Geographic Channel documentary From the Ashes)
8. “Stones in My Passway” (originally from 2003’s Trouble No More)
9. “Wreck of the Old 97” (originally from 2004’s The Rose and The Briar)
10. “I Don’t Know Why I Love You” (originally from 2003’s An Interpretation of Stevie Wonder’s Songs)

John Mellencamp will support the album with a 2019 tour. The John Mellencamp Show,  which currently has 40 dates, will kick off on February 7 in South Bend, Ind. The last scheduled gig at this time is in Albuquerque, N.M. at the end of April. Some of the other dates include Cincinnati (Feb 10), Baltimore, Md. (Feb 20), New York (Feb 25, 26 & 27), Kansas City, Mo. (Mar 14), Orlando, Fla. (Mar 24), Wichita, Kan. (Apr 16) and Portland, Ore. (Apr 23).

The concerts in New York are at the beautiful The Beacon Theatre and surely would be a great treat. But Mellencamp is going to be even closer to my house at New Jersey State Theatre in New Brunswick, N.J. (Feb 23), which is also a lovely venue – very tempting!

Sources: John Mellencamp website; YouTube

Cordovas Release New Album That Santa Fe Channel

Harmony vocals and warm guitar-driven sound feel like trip back to late ’60s and early ’70s

Until a few weeks ago, I hadn’t heard of Cordovas. Then I saw the Americana rock band from East Nashville, Tenn. in a free summer concert in the park in Woodbridge, N.J. and immediately liked what I heard. Frankly, I’m still a bit in disbelief they played there in the first place but, hey, that’s how they got on my radar screen, so I’m not complaining! Today, they released what I understand is their second studio album, That Santa Fe Channel, and it’s a real beauty.

Listening to Cordovas feels a bit like taking a journey back in time to the late ’60s and early ’70s, a period in music I love. Sometimes, my dear wife tells me I grew up during the wrong decade – she may be right about it!:-) Anyway, Cordovas’ beautiful triple-stacked harmony vocals and guitar-driven sound remind me of bands like Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, The Band, Grateful Dead, Eagles and Little Feat.

Billboard called Cordovas’ music a blend of Southern and California Americana. Rolling Stone, in a June 2017 feature titled 10 New Country Artists You Need To Know, described their sound as “decidedly American” and “caught halfway between Duane Allman’s Telecaster twang, the Dead’s hazy harmonies and the stoned swoon of California’s folk-rock heyday.”

I could never come up with such clever attributes, which is why I probably wouldn’t get far as a music journalist. But while I may be challenged to find the right buzz words, given my former band days as a bassist (admittedly many moons ago!) and close to four decades of listening experience, I feel confident enough to say that This Santa Fe Channel is great music, since I know it when I hear it! Of course, ultimately, it comes down to individual taste.

Cordovas
Cordovas (left to right): (left to right) Toby Weaver, Graham Spillman, Lucca Soria, Sevans Henderson and Joe Firstman

Led by bassist Joe Firstman, Cordovas have been around for some time. According to Billboard, the first album released under their name appeared in 2011 and essentially was a solo effort by Firstman. Firstman has a long history predating the band, which includes a 2002 solo debut album, War Of Women, and a stint as music director on Last Call with Carson Daly. “For this one [the new album] we had the idea to make it a band and go forward to do it,” he told Billboard. “I saw the weaknesses in that first (solo) process and I recognized that I felt like I was much stronger in the band, with guys that I really trust and are like-minded individuals. I wanted to build something that would last.”

