Best of What’s New

A selection of newly released music that caught my attention

It’s that time of the week again to take another look at newly released music. This latest Best of What’s New installment turned out to be pretty rock-oriented. All songs are on albums that came out yesterday (April 16).

Greta Van Fleet/Built By Nations

Kicking things off is some great blistering rock by Greta Van Fleet, a rock band from Frankenmuth, Mich. They were formed in 2012 by twin brothers Josh Kiszka (vocals) and Jake Kiszka (guitar) and their younger brother Sam Kiszka (bass), along with Kyle Hauck (drums). Hauck left in 2013 and was replaced by Danny Wagner who remains the band’s drummer to this day. Greta Van Fleet have attracted plenty of attention for embracing ’70s classic rock and some criticism from certain music reviewers who accused them of ripping off early Led Zeppelin. While there’s no denying some of the Michigan rockers’ early tunes have a Led Zeppelin I vibe, I always found the criticism overblown. Plus, I dig Zep, so selfishly I didn’t mind in the first place. Greta Van Fleet have since evolved their sound, as illustrated by their latest album The Battle at Garden’s Gate. Some tracks had been released as singles ahead of what is the band’s second full-length studio album, including My Way, Soon and Age of Machine. I previously featured them here and here. Following is Built By Nations. Like all other tracks on the album, it is credited to the entire band.

Eric Church/Heart on Fire

Eric Church is a country singer-songwriter from Nashville, Tenn. According to his artist profile on Apple Music, Church is a gifted storyteller, delivering relatable, regular-guy sing-alongs with a warm, reedy drawl. The North Carolina native started early—he was writing songs at 13 and taught himself to play guitar soon after, eventually getting a taste of touring with his college band, Mountain Boys. But his sharp lyrical observations and sly humor helped him find footing in Nashville’s songwriter circuit and land a solo record deal. His debut album Sinners Like Me appeared in July 2006. The third album Chief from July 2011 brought the big breakthrough, topping both the Billboard Top Country Albums and the Billboard 200 mainstream charts. Heart on Fire, written by Church, is the opener of Heart, the first part of an ambitious triple album titled Heart & Soul that features 25 tracks. Parts 2 and 3, & and Soul, are slated to be released on April 20 and April 23, respectively.

The Offspring/Let the Bad Times Roll

The Offspring were formed in 1984 as Manic Subsidal in Garden Grove, Calif. The band, which changed their name to The Offspring in 1986, has been credited for reviving mainstream interest in punk rock, together with fellow Californian outfits Green Day and Rancid. The current line-up includes founding member Bryan “Dexter” Holland (lead vocals, guitar), along with Kevin “Noodles” Wasserman (guitar), Todd Morse (bass) and Pete Parada (drums). The band released their eponymous debut album in June 1989. Their international breakthrough, appropriately titled Smash, appeared in April 1994. Fueled by hit singles Come Out and Play, Self Esteem and Gotta Get Away, the album surged to no. 4 in the U.S. on the Billboard 200, peaked at no. 3 in Canada, topped the charts in Australia, and reached the top 5 in various European countries. Altogether, The Offspring have released 10 studio albums, 4 EPs, two compilations and multiple singles over their now 37-year career. Let the Bad Times Roll, written by Holland, is the catchy title track of their new album.

Paul McCartney & Joshua Homme/Lavatory Lil

Wrapping up this Best of What’s New installment is Paul McCartney who has been on a remarkable roll. Following the release of his 18th solo album McCartney III last December, which I reviewed here, he is back with an encore titled McCartney III Imagined. According to an announcement on his website, the album features an A-List assortment of friends, fans and brand new  acquaintances, each covering and/or reimagining their favorite  McCartney III  moments in their own signature stylesMcCartney III Imagined continues the tradition of the biggest and most diverse names in music covering Paul’s songs — an ever-expanding  lineup that ranges from more recent versions by Billie Eilish, Harry Styles, Dave  Grohl, Coldplay and The Cure, to interpretations over the years from the likes of U2, Guns N’ Roses, Earth Wind & Fire, Siouxsie and the Banshees, Marvin Gaye, Bill Withers, Joe Cocker, Stevie Wonder, Frank Sinatra, Elvis Presley, Ray Charles and so many more.  McCartney III Imagined is a testament of Paul’s enduring and unmatched influence, a legacy that stretches from “Yesterday” being the most covered song in contemporary musical history to the inspiration his current work continues to hold for generations of artists and fans. What I find remarkable is the apparent open-mindedness of McCartney who is turning 79 in June to work with a broad group of contemporary artists, such as Dominic Fike, Khruangbin, Blood Orange, St. Vincent, Phoebe Bridgers and Beck. Frankly, except for the last two, these are all new names to me! Here’s Lavatory Lil, imagined together with Joshua Homme who is best known as the main songwriter, lead vocalist and guitarist of American rock band Queens of the Stone Age.

