You Say It’s Your Birthday

Sir Paul turned 75 today and he is not slowing down

To those who read this blog or know me otherwise, it shouldn’t come as a big surprise that Paul McCartney is one of my all-time favorite music artists. Today, Sir Paul is celebrating his 75th birthday, and I sure hope he’s gonna have a good time.

James Paul McCartney was born in the middle of World War II on June 18, 1942 at Walton Hospital in Liverpool, England. His mother was Mary Patricia, who was a nurse at that hospital. And, by the way, that’s the mother Mary (not the Virgin Mary), who inspired the lyrics of one of McCartney’s most beautiful ballads:

“When I find myself in times of trouble/Mother Mary comes to me/Speaking words of wisdom, let it be.” 

His father James “Jim” McCartney couldn’t witness his son’s birth, since he was working as a volunteer firefighter during the war. While I know that Penny Lane, one of my other favorite McCartney tunes, reflects childhood memories, I haven’t found any references that suggest the fireman referenced in the song was inspired by Sir Paul’s father.

Fast-forward to July 6, 1957. That was the day McCartney met John Lennon for the first time. It was at a performance of John’s high school band The Quarrymen. The encounter would start a working relationship between the two that would change music history forever.

I could continue to recount McCartney’s history, but it has been told many times and, it’s also safe assume, by people who know much more about it than I do. So instead of an additional attempt to create yet another write-up, I’d like to celebrate Sir Paul’s birthday with a selection of his music over the past 50-plus years. Let me repeat this: 50-plus years – wow!

All My Loving (1963)

Things I Said Today (1964)

Yesterday (1965)

Here, There And Everywhere (1966)

Back in the U.S.S.R. (1968)

Let It Be (1970)

Maybe I’m Amazed (1970)

Band On the Run (1973)

Silly Love Songs (1976)

Take It Away (1982)

My Brave Face (1989)

Hope of Deliverance (1993)

Run Devil Run (1999)

Fine Line (2005)

New (2013)

Birthday (1968)

While like many other Beatles songs Birthday was officially credited to Lennon-McCartney and, according to the Beatles Bible, there are different accounts whether McCartney wrote it or whether it was indeed a co-write with Lennon, it simply feels right to end the post with it.

I also decided to take a clip that was captured during McCartney’s ongoing One on One World Tour. Last July, I was fortunate enough to catch one of the tour’s shows. More on that amazing concert is here. Once again, happy birthday, Sir Paul, and rock on!

Sources: Wikipedia, The Beatles Bible, YouTube

British Invasion Rocks Atlantic City

Amazing tribute bands took audience back to greatest period in rock music

One of the main reasons I am on Facebook is to get news about the artists and music I love. Last weekend, an announcement popped up in my newsfeed about a British Invasion tribute festival in Atlantic City. With cool-looking bands and free admission, it didn’t take long to convince me to go there. After all, what could possibly go better together than the sin of gambling and rock & roll? And so I hopped in my car and went there yesterday.

To say it right upfront, I had a great time, and so did the other folks who had come out to the deck at the Golden Nugget Hotel & Casino. Three tribute bands brought back the 60s and 70s: Glimmer Twins, Who’s Next and Britain’s Finest. Each did a great job looking and sounding like the rock & roll heroes they represented.

Glimmer Twins

Adopting the nickname of the songwriting partnership of Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, the Glimmer Twins hail from Philly, Pa. The band is led by Keith Call (vocals, harp) and Bernie Bollendorf (guitars, vocals), who bring to life Jagger and Richards in the ’70s. Call has Jagger’s facial expressions, moves and swagger down to the details, while Bollendorf beautifully captures Richards’ onstage persona, from the way he’s holding his guitars to the cigarettes in his mouth while playing. Even both of their voices sound similar to Jagger and Richards – amazing!