The band’s current line-up, which also includes Toby Weaver (guitar, vocals), Lucca Soria (guitar, vocals), Sevans Henderson (keyboards) and Graham Spillman (drums), has been together for five years. Cordovas are exceptionally tight-knit. Not only are they band mates who tour prolifically, but they also live together in the same compound in East Nashville. “The Cordovas are a 24-hour, 7-days-a-week job,” explains Firstman on the band’s Facebook page. “We’re eating dinner together, hanging out together, and making art. We don’t have rehearsal times, because rehearsal is always. You have to honor the art first, and everything else comes second.” I think it’s fair to say these conditions wouldn’t work for most bands, so kudos to Cordovas for their extraordinary commitment. Time to let some music do the talking, or perhaps I should better say the writing!

Here’s the album’s opener This Town’s A Drag. This tune nicely sets the tone for the record: Great harmony singing and a warm sound blending electric and pedal steel guitar.

Selfish Loner is the longest track on the album, clocking in at just over four and a half minutes. Most tunes are only around three minutes or less. In fact, the nine songs on the album only total about 29 minutes altogether.

Here’s Frozen Rose, one of two tunes Cordovas had released as a single ahead of the album.

The last tune I’d like to highlight is Standin’ On The Porch, which in addition to country rock throws in some blues. I also dig the tune’s groove.

That Santa Fe Channel was produced by Kenneth Pattengale, a singer and guitarist in American indie folk duo The Milk Carton Kids. The album appears on ATO Records, an independent New York-based label founded in 2000 by Dave Matthews and manager Coran Capshaw. Among others, their roster includes Alabama Shakes.

Cordovas are currently where they appear to be most of the time – on the road. Their present U.S. schedule posted on their website goes until early October. Upcoming gigs include Chicago (Aug 16), Washington, D.C. (Aug 23), Fort Worth (Aug 30) and Cleveland (Sep 5). Earlier this year, the band toured in Europe.

Sources: Billboard, Rolling Stones, Cordovas Facebook page and website, ATO Records website, YouTube

Cordovas, Seductive Americana Rock From Nashville

Last year, Rolling Stone included them as one of “10 new country artists you need to know.” Now, Cordovas are about to release their studio debut on ATO Records

It’s simply amazing what kind of bands you sometimes encounter when going to free summer-concert-in-the-park events, at least in my neck of the woods. Until yesterday, I had never heard of Americana/country rock band Cordovas. Since it was a beautiful summer evening and – big shocker – I enjoy seeing live music, I decided to go to Parker Press Park in Woodbridge, N.J. I’m glad I did!

While this central Jersey town may not exactly be a metropolis, they surely have an impressive summer concert series. Between late June and mid-September, there are frequent concerts each day of the week except for Saturdays. Most days even have a dedicated theme: Mondays are oldies, on Tuesdays they have tribute bands, and on Fridays it’s jazz. As the “king of tribute bands,” my eyes lightened up when I saw their Tuesday theme, so chances are I’ll be back! Anyway, Wednesdays appear to be reserved for artists playing original music. And last night, it was Cordovas.

So who the hell are Cordovas? A five-piece band hailing from Nashville, Tenn. While it’s not entirely clear to me when they were founded, these guys definitely are no beginners, and this isn’t their first trip to the rodeo! Pictured above, the band’s members include (left to right) Toby Weaver (guitar, vocals), Graham Spillman (drums), Lucca Soria (guitar, vocals), Sevans Henderson (keyboards) and Joe Firstman (bass, vocals).

Cordovas’ music features impressive triple harmony vocals and nice double-lead guitar lines. When Rolling Stone described them in the above story, they dropped names like Grateful Dead, Little Feat and The Allman Brothers Band. I could definitely hear some influences from all of these mighty bands last night. Some others that come to mind are CSNY, The Band and early-phase Eagles.

The band’s set included a mix of covers and original tunes. Following is a clip I recorded – frankly, not sure whether that’s one of their own compositions or a cover. In any case, it gives you a nice flavor of the band’s style.

Here’s a second clip featuring the two guitarists performing a nice version of Robert Johnson’s Sweet Home Chicago, while the rest of the band took a short break. Blues just never gets boring!