Sources: Wikipedia; Apple Music; Paul McCartney website; YouTube

Best of What’s New

A selection of newly released music that caught my attention

After having compiled this weekly recurring feature for about nine months, I’ve developed a pretty good methodology to find new music. As more frequent visitors of the blog know, the madness doesn’t include the mainstream charts. Sometimes it’s pretty easy, other times it requires more work. This week fell into the latter category. I’m still quite happy with this new installment that features various flavors of rock, including alternative, kickass classic, indie and country.

Glom/Merit

Glom from Brooklyn, New York are a classic alt-rock inspired, fuzzy alt-rock act, according to their profile on Bandcamp. Based on this interview with Two Story Melody from March 2019, it sounds like while members of Glom have been friends and played together in various bands since their early high school years, the group only formed in 2017. Bandcamp lists Sean Dunnevant (guitar, bass, vocals), Peter Beiser (guitar, piano, vocals), Sahil Ansari (guitar, drums, percussion, synthesizer), Jonathan Crandall (synthesizer, piano, percussion), Jonathan Harwood (percussion) and Jordan Wolfe (drums, percussion, synthesizer). Merit, written by Dunnevant, is the title track of Glom’s new album released yesterday (Dec 4). It’s a quite catchy tune. Based on sampling a few other tracks on the album, these guys seem to have a knack for melodies that are easy on the ears.

Greta Van Fleet/Age of Machine

Age of Machine is the second single from Greta Van Fleet’s next album. When the kick-ass rocker appeared yesterday, the Michigan band also revealed their second full-length studio release will come out on April 16, 2021 and be titled The Battle at Garden’s Gate, Spin reported. “There was a lot of self-evolution happening during the writing of this album that was prompted by experiences I had, experiences we all had, so a lot of contemplation occurred,” explained vocalist Josh Kiszka.  “It’s reflecting a lot of the world that we’ve seen, and I think that it’s reflecting a lot of personal truth,” observed guitarist Jake Kiszka. “I suppose that everything has changed except what got us here in the first place,” added Sam Kiszka, the third of the Kiszka brothers and bassist of the band that also includes drummer Danny Wagner. Greta Van Fleet’s classic rock orientation has generated lots of excitement and, as you’d expect, some criticism over its Led Zeppelin-influenced sound. I think the new single provides more evidence that Greta Van Fleet have evolved in finding their own unique style. Really looking forward to hearing more from that album!

Juniper/Angelina

Juniper are an indie rock band from the Boston area. They were formed in the spring of 2017 by Scott Johnson, Ahren Shreeve and Alejandro Marin. In September that year, they released their eponymous debut EP. Another EP, For the First Time, came out one year later. On their website, Juniper describe their sound as “unique” with “diverse influences of alternative rock, folk, R&B and bedroom pop” – the latter being yet another genre I had not heard of before. Currently, they are working on their debut album. Meanwhile, here’s their new single Angelina. And, nope, the lovely young woman in the video isn’t Angelina.

The Wild Feathers/My Truth

Let’s wrap it up with The Wild Feathers, a country rock band founded in 2010 in Nashville, Tenn. According to a bio on AllMusic, they prefer the term “American” over Americana when describing their sound, which falls somewhere between the earnest, neo-Southern rock of the Black Crowes, the bluesy swagger of the Black Keys, and the wide-open-road country-rock of the Eagles. The band’s current lineup features founding members Ricky Young (guitar, vocals), Taylor Burns (guitar, vocals) and Joel King (bass, vocals), as well as Ben Dumas (drums). The Wild Feathers began touring frequently in 2013, playing with artists like Bob Dylan, Willie Nelson and ZZ Ward. Their eponymous debut album appeared in August 2013. My Truth is a new original song from the band’s most recent fourth album Medium Rarities, which according to a review in Glide Magazine is a collection of covers, demos, B-sides and a handful of new tunes. My Truth is a great track co-written by King, Young and country singer-songwriter Brett James.