Glimmer Twins 2

Call and Bollendorf are backed up by a kick ass band, which according to their Facebook page consists of Michael Rubino (guitars), Chris Bollendorf (drums), Rob Ekstedt (bass), Rocco Notte (keyboards), Valorie Steel (backup vocals), Bobby Michaels (saxophone, flute, organ) and Bill Cancel (saxophone, flute, organ). In fact, it’s safe to assume they sound better than the their stoned rock & roll heroes during many of their ’70s shows!

Some of The Rolling Stones classics the band played included Start Me Up, Wild Horses, Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo (Heartbreaker), (I Can’t Get No) SatisfactionHappy, It’s Only Rock ‘N’ Roll (But I Like It) and what I thought was a highlight: Gimme Shelter, where the band’s African-American backing vocalist demonstrated her amazing pipes. Here’s a little demo.

Who’s Next

Unfortunately, I couldn’t find much public information on this tribute band to The Who. They have a Facebook group, which I’ve asked to join. What I can say for the time being is these four guys would make Roger Daltrey and Pete Townshend really proud. Who knows, perhaps they’re even aware of them!

Who's Next 2

Apparently named after The Who’s fifth legendary studio album from 1971, the band strives to look and sound like the real thing during the ’70s. The singer looks like he could be a younger brother of Daltrey – similar height, similar body build, similar stage persona; oh, and he has a pretty good voice, too! The guitarist, bassist and drummer also do an excellent job personifying Townshend, John Entwistle and Keith Moon, respectively.

Who’s Next’s set included classics, such as Can’t ExplainSubstitute, Pinball Wizard and appropriately various tunes from the 1971 album, such as Baba O’Riley, Bargain, Behind Blue Eyes and the epic Won’t Get Fooled Again. Here’s a nice promo clip I found from the band.

Britain’s Finest

I’ve seen various tribute bands to The Beatles over the decades, including some that were very good and others that were – well – not as great. The music of the Fab Four, especially the songs they played during their live period, may be relatively simple. But The Beatles were a fantastic live act, and it’s sure as heck not easy to replicate that experience. Britain’s Finest comes pretty darn close to it, both in terms of their looks and the way they’re playing the songs.

Britain's Finest 2

The members of the band are Ruben Amaya (John Lennon), Benjamin Chadwick (Paul McCartney), Robert F. Bielma (George Harrison) and Luis G. Renteria (Ringo Starr). According to their Facebook page, these guys are based in Los Angeles and founded the band in 2011. Based on their website, the band recreates both the live years and the later studio period of John, Paul, George and Ringo.

Yesterday’s set was focused on The Fab Four’s live period. It included classics, such as A Hard Day’s Night, Help, I Saw Her Standing There, Roll Over Beethoven and Twist and Shout. The guys also did something you could well imagine The Beatles might do, if they would still be around: Announcing a song from The White Album, they played Nirvana’s Smells Like Teen Spirit. Not only was it a hilarious joke, but they were really killing it! Here’s a clip that in addition to the music also nicely illustrates how these guys do a great job portraying The Beatles’ humor.

To anyone who enjoys listening to the British Invasion and the Stones, The Who and The Beatles in particular, I can highly recommend the above bands. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: It may only be rock & roll, but I sure as heck liked it!

Sources: Glimmer Twins Facebook page, Britain’s Finest Facebook page and website, Wikipedia, YouTube

On This Day in Rock & Roll History: June 3

1964: Ahead of their upcoming world tour, The Beatles met for a recording session at Abbey Road’s Studio Two, according to the Beatles Bible. The session, which lasted from 5:30 to 9:00 PM, started with George Harrison recording a demo of You Know What to Do, a tune that would remain unreleased until 1995’s Anthology 1. Moreover, The Beatles recorded a demo of John Lennon’s No Reply, which was included on Beatles For Sale, the band’s fourth studio album. The Fab Four also made the last recordings for A Hard Day’s Night, the film soundtrack and their third studio album, taping some overdubs for Lennon’s Any Time At All and Paul McCartney’s Things We Said Today.

