Clips & Pix: Bob Marley/Iron Lion Zion

I’ve loved this Bob Marley song from the first time I heard it, which must have been around September 1992, when it was first released posthumously. According to Wikipedia, Marley originally recorded the track in April 1973 or 1974.

Sources: Wikipedia, YouTube

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What I’ve Been Listening to: Bob Marley & the Wailers/Babylon By Bus

This 1978 gem is one big reggae party, from the first to the last track

Babylon By Bus was my first deeper introduction to Bob Marley in ca. 1979/1980. I borrowed the album from my best friend shortly after he had gotten it on vinyl. This was still pre-CD days. I was immediately drawn in by the music’s amazing groove and the record’s party mood that invites you to get off your chair and move!

Released on November 10, 1978, Babylon By Bus was the second live album from Bob Marley & the Wailers and their 12th release overall. By that time, Marley already had been making music for some 13 years. But broad international success had not started until 1977, when Marley and the band released their ninth studio album Exodus. This came on the heels of Marley seeking exile in London after he had survived an assassination attempt on his life in Jamaica.

Babylon By Bus is believed to capture performances from three shows recorded at the Pavillon de Paris in France from June 25-27, 1978 during Marley’s Kaya Tour, which included the U.S. and Europe. The album kicks off with Positive Vibration from the 1976 studio album Rastaman Vibration, which became Marley’s first release to crack the top 10 on the Billboard 200, peaking at no. 8.

I could literally call out every other song on Babylon By Bus as well, since each tune is incredibly powerful. Obviously, that would not be practical, so the following selection is somewhat arbitrary. First up is Exodus, the title track from the above mentioned studio album.

The next tune I’d like to highlight is Stir It Up, one of Marley’s early songs he composed in 1967. It was first released as a single that year and later also included on Catch a Fire, the fifth studio album from Marley & the Wailers released in 1973.

Is This Love is another song I’d like to call out. It has always been one of my favorite Marley tunes, especially the live version on Babylon By Bus. It is faster than the studio recording, which I’ve always felt is how the song was meant to be played. The studio version appeared on Kaya, the 10th studio album from Marley & the Wailers, which was released in March 1978. The speed of the version on the following clip is somewhere in-between the studio recording and Babylon By Bus.

The final tune I’d like to note is Jamming, the album’s closer. The track originally appeared on the above mentioned studio album Exodus. It was also released as a single. Stevie Wonder used it as inspiration for Master Blaster (Jammin’), his tribute to Marley with whom he had performed live in the fall of 1980. It must have been one of Marley’s last live appearances prior to his premature death from metastasized cancer in May 1981.

Not only is Babylon By Bus my favorite Bob Marley album, but I would also consider it as one of the best live albums I’ve heard. It remains just as vibrant today, almost 40 years after its release, a great testament to an exceptional artist.

Sources: Wikipedia, YouTube

On This Day in Rock & Roll History: June 3

1964: Ahead of their upcoming world tour, The Beatles met for a recording session at Abbey Road’s Studio Two, according to the Beatles Bible. The session, which lasted from 5:30 to 9:00 PM, started with George Harrison recording a demo of You Know What to Do, a tune that would remain unreleased until 1995’s Anthology 1. Moreover, The Beatles recorded a demo of John Lennon’s No Reply, which was included on Beatles For Sale, the band’s fourth studio album. The Fab Four also made the last recordings for A Hard Day’s Night, the film soundtrack and their third studio album, taping some overdubs for Lennon’s Any Time At All and Paul McCartney’s Things We Said Today.

1967: Aretha Franklin hit no. 1 on the U.S. singles chart with Respect, which would become one of her signature songs. The tune was written and originally released by Otis Redding in 1965. Franklin’s version became an anthem of the feminist movement and earned her two Grammy Awards in 1968 for “Best Rhythm & Blues Recording” and “Best Rhythm & Blues Solo Vocal Performance, Female.” The track was also included in the soundtrack for Blues Brothers 2000, the sequel to the iconic 1980 motion picture featuring Dan Aykroyd and John Belushi as “Joliet” Jake and Elwood Blues, respectively. That movie featured another great Aretha Franklin song, Think.

1970: Deep Purple released their fourth studio album, Deep Purple in Rock. It was the first record to feature the band’s classic Mark II line-up of Ritchie Blackmore (guitar), Jon Lord (keyboards), Ian Paice (drums, percussion), Ian Gillan (lead vocals) and Roger Glover (bass). The album includes classics, such as Speed King and Child in Time. Black Night, another Deep Purple gem, was recorded at the same time but not included on the album. Instead, it was released separately as a single. While Deep Purple in Rock was the band’s breakthrough album in Europe, climbing to no. 1 on the German album chart and reaching no. 4 in the U.K., success in the U.S. was more moderate with a no. 143 placement on the Billboard 200.

1977: Bob Marley & Wailers released Exodus, their ninth studio album. In addition to the title song, the record includes some of Marley’s greatest reggae classics like Jamming and One Love/People Get Ready. Recorded in London after Marley’s departure from Jamaica in the wake of an assassination attempt, Exodus finally brought this exceptional artist the wide international recognition he so much deserved. The record peaked at no. 8 on the U.K. Albums Chart and at no. 20 on the U.S. Billboard 200. The album earned gold certifications in the U.S., U.K. and Canada.

Sources: The Beatles Bible, This Day in Music.com, Wikipedia, YouTube