According to a May 6 announcement, Cordovas are set for their debut album on ATO Records for August 10. Based on the band’s website, this record doesn’t appear to be their first. The merchandise section lists their eponymous album on vinyl, adding it is out of stock. One can still get it on Amazon. Apparently, it’s from 2017 and weirdly listed as an import.

Anyway, speaking of the new album, two tunes already are out. Here’s a clip of opener This Town’s A Drag – more great harmony singing and a great Telecaster twang!

And here’s the second track: Frozen Rose. Does this sound great or what?!

I’ll be surely to keep Cordovas on my radar screen. BTW, the band has a busy performance schedule. They just returned to the U.S. from a European tour that had started in early June. Between now and the end of September, they have some 20 domestic dates lined up at what appear to be smaller venues. Some of their upcoming gigs are in Boston (Jul 20), New York (Jul 30), Chicago (Aug 16), Washington (Aug 23) and Cleveland (Sep 5). Frankly, while I never mind a free show, I’d pay money to see these guys!

Sources: Cordovas Facebook page and official website, Rolling Stone, YouTube

Gov’t Mule Rule With Powerful Pink Floyd Set

Southern jam rockers and Avett Brothers bring their summer tour to central NJ

When I told a good friend from Germany the other day that I was going to see Gov’t Mule for a Dark Side Of The Mule show, he had the same initial reaction I had a few weeks ago: What’s a southern rock band got to with Pink Floyd? And why would such distinguished musicians with plenty of own material devote an entire gig to the British psychedelic rockers? Well, because not only does Mule dig great music, but they also like to celebrate it during their own shows. In fact, they always have done so since they were founded in late 1994, though thus far, Pink Floyd is the only band to whom they dedicated an entire show.

As I previously wrote, Mule first introduced the concept in 2008 in Boston when they added a second set to their set of original tunes, which solely consisted of Floyd covers. They repeated it at the Mountain Jam music festival in 2015. And now the band is doing this dedicated show for the third time during a short co-headlining summer tour with The Avett Brothers – something I didn’t want to miss as a huge Pink Floyd fan, especially since one of gigs was happening right in my neck of the woods at PNC Bank Arts Center in Holmdel, N.J. last night. Based on Mule’s corresponding live album, my expectations were high – and boy did they deliver!

The Magpie Salute

But first things first. The evening was opened by American rock band The Magpie Salute, which was formed in October 2016 by guitarist Rich Robinson, a co-founding member of The Black Crowes. He pretty much co-wrote all of their songs with his brother and lead vocalist Chris Robinson. I didn’t know any of the band’s songs but liked what I heard. Their remaining current lineup includes two other former Black Crows members, Marc Ford (lead guitar, vocals) and Sven Pipien (bass, backing vocals), as well as John Hogg (vocals, percussion), Matt Slocum (keyboards) and Joe Magistro (drums). The Magpie Salute currently have one live album out from 2017 and are set to release their studio debut High Water I on August 18, 2018. I’ll definitely keep that on my radar screen.

The Avett Brothers
The Avett Brothers: (from left to right) Bob Crowford, Joe Kwon, Scott Avett and Seth Avett

Next came The Avett Brothers, a band that except for its name I hadn’t known. To get a sense of what to expect, I checked setlist.fm for the first date of the tour. It didn’t help much, since they made many changes to their set last night! The band’s core members include brothers and multi-instrumentalists Seth (vocals, guitar, etc.) and Scott Avett (vocals, banjo, etc.), Bob Crawford (double bass, bass, etc.) and Joe Kwon (backing vocals, cello, piano, etc.). The current touring lineup is complemented by Mike Marsh (drums) and Tania Elizabeth (violin, vocals, kazoo).