1967: Aretha Franklin hit no. 1 on the U.S. singles chart with Respect, which would become one of her signature songs. The tune was written and originally released by Otis Redding in 1965. Franklin’s version became an anthem of the feminist movement and earned her two Grammy Awards in 1968 for “Best Rhythm & Blues Recording” and “Best Rhythm & Blues Solo Vocal Performance, Female.” The track was also included in the soundtrack for Blues Brothers 2000, the sequel to the iconic 1980 motion picture featuring Dan Aykroyd and John Belushi as “Joliet” Jake and Elwood Blues, respectively. That movie featured another great Aretha Franklin song, Think.

1970: Deep Purple released their fourth studio album, Deep Purple in Rock. It was the first record to feature the band’s classic Mark II line-up of Ritchie Blackmore (guitar), Jon Lord (keyboards), Ian Paice (drums, percussion), Ian Gillan (lead vocals) and Roger Glover (bass). The album includes classics, such as Speed King and Child in Time. Black Night, another Deep Purple gem, was recorded at the same time but not included on the album. Instead, it was released separately as a single. While Deep Purple in Rock was the band’s breakthrough album in Europe, climbing to no. 1 on the German album chart and reaching no. 4 in the U.K., success in the U.S. was more moderate with a no. 143 placement on the Billboard 200.

1977: Bob Marley & Wailers released Exodus, their ninth studio album. In addition to the title song, the record includes some of Marley’s greatest reggae classics like Jamming and One Love/People Get Ready. Recorded in London after Marley’s departure from Jamaica in the wake of an assassination attempt, Exodus finally brought this exceptional artist the wide international recognition he so much deserved. The record peaked at no. 8 on the U.K. Albums Chart and at no. 20 on the U.S. Billboard 200. The album earned gold certifications in the U.S., U.K. and Canada.

Sources: The Beatles Bible, This Day in Music.com, Wikipedia, YouTube

Sgt. Pepper Hits 50 And Is Getting Better

Producer Giles Martin and music engineer Sam Okell have created what The Beatles may well have wanted the iconic album to sound like, had they cared about the stereo mix in 1967

On June 1, 1967, The Beatles released Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band in England. The U.S. release appeared the following day. Since so much has been written about the history of the groundbreaking album, I won’t repeat it and instead focus on the 50th anniversary special edition, which appeared yesterday (May 26). The impressive reissue comes in four different configurations, including a double LP-set I’m proud to own – my first new vinyl in 30 years!

No matter whether or not you agree with Rolling Stone’s bold assessment that Sgt. Pepper “is the most important rock & roll album ever made,” there can be no doubt it’s one of the most famous records of all time. And an album that took recording innovations The Beatles had introduced on their previous studio album Revolver to the next level and completed their transformation into an all-studio band. So why did Giles Martin, the son of George Martin, make the gutsy decision to tinker with it? In a nutshell, he wanted to improve the listening experience of the album’s most common version, the stereo mix.

“In 1967, all care to attention and detail were applied to making the mono LP, with The Beatles present for all mixes,” explains Martin in the liner notes of the reissue [note: I can only quote the liner notes for the deluxe vinyl set, since I don’t own any of the other three configurations]. “Almost as an afterthought, the stereo album was mixed very quickly without them. Yet it is the stereo version that most people listen to today. After forensically working out what the team had been up to when mixing the mono album, engineer Sam Okell and I set out about creating a new stereo version by returning to the original four-track tapes. We soon realised why we were doing this. The music recorded five decades ago sounds both contemporary and timeless; trapped in a time-lock waiting to pop like a cork from a champagne bottle.”

Sgt. Pepper 2

Martin’s comments are a nice way of saying that the previous stereo remix, while representing an improvement over the original rather poor stereo version, still by far did not come close to the mono version. Essentially, his goal was to create a new stereo mix that preserves the best elements of the mono version, which is widely considered to be the best mix. So how did he do?

