Jersey Singer-Songwriter Rick Barth Releases Acoustic Roots-Oriented Sophomore Album

I met Rick Barth in June 2018 and at the time wrote about his 2015 debut album Hand Me Down Soul. Now the singer-songwriter from Budd Lake, N.J. is out with his second record titled Fade. It’s a nice continuation of his acoustic-oriented rock, singer-songwriter ballads, as well as country and roots-oriented music.

While Barth has been performing on the New Jersey music scene as a solo artist and a member of various bands and duos for about three decades, he only decided to start writing his own music less than 10 years ago. His named influences include Butch Walker, Ryan Adams, John Lennon, Ryan Bingham, Tom Petty, Michael Trent, Jason Isbel and Parker Milsap. I can also hear traces of John Mellencamp, Bruce Springsteen and Steve Earle.

Let’s get to some music. I’d like to kick things off with the opener We Had Fun (Didn’t We?). Like all other tunes on the album, the song was written by Barth.

Next up is the title track featuring nice pedal steel guitar accents.

A vocal highlight on the album is Shine, in my opinion, where Barth’s voice beautifully blends with backing vocalist Louise Trezza.

Here is another tune I like: Stranger Things. Check out the nice dobro work!

The last track I’d like to call out is Change, a country song that to me is perhaps the musical highlight of the record. I dig the beautiful violin playing and the pedal steel guitar, which sound great together. This is perhaps somewhat ironical coming from a guy who used to say he doesn’t like country. Oh well, it just goes to show again that genres don’t need to define great music.

Apart from lead vocals, Barth handles guitars, bass and mandolin. In addition to Louise Trezza (backing vocals), other musicians on the album include Keith Dunham (bass), Wayne Wilson (pedal steel), Jim Reeber (keyboards), Rick Krueger (lap steel, dobro), Ralph Heiss (bass), Dawn Patrick (violin) and Rob Ot (percussion).

Fade was produced by Barth and Dunham and recorded at Rifftide Studio in Ledgewood, N.J. Dunham also served as recording engineer. The album is available on streaming platforms and since yesterday on CD through Barth’s website. By the way, the picture on the cover shows the former Bethlehem Steel plant in Bethlehem, Pa., which during its heyday was one of the world’s largest steel producers.

Sources: Rick Barth website, ReverbNation, BandMix.com, GigMasters, YouTube

What I’ve Been Listening To: Rick Barth/Hand Me Down Soul

A mix of rock and acoustic-oriented roots music on Jersey singer-songwriter’s studio debut

Rick Barth is another promising example that good music isn’t dead, just harder to find nowadays than say in the 60s and 70s where all you needed to do was to switch on the radio. FM radio definitely played an important role in the start of my music journey, along with my sister’s vinyl collection and my terrific guitar teacher. But back to Rick!

I met Rick last Sunday at Sarah Street Grill in Stroudsburg, Pa., while attending The Acoustic Singer-Songwriter Series. Organized by Rick, the event features a rotating lineup of New Jersey singer/songwriters and acoustic musicians. I was primarily there to see John Hathaway, a singer-songwriter from Asbury Park, N.J., who also fronts a great Neil Young tribute band called Decade. I’ve previously written about John, most recently here. John introduced me to Rick.

Rick Barth

In addition to organizing this great event, Rick is a Jersey singer-songwriter himself. In 2015, he released his studio debut Hand Me Down Soul. After having listened to the album a few times, I like what I’m hearing – a nice mix of rock and acoustic-oriented roots music, delivered with a slightly rugged voice. I can hear a little bit of Bruce Springsteen, John Mellencamp and Steve Earle here and there, who are all artists I dig. Interestingly, according to a previous review by Geoff Wilbur’s Music Blog, Rick started out his music career with hard rock and metal. He has certainly come a long way!

Hand Me Down With Soul kicks off with Wherever You Are, a nice mid-tempo rocker. Like all tracks except for one tune, the song was written by Rick, who also plays acoustic and electric guitars.

Another mid-tempo rock tune I like is Another Time With You.

The title track takes things slightly down a notch. In particular, I like Rick’s soulful vocal delivery of the tune.

I Love You (Now Go Away) is another standout to me. One of the country-oriented song’s defining features is the bluesy harmonica provided by Lou Tambone.

One of the all-acoustic songs on the record is Beautiful, an appropriate title. In addition to Rick’s vocals and acoustic guitar, the tune only features some organ by Jim Reeber in the background – really all that’s needed.

The last tune I’d like to call out is the album’s closer Invincible, another acoustic-oriented song. Rick co-wrote the lyrics with Darren Parker.

Hand Me Down was produced and engineered by Brian Csencsits at his studio Supreme Sound in Woodland Park, N.J. Apart from the above, other musicians on the record include Ralph Heiss (bass), Jeff Bridi (bass) and Mari Byrd (backing vocals on Good Old Days). Hand Me Down Soul is available on iTunes, Amazon.com and via Rick’s website.

Rick told me he is currently working on his next record. He joked he wants it be acoustic-oriented but that the folks who work with him keep suggesting to add drums and other instruments. According to his website, the album will be called Fade.

Sources: Rick Barth official website, Geoff Wilbur’s Music Blog, YouTube