The origins of The Avett Brothers date back to the late 1990s when Seth’s high school band Margo combined with Scott’s college rock outfit Nemo. After Nemo had released three albums, Seth and Scott started The Avett Brothers as a side project, playing acoustic music with some friends. Eventually, this resulted in the release of an EP, The Avett Bros., in 2000. Their fist full-fledged studio album Country Was appeared in 2002. To date, the band has released eight additional studio records, three additional EPs and four live albums. I was impressed with the craftsmanship and warmth they used to deliver their music, which blends folk, bluegrass, Americana and indie rock. I didn’t record any video, but here’s a YouTube clip of a tune they did last night: Down With The Shine, from The Carpenter, their seventh studio album released in September 2012.

And then it was time for Mule to rule, and boy they certainly did! While like The Avett Brothers they mixed things up compared to the tour’s opening night, they kept the same format.

Gov't Mule 2018
Gov’t Mule (left to right): Danny Louis (keyboards), Matt Abts (drums), Jorgen Carlsson (bass) and Warren Haynes (guitar)

After kicking off their set with two original songs, it was on to mighty Pink Floyd. Last night, the original tunes included Thorazine Shuffle and Banks Of The Deep End, from the Dose (February 1998) and The Deep End, Vol. 1 (October 2001) studio albums, respectively. Here’s Thorazine Shuffle, a co-write by Mule co-founding members Warren Haynes and Matt Abts.

Following their two original songs, Mule launched into a transitional instrumental that blended into One Of These Days, from Meddle. Floyd’s sixth studio album from October 1971 happens to be one of my favorites. All for a sudden, it felt like the band had kicked up the intensity by a few notches. The song’s bass line came across like a furious jack hammer – since I didn’t anticipate it and didn’t want to start recording after it had started, unfortunately, I missed capturing that one.

After this powerful rendition of the first Pink Floyd tune of the night, Mule kept their foot on the gas. Next came Echoes, another gem from Meddle and perhaps my all-time favorite Floyd track. Again I didn’t record that one, figuring if my arms wouldn’t fall off holding my smartphone, the device would probably run low on battery power, given the length of the tune! Next it was on to a series of songs from Dark Side Of The Moon, my favorite Floyd album released in March 1973. Here’s The Great Gig In The Sky, featuring Mule’s outstanding backing vocalists

In addition to Dark Side Of Moon and Meddle, Mule also heavily drew from Wish You Were Here, another Floyd gem and the follow-on to Dark Side, which came out in September 1975. Here’s Welcome To The Machine.

Before playing some additional tunes from the Dark Side and Wish You Were Here albums, Mule threw in Nile Song from More, Floyd’s first soundtrack and their third studio release from June 1969. Then it was time for the cash register to ring with Money, another track from Dark Side. Again, I thought the band did a great job with the tune, especially the saxophonist who killed it!

The epic Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Parts I-V) rounded out Mule’s regular set. Like on the Dark Side Of The Mule album that I previously reviewed here, this was the track where the band took the most artistic freedom, especially Haynes on lead guitar. And just like on that record, I thought he did a nice job, so the deviations didn’t bother me at all. No Pink Floyd show would be complete without Wish You Were, which the band threw in as the encore.

As mentioned at the outset, I thought Mule’s show last night was outstanding. But, as I also noted before, Dark Side Of The Mule is not a note-by-note rendition of Floyd’s music. I imagine not all hard core Floyd fans may like the artistic freedom Mule occasionally takes. As a former hobby musician, I can fully appreciate that artists want to add a little bit of their own flavor when playing covers. If you feel the same and dig Pink Floyd, this show is for you, if you live in the right corners of the country. There are only four remaining dates: Xfinity Center, Mansfield, Mass. (today, Jul 14); Ruoff Home Mortgage Music Center, Noblesville, Ind. (Aug 23); Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre, Tinley Park, IL (Aug 24); and DTE Energy Music Theatre, Clarkston, MI (Aug 25). But there is always hope for additional dates, though Mule’s summer 2018 tour schedule looks dense through the second half of September.

Sources: Wikipedia, setlist.fm, Mule official website, YouTube