My point of reference is what must be the initial “bad” stereo mix, which I’ve owned on vinyl since my teenage years, not the mono version. I also should mention my home stereo and loudspeakers are not high-end equipment. Even with all these caveats, and I’m afraid partial hearing loss from my long ago band days as a bassist, there are definitely some obvious improvements I’ve noticed. Getting a good set of headphones would probably reveal more.

One of the things The Beatles’ record engineers did to quickly create stereo mixes back in the ’60s was to put all or most of the vocals on one channel and most of the instruments on the other channel. Unfortunately, this oftentimes made the singing less forceful and muffled some of the music. One of tunes where this is very obvious is the album’s title song. For the remix, Paul McCartney’s lead vocals were moved to the center, making it more like a mono version, which substantially adds to its dynamic.

Another notable difference between the two vinyl stereo mixes I own is that the instruments have a clearer and more vibrant sound on the new version. Good examples are the horns in the title song, Ringo Starr’s drums in With a Little Help From My Friends and McCartney’s bass in Lucy In the Sky With Diamonds. “My father had to record everything on a four track,” explained Martin in an interview with NPR, conducted ahead of the remix’s release. “And that was bounced to another four-track. [Each time sounds are bounced to another tape the sound degrades]. What we do is we go back to the previous generation, so we’re mixing off generations of tape that they never mixed off…What was recorded in ’67 sounds pure and crystal clear — there’s not any hiss or anything.”

Sgt. Pepper 3

In addition to the stereo remix, all configurations of the special anniversary release include earlier versions of the songs. In the case of the vinyl set, it’s one earlier take of each song, with the tracks being arranged in the same order than on the final album. I think it’s safe to say these earlier takes are primarily meaningful to true Beatles fans, less to casual listeners.

Comparing the takes with the final versions certainly is fascinating to me. But I think I’m okay with one alternate take per song and don’t need to have multiple earlier versions. Perhaps the most notable example on the vinyl set is take 1 of A Day In the Life, in which the final E note is hummed by “The Beatles and friends gathered around a microphone,” as the liner notes describe it. But even after overdubbing, the humming was a mismatch to the preceding climax of the orchestra. Therefore, it “was replaced by a cavernous E major chord struck on a variety of keyboards.”

What I find even more intriguing than the unfinished tracks is listening to the conversations right before and after the takes between (George) Martin and The Beatles and among members of the band. One cool example occurs right after Lucy In the Sky With Diamonds, when McCartney demonstrates to John Lennon an alternative rhythm to sing the line Cellophane flowers of yellow and green. It’s a nice illustration how the two truly collaborated in harmony, something that would start to unravel only a few months later after Beatles manager Brian Epstein had passed away.

George and Giles Martin

The remix of Sgt. Pepper was not Martin’s first foray into Beatles territory. In 2006, he collaborated with his father on Love, which is part soundtrack to the theatrical production by Cirque du Soleil and part remix album. In fact, as George noted in a 2007 interview with Sound on Sound, he had given up recording because of bad hearing, but when McCartney, Starr, Olivia Harrison and Yoko Ono approached him about the project, he couldn’t refuse. “But I couldn’t have done it without Giles. He’s my ears.” In 2009, Giles produced the music for the video game The Beatles: Rock Band. He also was executive producer for McCartney’s 2013 studio album New.

The above poses the question whether Martin has any plans to remix other Beatles albums that will hit their 5oth anniversary over the next couple of years. “I don’t know,” he told The Independent. “I speak to Paul or Olivia Harrison or Ringo and Yoko [Ono] about this…We all talk about what’s the right thing to do morally. It’s not a question of keeping the brand going or shifting units…There’s so much love for it that if people want it… I mean, The White Album turns 50 next year which actually, to be honest, I’d love to have a go at mixing. There’s a weird moral context behind this: the mono of Sgt. Pepper’s is the definitive version and the studio was done very quickly, but you can’t say that about The White Album as it was mixed very quickly in different rooms by different people. I think if there’s a desire for it, then yes is the answer…But it’s not my decision. If people want me to work, I’ll work.”

