If I Could Only Take One

My desert island song by The Velvet Underground

Happy Wednesday and welcome to another installment of my desert island song challenge. Before I can head out to the imaginary island in the sun, I need to pick one song to take with me.

In case you’re new to this weekly feature, there are a few additional rules that guide my picks. The tune must be by an artist or band I’ve only rarely written about or not covered at all. And I’m doing the song selections in alphabetical order. This means the band’s or artist’s name (last name) must start with a specific letter, which this week is “v”.

Frankly, even after doing a bit of research, I only found a handful of bands and music artists whose names start with “v”: Van Halen; Steven Van Zandt, aka Little Steven; Vangelis and The Velvet Underground. Of course, there’s also the great former Lynyrd Skynyrd lead vocalist Ronnie Van Zant, but I’m not aware of any solo music that appeared under his name.

Applying my criteria, it came down to Vangelis or The Velvet Underground. And my pick is Sunday Morning by The Velvet Underground. While I’ve only heard a handful of the band’s tunes and as such, it was a bit of a tricky decision, I’m quite happy with my choice!

Penned by Lou Reed, the band’s lead guitarist, vocalist and main songwriter, Sunday Morning was the opener of their debut album The Velvet Underground & Nico, which appeared in March 1967. It featured German vocalist Nico (born Christa Päffgen) on three tracks, at the insistence of their manager Andy Warhol who co-produced the album with Tom Wilson. Earlier in the ’60s, Wilson had produced three of Bob Dylan’s albums as well as the debut by Simon & Garfunkel.

The Velvet Underground were formed in 1964 in New York City. By the time they recorded their above-mentioned debut, their line-up included co-founders Lou Rood (vocal, guitar, piano), John Cale (viola, bass, keyboards, vocals) and Sterling Morrison (guitar, bass, backing vocals), along with Moe Tucker (drums) who had replaced the band’s original percussionist Angus MacLise in late 1965.

By the early 1970s, Doug Yule who had joined The Velvet Underground in 1968 to replace John Cale, was the group’s only remaining member. While there was one more album released under The Velvet Underground name (Squeeze, February 1973), essentially it was a Yule solo album he recorded together with a few backing musicians. Yule subsequently did some session and touring work for Lou Reed who had left the band in 1970 to launch a solo career.

In 1992, The Velvet Underground reunited for a European tour featuring Reed, Cale, Morrison and Tucker. But it was short-lived and a discussed U.S. tour didn’t materialize when Cale and Reed fell out again – the old story of egos in rock & roll! In August 1995, Morrison passed away from non-Hodgkin lymphoma at the age of 53. Reed, Tucker and Cale reformed the group one last time in 1996 when they were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Reed died from liver disease in October 2013. He was 71. In 2017, Cale and Tucker came together at the Grammy Salute to Music Legends concert for a performance of I’m Waiting for the Man, a tune from The Velvet Underground’s first album. They remain the only survivors of the group’s original line-up.

Following are some additional tidbits on Sunday Morning from Songfacts:

Lou Reed wrote this on a Sunday morning around 6 a.m. Andy Warhol, who helped finance the album, suggested he write a song about the paranoia associated with the effects of a drug wearing off.

Reed wrote this for Nico but then decided not to let the German ex-model sing it. Instead he impersonated her himself.

The production on this song is more lavish than the other tracks on the album. It was intended for release as a single and they wanted to make it radio friendly...

…This song is all about last-minute changes. The inclusion of the track on their first album was literally penciled in, Reed decided to take over vocals at the last minute as they walked into the studio to record it, and John Cale noticed a celesta in the studio and decided to include the instrument for the song on the spot. Cale also played the viola on the song.

Sources: Wikipedia; Songfacts; YouTube

Best of What’s New

A selection of newly released music that caught my attention

The weeks seem to be flying by these days. After having spent so much time at home since March due to the seemingly never-ending COVID-19 pandemic, I frequently find myself forgetting what day of the week it is. Anyhow, my calendar tells me today is Saturday, which means it’s time to take another look at newly released music. Without any further delay, let’s get to some great stuff I found!

Bob Mould/Siberian Butterfly

American guitarist and songwriter Bob Mould, who has been active since 1979, is primarily known for his work with punk and alternative rock bands Hüsker Dü in the late ’70s and ’80s, and Sugar in the ’90s. He also has released 13 solo albums to date. Siberian Butterfly is a catchy grungy pop rocker that reminds me a bit of Green Day. The tune came out on September 9 ahead of Mould’s 14th studio album Blue Hearts, which is scheduled for September 25. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Old guys rock! 🙂

Doves/Broken Eyes

Doves are an English alternative rock band from Manchester, England. There were formed in 1998. After going on hiatus in 2010, they regrouped in December 2018. The band includes twin brothers Jez Williams (guitar, vocals) and Andy Williams (drums, vocals), along with Jimi Goodwin (bass, vocals, guitar). Martin Rebelski (keyboards) is part of Doves’ touring line-up and has also been involved in their recording sessions. Co-written by the Williams brothers and Goodwin, Broken Eyes is a tune from the band’s fifth and latest studio album The Universal Want that appeared on September 11. Check out the track’s great sound, which drew me in right away.

The Flaming Lips/Mother Don’t Be Sad

The Flaming Lips are an American band with an eclectic style, which were formed in Oklahoma City in 1983. They include founding members Wayne Coyne (vocals, guitar, keyboards) and Michael Irvins (bass), as well as Steven Drozd (guitar, keyboards), Derek Brown (guitar, keyboards), Jake Ingall (keyboards, guitar), Matt Duckworth Kirksey (drums) and Nick Ley (percussion). The current line-up has existed since 2014. According to Wikipedia, the band’s music has varied over time and included alternative, psychedelic and experimental rock and noise pop, among others. Their mainstream breakthrough came with their ninth studio album The Soft Bulletin in 1999. The band also won three Grammy awards, including Best Surround Sound Album for their 2006 studio release At War With the Mystics. Mother Don’t Be Sad is a track from their new album American Head released on September 11. Credited to the entire band, the tune also appeared separately on August 28 as the album’s sixth upfront single. This intriguing power ballad is beautiful and haunting at the same time.

Savoy Brown/Rocking in Louisiana

Okay, we’ve come to the final tune of this Best of What’s New installment, and there hasn’t been any blues rock. Of course, I can’t let this happen! Rocking in Louisiana is a terrific tune by longtime British blues rockers Savoy Brown from their new album appropriately titled Ain’t Done Yet, which came out on August 28. This band has been around since 1965, when it was founded by guitarist Kim Simmonds and harmonica player John O’Leary. The original line-up also included Brice Portius (vocals), Trevor Jeavons (keyboards), Ray Chappell (bass) and Leo Manning (drums). Since their debut album Shake Down from September 1967, Savoy Brown have released some 40 additional studio, live and compilation records. Simmonds remains as the only original member in the band’s current version that since 2009 has also featured Pat DeSalvo (bass) and Garnet Grimm (drums). These guys are nicely rockin’, with Simmonds throwing in some sweet slide guitar work. My kind of music!

Sources: Wikipedia; YouTube