Sources: Wikipedia; Bandcamp; Two Story Melody; Spin; Juniper website; Juniper Facebook page; AllMusic; Glide Magazine; YouTube

Greta Van Fleet’s Widely Anticipated Full-Length Debut Album Is Out And It Rocks

Anthem Of The Peaceful Army shows young Michigan rockers can move beyond Zeppelin-like crunchers

“Greta Van Fleet can’t get the Led out of its sound,” declares the headline of a Chicago Tribune review. V.e.r.y.  c.l.e.v.e.r.! “They come bearing shamelessly recycled Zeppelin-isms with a frontman who seems to have heard Rush’s “2112” a few times,” opines Rolling Stone. Did they just identify a second band Greta Van Fleet “rips off?” Asks Consequence of Sound: “The throwback rockers can resurrect the sounds of the past, but what about the future?” Gee, how about giving this young band some time beyond their first full-length album Anthem Of The Peaceful Army, which was released on Friday.

As I’m looking at the reviews of the widely anticipated record, I feel like telling certain critics to take a chill pill. Yes, there’s no denying the Michigan rockers have tunes with a Led Zeppelin I vibe. But, frankly, what’s so terrible to sound similar to one of the greatest rock bands of all time? Especially in an era where mediocrity gets most of the limelight? Plus, at least to my ears, Anthem Of The Peaceful Army proves there’s actually more to Greta Van Fleet than Zep-style rockers. Caveat: As a former bassist and someone who has listened to loud music many times, I can’t deny a certain degree of hearing loss!😆

Greta Van Fleet
Greta Van Fleet (from left): Sam Kiszka, Josh Kiszka, Danny Wagner and Jake Kiszka

All tracks on the album are credited to all four members of the band. They include Josh Kiszka (lead vocals) and his brothers Jake Kiszka (guitar, backing vocals), who is Josh’s twin, and Sam Kiszka (bass, keyboards, backing vocals), as well as Danny Wagner (drums, backing vocals). Let’s kick things off with the opener Age Of Man. Except perhaps for the lead vocals, right out of the gate there’s a tune I don’t feel sounds particularly like Led Zeppelin.

Next up: The Cold Wind. Okay, this kick-ass rocker has an undeniable Zeppelin vibe. I can already see some critics getting their knickers twisted over it. But guess what? I don’t care – on the contrary, I love the fact that here we have a young band that embraces full throttle classic rock, a genre that generally isn’t doing particularly well these days. Wouldn’t it be cool if the tune would top the Billboard Hot 100?

You’re The One introduces acoustic-oriented rock. But wait, didn’t Zep also do plenty of acoustic stuff? So is it yet another rip off? I don’t worry much about it. All I can say is I like this tune. It’s got a catchy melody. I also dig the organ part.

Anthem is another acoustic track. Here’s the first verse of the reflective song: Read the news/There’s something every day/So many people/Thinkin’ different ways/You say “Where is the music/A tune to free the soul/A simple lyric/To unite us all?”

Let’s throw in one more tune: Lover, Leaver (Taker, Believer), another nice rocker and the album’s closer.

According to a story in the Detroit Free Press, Anthem of the Peaceful Army was produced by the Rust Brothers, three “veteran Detroit music guys” who are connected to Kid RockAl Sutton, the owner of Rustbelt Studios and Rock’s longtime recording engineer; Marlon Young, lead guitarist of Twisted Brown Tucker, Rock’s longtime backing band; and Herschel Boone, a songwriter and producer, who also worked with Rock as a backing vocalist. The album, which appears on Lava Records, was produced at Rustbelt and at Blackbird Studio in Nashville.

I guess some of what is happening to Greta Van Fleet is perhaps unavoidable for a band that has received a lot of attention in a relative short amount of time. Add to this the fact that none other than Robert Plant during an interview with Australia’s Network 10 said of the band, “They are ‘Led Zeppelin I'” and called lead vocalist Josh Kiszka “a beautiful little singer,” as reported by the Detroit Free Press in a separate article, and you can see why there’s so much buzz around Greta Van Fleet. And buzz oftentimes also brings less than flattering commentary to the forefront.

I think Greta Van Fleet is on a promising trajectory. Keep in mind they are very young guys. Josh and Jake are 22, while Sam and Denny are 19. Their talent is undeniable. With Anthem Of The Peaceful Army they have taken a step forward. Let’s just give them time to find their own unique style and sound. And if in the meantime, they continue to throw in some Zeppelin-like rockers I have no problem with that whatsoever!

Sources: Wikipedia, Chicago Tribune, Rolling Stone, Consequence Of Sound, Detroit Free Press, YouTube