Sources: Wikipedia; liner notes, Sgt. Pepper deluxe 2-LP vinyl package; The Beatles web site; NPR “All Songs Considered”; Sound on Sound; The Independent

A Night of RAIN Brings Beatlemania to Red Bank

A Facebook ad about this Beatles tribute band delivered what it had promised with a great show last night at the historic Count Basie Theatre in Red Bank, N.J.

Last year, an ad on Facebook announced RAIN: A Tribute to The Beatles was going to play the historic Count Basie Theatre in Red Bank, N.J. As a true Beatlemaniac, I looked them up on YouTube right away. Over the years, I’ve encountered various bands covering The Beatles – some pretty good, others not so much – so I wasn’t quite sure what to expect. In this case, I was immediately intrigued and got tickets for last night’s show.

To put it right upfront, RAIN delivered what the YouTube clips had promised and then some. These guys are truly amazing and probably come pretty darn close to the real thing. Not only are the vocals almost indistinguishable from the original songs, but the band also does an amazing job looking and acting like The Fab Four during different times of their career.

RAIN was founded in Laguna Beach, Calif. as Reign in 1975, initially playing both original songs and Beatles covers. The band took its name from the 1966 song Rain, written by John and credited to Lennon-McCartney. The tune was released as the B-side to the single Paperback Writer. In 2010, RAIN took their act to Broadway, performing 300 shows there between October 2010 and July 2011.

For each of the Fab Four RAIN has various musicians: Steve Landes & Jimmy Irizarri (John Lennon – vocals, rhythm guitar, piano & harmonica), Paul Curatello, Joey Curatolo & Ian Garcia (Paul McCartney – vocals, bass & piano), Alastar McNeil, Joe Bithorn & Jimmy Pou (George Harrison – vocals & lead guitar) and Ralph Castelli, Aaron ChiazzaDouglas Cox (Ringo Starr – drums, percussion & vocals). Additionally Mark Beyer and Chris Smallwood help out on keyboards & percussion. RAIN is managed by Mark Lewis, the band’s founder and original keyboardist.

RAIN 3

Last night’s lineup included Landes, Paul Curatello, McNeil, Chiazza and Beyer. RAIN worked their way through The Beatles’ music catalogue in rough chronological order. The show was divided in five sections: The early years mostly included singles The Beatles released between 1963 and 1965, such as Please Please Me, I Want to Hold Your Hand, She Loves You, A Hard Day’s Night, If I Fell and Yesterday. The section also featured a reenactment of the Fab Four’s first visit to the U.S. and appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show.

RAIN 4

Part 2 covered The Beatles’ legendary open-air concert in front of more than 55,000 screaming fans at Shea Stadium in August 1965. This section featured Ticket to Ride, The Night Before, I Feel Fine, Day Tripper and Twist and Shout. The next part captured the end of the band’s live touring and mostly included songs from Rubber Soul and Revolver, such as Drive My Car, In My Life, Eleanor Rigby and Got to Get You Into My Life. The section ended slightly out of chronological order with two tunes from the White Album: Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da and While My Guitar Gently Weeps featuring a superb rendition of Eric Clapton’s guitar solo – a highlight of the show.

RAIN 5

Following a short intermission came the evening’s biggest thrill – in honor of the 50th anniversary of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, RAIN played the entire album in chronological order, from the title song to A Day In the Life. It was truly amazing!

RAIN 6

The last part of the official set featured a selection of post-Sgt. Pepper tunes, including Here Comes the Sun, Lennon’s solo single Give Peace a Chance, Get Back, Revolution and The End. The band did not play any tunes from Magical Mystery Tour and Yellow Submarine, but given they performed all of Sgt. Pepper and the show lasted for more than two hours, one cannot complain. When not surprisingly at the end of the official program the audience was cheering for more, RAIN played Hey Jude as an encore.

Here’s a nice clip of more than one hour of footage from a concert RAIN performed in Mexico in April 2013.

Sources: Wikipedia, RAIN (official web site), YouTube

What I’ve been listening to: The Beatles Live at the Hollywood Bowl

For people who know me or have read the blog, it should not come as a big surprise that I would choose the newly released live album by The Beatles. I started listening to The Fab Four almost 40 years ago and never stopped.

Yesterday, the widely anticipated remixed, remastered and expanded version of The Beatles’ live album was released. Live at the Hollywood, which originally appeared in 1977 on vinyl and was titled The Beatles at the Hollywood Bowl, captures episodes of rock & roll history that happened more than 50 years ago. It’s simply a must-have for every Beatles fan, especially folks like me who never got a chance to actually see The Beatles in concert.

The album includes material from three shows The Beatles did at the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles, on August 23, 1964 and August 29 & 30, 1965.

Producing a professional record from these performances was no easy feat. The task to produce the initial record from 1977 was given to none other than George Martin, The Beatles’ former producer. His first challenge was to find a working machine that could play back the three-track concert tapes. Once Martin did, he noticed the tape deck overheated while running, threatening to destroy the concert tapes! In addition, the sound quality of the tapes was pretty poor.

Together with recording engineer with Geoff Emerick, Martin came up with the solution to cool the machine with blowing cold air from a vacuum cleaner while transferring the material to a 16-track machine – literally a pretty cool idea! Working with a 16-track machine allowed for filtering, equalizing, editing and mixing the music. I have the original vinyl album from 1977, and I must say the result of Martin’s and Emerick’s work is beautiful. It’s also another impetus to get a turntable, which I currently don’t have!

The remixed and enhanced version of the album was produced by Giles Martin, George Martin’s son who previously collaborated with his now deceased father on the soundtrack for Love, the Cirque du Soleil production based on the music by The Beatles. Following is what he said about the latest production, according to thebeatleseightdaysaweek.com, the companion web site for the forthcoming Beatles film documentary “Eight Days a Week: The Touring Years” by Ron Howard:

“A few years ago, Capitol Studios called, saying they’d discovered some Hollywood Bowl three-track tapes in their archive. We transferred them and noticed an improvement over the tapes we’ve kept in the London archive. Alongside this I’d been working for some time with a team headed by technical engineer James Clark on demix technology, the ability to remove and separate sounds from a single track. With Sam Okell, I started work on remixing the Hollywood tapes. Technology has moved on since my father worked on the material all those years ago. Now there’s improved clarity, and so the immediacy and visceral excitement can be heard like never before.”

So how about the actual music? It is a mix of songs from The Beatles’ first five studio albums Please Please Me (1963), With the Beatles (1963), A Hard Day’s Night (1964), Beatles for Sale (1964) and Help! (1965). The album includes many hits from these albums, such as A Hard Day’s Night, Help!, She Loves You and Can’t Buy Me Love. The new version also features four previously unreleased songs: I Want to Hold Your Hand, Everybody’s Trying to Be My Baby, Baby’s in Black and my favorite of these additional tracks, You Can’t Do That.

While I love The Beatles’ original songs, I have to say I’ve always been particularly fond of their covers of rock & roll songs. A number of these gems are on this live album, including the fantastic stage-setting opener Twist and Shout, Dizzy, Miss Lizzy, Boys, Long Tall Sally and the Chuck Berry classic, Roll Over Beethoven.

I think the best way to finish this post is to take a look at what the great George Martin said in the liner notes to the 1977 original album. Following are some excerpts:

“I was not in favor for taping their performance. I knew the quality of the recording could not equal what we could do in the studio, we but thought we would try anyhow…”

“The chaos, I might almost say panic, that reigned at these concerts was unbelievable unless you were there…The Beatles had no “fold back” speakers, so they could not hear what they were singing, and the eternal shriek from 17,000 healthy, young lungs made even a jet plane inaudible…”

“The fact that [the tapes] were the only live recordings of the Beatles in existence (if you discount inferior bootlegs) did not impress me. What did impress me, however, was the electric atmosphere and raw energy that came over…”

“Those of us who were lucky enough to be present at a live Beatle concert – be it in Liverpool, London, New York, Washington, Los Angeles, Sydney or wherever – will know how amazing, how unique those performances were…And for the others who wondered what on earth all the fuzz was about, this album may give a little clue…” 

Well said, George!

 

What I’ve Been Listening To: Wings Over America

I’m introducing a new category for the blog about albums I’ve been listening to. First up is Wings Over America.

Saturday and Sunday mornings when preparing and having breakfast, I oftentimes listen to entire albums. While in the era of iTunes and the like this may sound like an outdated concept, I can highly recommend it!

Since only a few weeks ago I saw Paul McCartney in Hershey, PA and the 50th anniversary of The Beatles’ Revolver was earlier this week, perhaps it’s not a surprise I chose an album that falls in the same realm: Wings Over America, a fantastic live set that captures the band’s 1975-1976 “Over The World” tour.

Released in December 1976 as a three-vinyl record set, Wings Over America includes recordings from various shows of the tour’s American leg from May to June 1976. It was the first time Paul performed live in the U.S. since The Beatles’ final live tour there in 1966. I also read it apparently was also the only time Wings played in the U.S. and Canada, which surprised me, given Paul’s enormous popularity in the States.

In addition to many Wings classics like JetLet Me Roll ItLive and Let Die, Letting Go and Band On the Run, the set features five of Paul’s songs from The Beatles era: Lady Madonna, The Long and Winding Road, I’ve Just Seen a Face, Blackbird and Yesterday. Another standout is Maybe I’m Amazed, which originally appeared on Paul’s first solo album after the break-up of The Beatles, McCartney, in April 1970. The live version of the song was also released as a single in February 1977 and remains a staple on many rock radio stations to this day. In my opinion, it’s much more dynamic than the studio version!

Just like I felt about the recent show in Hershey, I think the true highlights on Wings Over America are the acoustic pieces: Picasso’s Last Words, the Paul Simon song Richard Cory, Bluebird, I’ve Just Seen a Face, Blackbird and Yesterday.

Based on two of Paul’s live shows I was fortunate to see, which in addition to Hershey included a gig in the late 1980s in Germany, I have to say Wings Over America does a beautiful job to capture the concert experience. Obviously, with so many additional albums Paul has released since 1976, his live set has evolved quite a bit. In addition to songs from these albums, it now includes many more Beatles songs, both from the band’s early period and the later more experimental phase.

Wings Over America hit No. 1 in the U.S. in early 1977 and N0. 8 in the UK. I read it has sold more than four million copies in the U.S. alone and apparently was the first triple record release by a group to reach the top spot. The single off the set, Maybe I’m Amazed, made it to No. 10 on the Billboard Hot 100 and No. 28 on the UK chart.

During his live tours, Paul has always played with terrific musicians, so my musings about Wings Over America wouldn’t be complete without acknowledging the band. In addition to Paul (vocals, bass, piano, acoustic guitar) and his wife Linda McCartney (keyboards, backing vocals), Wings included original Moody Blues member Denny Laine (vocal, electric and acoustic guitars, bass, keyboards, percussion), Jimmy McCulloch (electric and acoustic guitars, bass, vocals), Joe English (drums, percussion, backing vocals) and a fantastic brass and woodwind section consisting of Howie Casey, Steve Howard, Thaddeus Richard and Tony Dorsey.